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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What I\'ve learned about painting

This is for everyone who has been reading up on these post who were contemplating doing it themselves.
I've learned quite a bit from this board.
Here is what i regret doing.
I wouldn't recommend going down to bare metal.It takes a long time if you have quite a few coats underneath.
Make sure you do all body work,No matter how insignifigant you think that scratch is going to be..it's going to get on your nerves later.
I have a few scratches and high/low spots that make the jeep look kinda trashy on one side.It didn't look that bad with the primer.After I laid down the paint it looks horrible.I regret not doing it.Its going to be a hassle if I ever sand it down.
Lay on many thin coats as opposed to heavy coats.
Its easy to get runs and they aren't fun.
Make sure you keep everything as clean as possible.
People on here have told me to wet sand/wash with degreaser/rinse well.
It makes a big difference.Dry sanding and trying to wipe off sanded paint with a dry towl or something like that doesn't work well.
If you are priming,use spray primer from a can.
I probably could have saved some money and definatly some time and my wrist.
Its a lot nicer using a spray gun than a can.You can lay a lot more consistent layers and you can get out much more paint..a lot quicker
Also make sure you have a consistent color of primer :)
Thats what I've learned

Its four wheel drive and naked women what more do you want?
-Dirt Dog
SWB BBS Member Page!(exclamation)
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Re: What I\'ve learned about painting

Amen brother. 90% of painting is the prep work, 5% is skill and the last 5% is luck. /wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif

"We're gonna need a bigger boat." --Jaws
 

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Re: What I\'ve learned about painting

On the money on every point Joey! I assume when you said "Use spray primer from a can" you meant "A (quart) can of primer to be sprayed through a gun...not "spray cans of primer". Just wondering.

Mike H.
1983 CJ-7 Laredo,It's Orange! Now I just have to put it all back together.
 

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Re: What I\'ve learned about painting

Very good in what youve just said Im a painter by trade and the prep work sucks (for lack of better word). But If you want it to look like any thing take your time. When you get good enough at painting then you can load the paint on. I paint signs for a living and they dont have to look like a porche but..... on the more elaborate ones I take my time. If any one has ever been to Key arena in seattle: over the top of the Team shop is a basket ball. That is my pride and joy. And for you people in the Oregon area my Brother and I painted all the Rose Garden Arena parking and "way finding" inside. Ive definatley done some neat stuff. bad part is I have not seen it on display. uh oh this was not suppose to be this long sorry

"If its got tits or tires youre gonna have problems".
I make Half doors, for pics click here http://communities.msn.com/GrimjeepersPage/customhalfdoors.msnw
 

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Re: What I\'ve learned about painting

Yep, I would have to agree totally about the prep work.
I have painted two trucks from the spray can and two trucks with a spray gun powered by an air compressor.
The spray can trucks looked ok, but the paint didn't have a hardener in it and whenever I spilled gas on the paint it washed away.
The spray gun paint has a hardener and a reducer that you mix with it before spraying the paint.
On the spray can trucks I prepped one good, and the other not so good.
Needless to say, the latter had the paint chipping off it within a year.
The only things I have to work on now are perfecting my bondo skills and my painting techniques.
Of course with bondo you want to put on too much instead of too little.
This is because it can be sanded to the proper level and shape quite easily.
The hardest bondo job I had to do was on an old scout 80 we had.
It had HUGE holes below the doors that were about 24"x 5" and 2" to 3" deep.
I ended up southern engineering the holes by stuffing them with newspaper so I wouldn't have to use my entire gallon can of bondo on one hole.
Now that I think of it this was probably a bad thing, because the paper can hold water and rust out even more.
Oh well, it is in another person's hands now.

TX 4X4 club Arlington Chapter
 

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Re: What I\'ve learned about painting

Yep, I would have to agree totally about the prep work.
I have painted two trucks from the spray can and two trucks with a spray gun powered by an air compressor.
The spray can trucks looked ok, but the paint didn't have a hardener in it and whenever I spilled gas on the paint it washed away.
The spray gun paint has a hardener and a reducer that you mix with it before spraying the paint.
On the spray can trucks I prepped one good, and the other not so good.
Needless to say, the latter had the paint chipping off it within a year.
The only things I have to work on now are perfecting my bondo skills and my painting techniques.
Of course with bondo you want to put on too much instead of too little.
This is because it can be sanded to the proper level and shape quite easily.
The hardest bondo job I had to do was on an old scout 80 we had.
It had HUGE holes below the doors that were about 24"x 5" and 2" to 3" deep.
I ended up southern engineering the holes by stuffing them with newspaper so I wouldn't have to use my entire gallon can of bondo on one hole.
Now that I think of it this was probably a bad thing, because the paper can hold water and rust out even more.
Oh well, it is in another person's hands now.

TX 4X4 club Arlington Chapter
 

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Re: What I\'ve learned about painting

Well, Joey. I'll bet you got a lot of satisfaction out of shooting the hood all by yourself.
There is a saying that after your first paint job, you are then a Pro!"/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif

I have a couple of comments on your of your tips/advice that may help next time ...
"People on here have told me to wet sand/wash with degreaser/rinse well. It makes a big difference."
There is controversy as to the use of a degreaser when rinsing.
Guess where the "grease" comes from after sanding ... ???
Some Pros say degreaser leaves an oily residue and that clean water is best ... JUST DON'T PUT YOUR GREASY MITS ON THE SURFACE prior to painting! Even if you have to go to the extent of wearing disposable cotton gloves to move pieces around. *Tip from a classic car restorer friend*
On the same vein, the Pros say to not use paint thinner as a final rinse/wipe ... it can soften primer, filler, putty, etc. Hint: That's why you need the seal coat next. /wwwthreads_images/icons/shocked.gif Oh, the horror stories of red primer oosing up through a fresh white topcoat! /wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif

"Dry sanding and trying to wipe off sanded paint with a dry towl or something like that doesn't work well."
Dry sanding has some advantages in the beginning stages knocking down filler and finding the high and low spots on painted finishes. A lot of times you can see better what is happening and what areas are being cut first.
A 2.5" x 24" two handed auto body sanding plane with velcro backed coarse grit strips is one of my favorite Jeep body work tools. A long, clean horsehair bench brush does a good job of knocking the dust off to the floor. Don't blow on it ... it's not good for your lungs.

If you work too hard smoothing the whole thing before you get the bare metal covered, the difference in hardness of the metal and filler will only cause dips and waves in the surface ... even when using a block sander.
After you get things pretty smooth, shoot etch coat for the bare metal then shoot (at least two heavy coats) prime and fill on there, THEN start sanding these first fill coats down wet.
You can even use a paint brush to prime and fill some of he rough spots first ... just watch out for bubbles ... /wwwthreads_images/icons/frown.gif And of course, after each step ... sand smooth again.

3M red (medium) and grey (fine) are great for dry sanding touch ups just prior to shooting. The grey pad will pull primer down to satin and it's great for contours like the windshild lip where paper might knock off a sharp edge down to metal in an instant. A slightly damp, lintless cloth will pick up most of the touch up dust.

I'm gratified you learned the most important lessons ... taking your time and shoot it clean! Now you know why I suggested you sprinkle down the floors (and even the walls and ceiling of your garage, even the bushes near by) with water. Then going to the extent of a fresh change of clothes and air spraying yourself off before you even get near that body with color in your gun ... /wwwthreads_images/icons/shocked.gif
Lastly, don't forget the tack cloth... applied lightly, so as not to transfer the resin of the cloth to the surface.

If that guy had of come into my garage and started shooting on top of all that grit I probably would have gone postal! /wwwthreads_images/icons/mad.gif Plus, you were ready to do it yourself - the right way. I'll bet you made him clean up his act the second time around ... and you'll do it all by yourself from now on ... /wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif

The very BEST thing you said you learned is that you found out exactly what "Just good enough" really means ... because now you can see how quickly it shows ... /wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif

JAF
http://www.monsterslayer.com/jeep
 

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Re: What I\'ve learned about painting

My Hat's off to you Joey! I really thought this was going to turn out to be a disaster for you, and I.... (this is hard to say)...I WAS WRONG! and I'm glad I was.

Good Job, now Keep That JEEP till the day you die and will it to your Grandson after he's learned all the things you've gone through.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Re: What I\'ve learned about painting

When I was talking about dry sanding and wiping..I meant for the final stages right before you lay paint down.
I don't think wiping off sanding dust with a towel as opposed to washing it off is adequate cleaning.
After I saw how the guy sprayed the paint on I caught on.
I mentioned I would like to keep it clean and make sure everything was right since I had worked so hard on it..He blew it off and said it didn't matter that much.I couldn't bitch much cause he knew more than I did..and he volunteered to help.
I'll definatly do it all myself next time.
Thanks for everyone's advice on bodywork/paint.

Its four wheel drive and naked women what more do you want?
-Dirt Dog
SWB BBS Member Page!(exclamation)
http://www.shortwheelbase.com
 

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Re: What I\'ve learned about painting

Joey, I been thinking about what you learned and I'm a little bothered by something.... and have a littl piece of advise. It ain't about paint, it's about gittn' and givin' advise and help.

Bad advise and bad help is worse than no help or advise at all. That type of advise is the proverbial bum steer.

When people look at you that are older than you they often will blow you off assuming you're just a kid that don't know nothing and keep on a blabbering or mucking up the job.

You've got a couple of choices here. You can be "polite" and let 'em keep on a doing what they were doing. Or, you can be "smart" and stop them.

But before you make those choices remember a couple of things first.

1. You went to them for their expertise, that showed respect to them. They should, in turn, show respect to you by listening and teaching you the corretect way.

2. Just 'cuz you're a kid who's getting the advis/help for free doesn't determine the quality of the adivse/help. See rule number 1 above.

3. If something bothers you about the fix or the help, then stop! Usually you've got a ligitimate question, and a right to voice the question. Untill you recieve an adaquate answer on that problem, don't proceed.

Those who respect you will give you the right to voice an opinion and ask questions. That's called teaching, guiding, mentoring, and serving. Otherwise it's no better than telling someone: "Get outtta my way Kid. I can do it better and faster without you." Don't give that type of person the time of day, even if you get the job done. All you learn from that person is to be bullied, disrespected and that in thier eyes you've not got much talent worth, or sense, all of which ain't true.

4. The guy who stops, considers, and teaches is the guy who's the one to listen to. He's probably got more informaiton, understanding and know-how than the othe type of guy.

5. Remember when you start to give advise/help, which seems like NOW /wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif what type of teacher you want to be.

6. It's better to multiply your tallents and give 'em away than to keep them all tight fisted and close to the chest. After all, we're all in this together and the better you can make it for someone else, the better you make it for yourself.

I'll use TR as an example:

1. He knows what he's doing.
2. He dosen't hesitate to offer his help.
3. He an irrasable old coot and ain't about to change.
4. He does stop and give more than adquate information when asked.
5. When you're done with his communications you've been educated.

Throw out Item 4 & 5, and I don't care who he is, he's an ass that shouldn't be given the time of day. But with Items 4 & 5 in the list, he's all right in my book.

Lecture over... now keep fixin' the Jeep.

 
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Re: What I\'ve learned about painting

Joey, it almost brings a tear to my eye. Doesn't it just suck that some lessons have to be learned the hard way./wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif It sounds like your next autobody/paint experience will be lot better.

Cage Up, Wheels Down
Jeepfiend
All my Jeeps are in pieces!
 
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