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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's what I know about a torque converter
1. My truck has one
2. Fluid goes in it
3. It can "die" and prevent a vehicle from operating

Anybody have an introductory good and clear (or poor and cryptic
) explaination of what a torque converter is and what it does?

Thanks!
 

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I am woring on a tech article for this, but here is the simple version:

the T/C bolts to the engine via the flywheel. When the engine turns it will spin the outside shell of the T/C at engine speed. Internally the outside shell has fins line a fan. when it spins they will force the fluid to move around thus turning a second set of fins that are attached to the input shaft of the tranny. The fluid will pass out and go into the tranny go through the filter and hysrolics of the tranny and will reenter the T/C to start all over.

This is very basic but it is like two fans. Your engine spins one fan which causes air to flow thriugh and turn a second fans attached to your tranny.

Clear as MUD?
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Havack,
Yeah, I've done some reading on it this morning and understand more how it works. Two fans and viscous fluid so I guess my real question is - why do we have one? I wouldn't think that we'd need to have one of these in our trucks, first because I have a manual tranny but... does it have something to do with the xfer case and 4wd?

The way things bolt up look as follows? :

Engine : torque converter : transfer case : tranny : rear differential

Where the front differential is attached to the flow via the xfer case.

Get that diagram?
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Actually it's Engine:Torgue Converter:Tranny:Transfer case:Rear differential

The purpose of the T/C is to prevent your engine from dying at idle. With a manual tranny, the clutch is used to disconnect the driveline from the engine to keep the engine going at idle. The T/C does the exact same thing. All it does is disconnect the driveline from the engine at idle so that it doesn't die. Just think of two fans facing each other. If you turn one fan on the other one will start to turn. The T/C is simply two fans facing each other. One fan will shoot fluid into the other one, thus turning it and the driveline.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you have a manual tranny then you do not have a torque converter. A torque converter is only used in an automatic tranny it replaces the clutch in a manual tranny. So auto torque converter, manual clutch. Hope this helps and Good Luck,
 

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That's right. The torque convertor is the heart of why you would want an auto vs. manual. It is the clutch so to speak. It works on that job, so we don't have to. The convertor, and all the hydraulics and the larger housing needed for all this are why autos are usually always heavier, and more complex (read potentially more problematic) compared to manuals.
 

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The convertor, and all the hydraulics and the larger housing needed for all this are why autos are usually always heavier, and more complex (read potentially more problematic) compared to manuals.


this is why i prefer my 4 speed plus with it i know she wont drive it
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The torque converter does a lot more than prevent the engine from dieing at idle. The main advantage of the torque converter is that it allows the input shaft and output shaft to spin at different speeds. This allows the engine to spin much faster gaining enough torque (hence the name) to get the vehicle moving. As the vehicle increases in speed, the demand on the engine is less, and the input and output shafts of the converter progressively turn closer to the same speed. At cruising speeds, a locking converter will lockup as described earlier creating a direct 1:1 input and output ratio between the engine and transmission. A non-locking converter, however, will never achieve a true 1:1 ratio for any gear. This is one reason why manuals are better on gas since the engine and transmission are always in a 1:1 ratio while driving.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Speaking of locking up..... My E4OD started to lock up too early (around 20 mph). After taking it to mechanics who's advice ranged from getting a new T/C to buying a new tranny to needing a new TPS, I did research on the internet and found the product I needed. Jet Performance sells what is called an E4OD Lockup Delay Module. It solved the problem and I was able to set the speed At which I'd like it to lock up. It was kind of a band aid but it was much cheaper than finding an honest mechanic. It's been running perfect for 2 years now.
 
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