Off Roading Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Which is a more usefull tool in the workshop? I've had a welder and I use a cut off wheel to cut most of my metal, but I am planning on building rock skids and rear bumper/ tire carrier. I would like a tool that allows me to cut good angles. I could use the torch to work under the Jeep and when bolts are rusted I can heat them up to hopefully get them out. I was thinking about getting a compound miter and putting a metal cutting blade on it. However the saw is probably more money and I can't use it under the Jeep, but I could use it in the woodshop. So which is the best option in your honest opinion. Thanks.

Tim Springer
1980 CJ7
WALSTIB/wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The gas torch is the most useful for the $$....but those chop saws sure do make clean cuts....sounds like you should get both....
However, have you considered a plasma cutter? You can cut pretty straight (or curved) with those.

John......southern CA
84CJ7, 3"lift, 32"BFG, 4.10's, ARB Locker, Solid Axle's, Durabak
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I vote for gas torch and a cheap metal cutting chop saw.
Plasma cutters are nice but they are expensive and only do one thing.
Compound mitre saws are meant to cut wood not metal. If you use it for metal it will get ruined. There are too many moving parts and adjustable thingies on a wood saw, the metal dust would get into everything. In order for it to be effective it would have to be 14in. or larger and now your talking more money than a torch and chop saw combined.
I tried a metal blade on my 10 in. mitre saw, it took forever to get thru the piece and the metal dust got into the rotating table making it a non-rotating table. It was one I had worn out from trimming houses so no big loss. The next day I was at the tool store, picked up a metal saw for $120, it has an adjustable fence so you can cut mitres too. If you need a compound cut just get it close with the saw and finish it off with the torch or a handheld grinder.
hope this helps
CTjeepnut

Funny thing is, the more I practice, the luckier I get
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I ran into the same problem when I was getting started. A chop saw is handy (don't get the $100 harbor freight one it is a sick joke) but if you can get on tool get a torch. When you get good with it it will be one of the best tools you have. Now I have both and a really want to get a bandsaw. If I had it to do over I'd probably get a decent bandsaw instead of my crappy chopsaw. The bandsaw is heading for te garbage as soon a I find a bandsaw I like. I still love my Victor JOurneyman torch, need to refill my tanks one of these days though. Happy Jeepin'
Travis

Inquire about my witty original saying contest/wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I bought a 14" chopsaw from Harbor Freight, has worked very well. A torch is next on my list.

 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My vote is hit a pawn shop for the torch setup and the chop saw. I see torches every time I hit the pawn shops (not very often) and most of them are in really good shape. The chop saw might be harder to find though.

 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I use a metal cutting band saw (an import with a 3/4 HP motor). It was $160 ten years ago and they are still $160 everywhere around this area. It has a solid fence with a good clamp. I put wheels on one end of it so I can push it under the workbench when not in use. Torch is next. How do you use a torch set with propane? Can you cut with propane and oxygen?

 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Have you ever considered a hand held bandsaw? I have had a Rockwell (porter-cable) porta band for over 20 years now. Every one who borrows my bandsaw ends up buying their own within a couple months. I don't have an electric chop saw anymore, I could not stand the dirt that got all over the shop and in my lungs. I have built a couple of tube frames for type 1-2 1600 buggies, the band saw works great on 4130 tubing, the big plus is you can cut on the vehicle with out getting burn marks on the paint.
good luck, jjc

 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
How well does a band saw work at cutting angles? Also can it handle 1/8" thick 2x4 square tube? Thanks.

Tim Springer
1980 CJ7
WALSTIB/wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,394 Posts
/wwwthreads_images/icons/laugh.gif I feel like I'm watching two people discuss the merits of a violin and a ball peen hammer....they are two very different things.....for two very different purposes. I have done shop work for fourty-five years without a chop saw. I could not LIVE without a torch. I cannot BELIEVE this discussion/wwwthreads_images/icons/laugh.gif and my moonguys are just shaking their little round yellow heads/wwwthreads_images/icons/laugh.gif

CJDave
Quadra-Trac modified by the crack moonguy/wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif/wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif transfer case team.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
To anserw the quetion on how well a porta-band will cut tubing, cutt off 4x4, coumpound mitre 2x3, wall thickness 1/4" . this is the best overall tool I have found for cutting box and round tubing, it can notch and do compound cuts, leaves very little in the way of burrs, quiet and clean. If I could have only one of the above mentioned tools it would be the oxy-acetylene torch, both cut and weld (before TIG welding was accepted gas welding was the FAA approved method of welding 4130 tube airframes). If I could have a second tool it would definitely would be the porta-band.
good luck, jjc

 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top