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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to using wire-fed welders and recently bought a 115V Lincoln MIG PAK 10. BTW, this is all in regards to gasless, flux-cored wire.
I bought some 1/4" plate steel to practice on and at first set the settings to what was suggested by Lincoln: Power Level "D", and Wire Speed at "2". D is the highest power setting and 2 is the slowest speed setting.
I've found that I get poor welds using this speed setting so when I've got it up to 5 or so, it is much better. At least from what I can see. The welds are much smoother and even. Just wondering what you all weld at when doing thicker steel? Any suggestions?

Thanks!
Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Chris. I guess I still need to practice a bit more :) I'll give speed 3 a shot and see how it goes.

Cheers!
Steve
 
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I also use the lincoln 100 and D2 (roughly) is my setting for 1/4in. plate.
You want to be able to stay in the area you are welding longer so as to get better penetration. The weld should flow and not be a spattering mess. The weld should "sound" nice while as you are welding. Hold the stinger about 1/4 in. to 3/8 in. from the steel. Anymore and you'll lose to much heat.
You will learn to allow a longer stinger to fine tune your heat in other applications. For 1/4 in. burn slow and hot as you can. If the weld does not go deep enough it can't hold on very well under stress. You get the idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sorry, but the "stinger"? The wire itself right? I'm new to the lingo :)
Now that we're on the topic, how long should the wire be as it sticks out of the contact tip? I find if it's a bit longer, it's easier to weld with. Or could that be a problem???

Cheers!
Steve
 
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are those campbell hausfeld wire feed flux core welders i see on ebay good enough to weld perch plates for a spoa kit??
 
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You should only have about 1/4 in. to 3/8 in. of wire sticking out while you are welding. The longer you let the wire get the more heat you lose. Try this ... start a weld with one hand and turn the wire speed knob with the other while welding. Start at 1 wire speed and slowly turn it up untill it is burning smoothly and the weld "sounds" good. remember to keep only 1/4 to 3/8 in. of wire sticking out at the most for higher heat. You'll get the hang of it. Make sure the steel you are welding is clean. (or it will spatter) steady hand and use the force Luke! Practice. Remember this is for thicker steel only. Thinner requires a different technique.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
OK, I think I understand the thicker steel technique but what about steel, for say, spring perches? That's one of the things I'll be welding and am most concerned about.
Any tips???

Cheers!
Steve
 
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set your lincoln to the highest heat. Your 110ac right? I've done spring perches, shock mounts etc... BE CAREFULL! These are important welds especially for a newbie to welding. Just remember to burn hot and make sure it burns deep down. Welding to the surface is no good. The weld must penetrate down into the axle a bit to hold correctly. Heat is your friend. Keep the stinger short. Practice alot first. Good luck.
 
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The stinger is the amount of wire sticking out the end of the gun. The shorter the better,with a lower powered unit keep it short and hot!! Good luck!!
ROB
 

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I use a wal mart campbell hausfield 70 amp 100 dollar one and it kicks man I have welded some stuff thta I thought I never could when it comes to some things to weld on a sammy this is all you need but other than sammies I would not use anything less than 100+amps then again I have only really primarily worked on sammies so go figure!
 

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Well I got lucky and picked up a welder that the welding shops say does not exist. A Miller Matic 120. They think it's a Automotive welder (what ever that means). It runs on 220 so totaly different ball park. So what I was goint to say in the first place. Try looking at what you welds actualy did, like they did in school, try pulling them apart so you can see what gives first. Another option is cutting them apart, so you can see how good the weld is. Or you can try to find someone to review your welds and give you pointers on how you are doing. Just a thought, you don't want your purches to fail, it is not worth it. Your life is worth more than that. Make sure your welds are up to par before you do something major. Just my .02
 

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I also have a weld 100 but converted to gas. its great and no splater and i have welded 6" dia. 3/8" thick black gas pipe. that actually stopped a 10,000 lbs forklift. i had it on D4 BUT I DID A QUICK WELD TO GET IT HOT then went back and did a side to side fill-in-weld works great.

if you read tho whole cover on the welder it does say it will weld it with repeat passes. their is a trick take a small butane torch heat the area of weld first then weld it. it will look better and hold better. also if you cut it(the weld area) in a 45* angle it will look better when it's finished

i would not suggest anyone that is a beginner to weld anything that could fail and hurt someone please practice
 

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I agree, Gary . That older model Miller is great, don't let go of it. They were originally used for auto body work , and have a good heavy transformer . The newer models pretty much suck , since they use a lot cheaper and lighter parts. If you can pick one up and carry it , it's not worth having . I've thawed pipes with my old buzz box, running at 220 amps for ten minutes or longer, until the pipes glowed . The old girl just keeps on ticking. The best way to make sure of good penetration is to groove out your steel first if you use a low amperage unit . Try breaking apart the weld to see how well it penetrated. Also, for guys using 110v flux units, be very careful how far and how hard you weld on axle tubes. The unit's ability to maintain it's amperage against it's duty cycle will determine how well the weld turns out . You are way better off making two passes at limited depth , with the weld's being flattened out . The lower the wire speed, and higher the amperage, the better the penetration . Also, as mentioned before , keep the arc length on the stinger fairly short , or the weld will be too cold. Just be careful not to overheat and stress the axle tubes on a Zuk , since they use a high strenght steel that is thinner than most .
Sarge
 

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the funny thing about this welder is that you have no amp settin just a settin to which rod you are usin which is pretty much a 50-70 amp set up with out a gauge so you pretty much just stick to what you have got but the trick to usin these is to weld about 1 inch at a time cause if your axle starts "glowin" then you most likely will warp the metal and end up an example on how not to weld perches on the RRO website!
 

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All of the posts had good advise. I'll add to the practice suggestion, and the pre heat sugestion. I pre heat even 1/4 when using a 110 welder. It makes a big difference. Now I'll be lazy, Wrote this on the same subject awhile back...

practice is the key. Get some scrap and play with it. Try welding different materials and then seeing how they will break. i.e. Take a hunk of angle and weld a test piece to it on one side, maybe an inch of weld. Use a crescent and break it off. Its called destructive testing. Look at how it failed. Try higher heat, then lower. Multiple passes. Both sides, Different thickness. Dissimilar sizes. etc. A friend and I sent most of a weekend playing like this, years ago. We both learned a tremendous amount. We also compared arc to mig. When it was all over he bought a mig the next week. (We were arguing the merits of mig vs arc, I won!) The point is you can lean things no amount of just straight project welding can teach you since you will rarely try to tear them up other than in use.

I sold my Miller 135S 220 welder last year and bought a new Lincoln SP155 110. Mostly due to space constraints. (You'd have to see my garage to believe it). You can weld heavier than the charts will say, but you have to approach it differently.

I will pre heat anything over about 3/16 thick. Not a lot, just so it's too hot to touch. Maybe 150-200 deg or so. It makes all the difference in the world. I also use multiple passes on heavy stuff. That's where I learned this trick. On multiple passes you build up heat. The second and third passes always welded better. So.... When I started getting those results I tried pre heating a bit. Works great. The reason it works is it prevents cold welds. This is where the welding puddle hits cold metal and it cools the puddle before melting itself. Minimal or no fusion. Heavy material is prone to this because the larger mass acts as a heat sink and the heat dissipates before doing its job.

A word of caution. A little pre heat is good, but this is a case of more is NOT better. If you get things too hot you can affect the strength of the materials. Welders will always tell you that there welds never break. Usually true, What breaks is the weakened material next to the weld. (Is this not a bad weld?) Welding will always cause a stress riser to be formed. Good design and proper gussets where needed, prevent the load from falling on the weakened area.

Lots more to say but that's probably enough for now.

-Outlaw, Why? Because it can!


 
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Just to throw in my 2 cents on this one:

My best friend is a professionally trained (apprenticed) welder/machinist and before I ever started welding and constantly ever since, I ask for his help and advice. His one word answer to doing good welds: preparation!

Always grind your welding surfaces until all trace of dirt, rust, etc is gone and only bare clean metal remains (he explained that in some rare cases, the oils in a fingerprint is enough contamination to make for a bad weld).

Also, (if possible) bevel your edges like was stated above. In his and my opinions, this applies to thinner metal as well as the thick stuff.

The pros use these same methods when they weld with the high dollar, professional, high amp welders; but it is even more important when you are using a lower amp welder like most of us use.

BTW, never forget that practice and familiarity with your equipment is absolutely necessary...my friend has started to compliment me on my welds and tells me that he could make neater but not a whole lot better welds with his equipment, but couldn't do as good with mine!

SPUDZUKI
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Wow! Thanks everyone :) I was away for the weekend and never got a chance to respond, but thank you all. I've decided to allow someone else to do the major, safety-issue, welding and the other stuff to me. My cousin has a fleet of transport trucks and has a shop that works for him. He said they would weld anything and build anything to my specs, whenever I need it. Nice :) By the way, they also build custom springs and are willing to bend me a set!!! We'll see...
Thanks again guys, the info will help me out a lot.

Cheers!
Steve
 
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