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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone ever turned the yokes on a axle, particularly a Scout Dana 44 front axle, to get more caster and to help driveline angle. I have read two articles on the ORC tech pages (on the Jeep and Scout section). I was wandering how hard it is and how much should I rotate the yokes. I want to improve driveline angle when I do a SOA and and want better handleing. Thanks.

Tim Springer
1980 CJ7
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/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif I wouldn't THINK of telling you that it is anything like easy. Lots of grinding and re-welding. As your transfer case rises relative to the axle, you MUST roll the differential up to keep the front U-Joint at ZERO angle (more or less). THEN you roll the trunions to regain the caster adjustment. It's just something that has to be done. It's only super-difficult when you THINK about it, doing it isn't as bad. /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif

CJDave
I never believe any statistics unless my moonguys /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif/wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif made 'em up themselves.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just finished doing this with scout d44 for my 89 wrangler. It took me 2 nites after work to do the job (not to hard at all). All the work was done with a 4.5" angle grinder, using both a grinding wheel and a few 1/16" cut off wheels that fit the grinder. Basically start at the outer edge of the weld and grind toward the center of the weld near the tube. I needed to push the grinder into the yoke about 1/4 to 3/8" to remove the weld. You will begin to faintly see a darker line between the tube and yoke when you have gone far enough. you need to get this to show the whole way around to get the yoke to move. Since doing it i've heard that spraying wd-40 helps visualize the line better. It is supposed to migrate into the space between the tube/yoke and show it better. After i got both yokes freed up, i began twisting them with a large hammer. Becareful not to damage the yoke. I used an angle finder to establish the positive caster. I determined that the spring pads and the pionion were parallel on my axle. I then proceeded to rotate (with hammer) the yokes to 10 degrees. I will place 6 degree wedges under the spring pads to rotate the pinion up 6 degrees. this will give me 4 degrees of positive caster. I have come to find out that the '80 scout front d44 came with 3 degrees of pos. caster. So, it is up to you to determine your amount of caster, maybe some others can offer advice on this. I understand that it does help to have increased caster when dealing with increased lift and tire size. I think the 4 degrees i will have will be good. Next get a top notch welder to do the work (if you are not). Make sure he uses the correct rod, makes several passes (3 ), and heats the material up as little as possible. My welder made a 1/4 rotation pass then would do the oppisite side immediately, then do the rest in this fasion. This is the point where i am at. I need to start putting it back together now. Becareful not to grind into the tube, and be as precise as posible with your measurements. I must have rechecked everything a thousand times. Oh yeah, i checked the caster by placing a straight bar through the yoke. I needed to move the pinion up 6 degrees because of the height of the front output on the t.case. best of luck jameydan

 

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it was actually easier for me to pound the yokes off and pound them back on at the correct angle.. i couldn't get them to turn to save my life....also...becarefull not to grind into the axle housing while you are grinding on the welds


~~Elusive~~
it's sort of still a cj thingy....
 
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