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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to replace the wheel bearings on my 86 CJ7 with manual hubs. Never done this before so I am looking for suggestions and how simple/difficult it is. Do the wheel bearings have to be pressed in/out at a garage or can I get them in and out at home? Is it advisable to do both sides at the same time? I know the right side needs done but I don't know about the left side. Are there inner and outer bearings? Should I replace the seals? Any special instructions before taking the hub off? Thanks

 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
There are inner and outer bearings and a grease seal. You will need to get the race out of the hub using a drift, then just freeze
the new race and heat the hub, should drop or tap right in. As far as taking your locking hub apart, couple snap rings and a spring,
just put everything back how you took it out. Don't forget to grease the locking hub mechanism. One side should take you
about 1/2 hr to an hour if you replace both bearings.

Brad
Get active or get locked out, the choice is yours.
 

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Johnny,
It's fairly simple. I'd recommend getting at least a Chilton's or Haynes manual for you Jeep. They're only about $10-$15 apiece. The manuals usually call for the races to be pressed in but I am not sure if the freezing/heating thing would work. That would be great if it does. You should do both sides and replace the races as well as the bearings. Also the seals. Clean out the hubs really well since you don't want to mix greases when you repack the new bearings. A wheel bearing packer is really convenient and easy to use, only about $5-6 bucks. It hooks right up to a grease gun. Much neater/cleaner than doing it by hand. HTH.
Regards,
rich
fratt77cj7304qtracth400

fratt
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Good info from the other guys. Haynes or Chilton's will be a big help to you. You might also to buy a spindle nut socket ($5-10) for removing the spindle nuts. The first nut has a washer behind it that is bent down to prevent the nut from working loose. Bend that up to loosen the nut. If you don't have/want the spindle nut socket you can use a chise or old screwdriver to help knock the nuts loose, but that generally boogers up (technical term) the nuts some. If you dont have a drift, you can use a chisel but don't scar up the inside of the spindle. Its kind of expensive but do it complete for the side you do...inner & outer Timken bearings and races, seals. You dont necessarily have to do both sides at the same time if your budget doesn't allow it, but I WOULD take the other side apart to see what kinda shape its in and to grease the bearings, particularly the little needle bearings on the inner side of the spindle.
You'll do fine.
Shain

 

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i'm not saying it's a good idea, but i have allways used a brass punch to put the bearing races back in...i have also put the hub in the oven on a baking sheet and the race in the freezer..the wife doesn't even question me anymore..it works good.. i have done this with ball joints too, but that was a cooler of beer, not a freezer..
oh yeah.. make sure the bearing races are ALL the way in..it's easy to put them in "almost" all the way..tighten the inner spindle nut as tight as it gets, then back 1/8 turn...the outer you can torque pretty tight..make sure the wheel still turns, use plenty of grease, but don't pack the whole hub full...if the race of the old bearing was broken, there is a good chance it spun in the hub and destroyed the hub..then you have to get a new hub from a junkyard..not the locking part you get from the parts joint, the part it bolts to that the races go in.use red locktite on the hub bolts and repeat this every time you go wheeling.. it sounds like a lot, but i can do it in my driveway in about 15 min


~~Elusive~~
it's sort of still a cj thingy....
 
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