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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
T.R. you have covered allot of ground but I would love to hear what you think
of the different plug wires.
I try to find Autolite or Belden wires.
NAPA handles Belden wires I think.
I use Autolite because of the luck with there plugs.
And Belden[sp] because of it is a well know for there wire
for use in Eletric Co.
I know that not much but all I had to go on.
 

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I have had good with accel's (spelling?) 8mm kit that you get to cut your own lengths and picks your boots.

/wwwthreads_images/icons/cool.gif Big Ed
'88 YJ, 4" susp,3" body,33's,283 Chevy V8,TH350,4.11's,D30,D35c
 

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Plug wires are one area where the aftermarket is ahead of the factory by about 10 years.
Plug wire technology has advanced so much in the past 20 years, and there are so many places still using 1940's technology that it's hard to tell anymore.
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There is one hard & fast rule to plug wires for modern High Energy Ignitions.
NEVER, EVER USE A SOLID CORE PLUG WIRE, NO MATTER WHAT !!
If it's solid wire inside, leave it for the tractor or lawn mower it was meant for!
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The factory goes to great pains to test plug wires just to see how little they can get away with. They use the minimum quality insulation they can get away with and still keep the vehicle running without RF noise problems, and with out so much voltage leaking out of them the vehicle quits running.
The factory goes to great pains to make sure that the vehicle lives through the warranty period, and that is all. They would prefer you brought you vehicle back to the dealership two days after the warranty ran out for a new complete drive train. They make a lot of money on replacement parts.
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NOW THAT IS OUT OF MY SYSTEM...
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There are some really good plug wires out there.
For a standard, factory style, High Energy Ignition,
(GM HEI, Ford TFI, Any of the aftermarket 'Super Coils')
The discount parts store brand of lifetime warranty plug wires will probably be all right.
(The $20 price tag makes them attractive for an upgrade you are not quite sure about, also)
The only exception to the factory plug wires I have seen is the Autolite plug wires. They have generally the same quality as the consumer brands of life time warranty wires.
I must admit, Autolite has some good coil and spark plug boots....
The next level is the aftermarket premium wires, like Accel, Taylor, Moroso, ect.

I know Accel has a Fiber/ Graphite core, and I'm not nuts about that. It's only one step up from the old solid graphite core wires that were ruined the first time you bent them past 45 degrees. They run about $25 a set.
I know Taylor has some sort of spiral core wire, but I can't get them to give me any real details. I know Taylor has some cool colors, and the street rod guys use a lot of them. They run about $50 a set though.
I know Moroso is usually a good quality brand name, and their Blue Max brand of plug wires has a 'Helical Wound Core', fancy term for Heli-Core. They won't give up specifics of what is in the core, and they make some claims about being the #1 plug wire for NASCAR I wouldn't want to defend in court if MSD got upset... These plug wires are between $50 and $70 a set.
They are of variable quality, and the features change so fast I can't keep up with them.
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Ford Motorsports/ SVO has a set of plug wires that will do better than most all of the general aftermarket plug wires. I prefer these as #2 right behind the MSD wires. The only draw back is they are pre-made and only come in sets for Ford engines. Ford used some strange boot angles too. At about $40 a set, they aren't priced too bad either.
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We use three kinds of MSD plug wires, and nothing else unless the customer just insists on it. There are some plug wires we wont use at all, no matter if the customer wants them or not... (I'm not going to zap them in a public forum, so don't ask...)
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THE MSD 8.5 MM Super Conductor Wires, at about $60 a set. Work great, don't leak even at the boots. These are our workhorse wires. We have put them on just about everything, and they work great. Very low resistance so they don't consume the spark energy, and don't make noise for the radio or vehicle computers. They will even hold back the MSD 7 series modules without leaking.
The only draw back here is they only come in RED! And I MEAN RED!

THE MSD wires we put on most street driven vehicles is the MSD blue 8 MM wire.
These are VERY good plug wires, and do a GREAT job for us. Low resistance, no leakage, holds back the 6 series CDI modules without eating my arm off, have great clips on both ends, and great boots. Comes with the crimper for making custom length wires.
Has a FIVE YEAR WARRANTY!
Blue only, and around $50 a set.

THE MSD gray wires. I bought about a hundred sets two or three years ago, and I haven't seen them in the catalogs for a couple of years now. We use them on all of our personal stuff. About 8 MM and capable of dealing with the MSD 6 series modules, these were the economy wires of MSD's line. I don't have a price.
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I was asked a direct question, and...
Just one man's opinion. If you don't agree, then don't agree.....

If Chris Columbus "Discovered" America (with 25 million already here), Can I Go "Discover" Florida?
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank You very much for your advice. I have been told on this list or some where
that Taylor is a good wire but if you look at the grades[prices] they go
from low to very high[price]. Then a guy don't know where to draw the line.
I myself will not pay $100 plus for plug wires for a street engine $50 to $60 don't sound to bad. I have been reading and rereading your ignition post.
You JUST don't fine this type of information with out someone trying to
sell you something.
 

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Like I told the other guy, normally I don't mark parts up,
I do normally get $60 to $100 Hr. to give advice/ work on stuff.....
Shop time is $60 Hr. and the Dyno is $100 Hr. from the time you walk through the door until you walk through the door.

You can't go wrong with the MSD blue wires from Summit, but that is just my opinion. Around $50.

This is all pretty basic stuff, but I'm getting 70 to 150 emails a week privately from people that work as mechanics that say exactly the same thing you just said in public.

I piss a lot of guys off, because not only do I tell them they are wrong all of these years, I explain it to them so they don't have a leg to stand on for their argument...
(You are not right unless you can PROVE you are right, and prove it in a way everybody can understand.)
I get A LOT of converts.
They get mad....
They get over being mad, and then they get a lot smarter all at once...
That's good for me, because then maybe they will teach me something...

I don't know squat about the 'proper' T-case to use, or the 'correct' axles for a FWD.
Everybody has an opinion, and opinions are like a$$holes, everybody has one, and they all stink! I need facts, and I need them presented in a way I can't miss the point...
I'm a little slow sometimes when I first learn, but once I get a hold, LOOK OUT!

BTW, I don't know if the offer is on the level, but I got an email offer to write a comprehensive book on ignitions...
I hope it's real, because I have nothing but time until September when my back surgery is due...
I swear all I would have to do is go back and pull the posts off of this board, and the book would already be written...

Later dudes, I'm off to Daytona in a few hours. If I get slack time, I may jump on my note book and see what's going on here.... NOT!

Aaron.

If Chris Columbus "Discovered" America (with 25 million already here), Can I Go "Discover" Florida?
 
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