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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently aquired a Honda 200 3 wheeler, I used to ride these in the Imperial Dunes,and this one is so unused that the original tires have 95% tread, but are cracked from age.
I live in the Sierra's now, and will probably use it most in snow, and have heard they do ok.
What types of tires are recommended by experienced snow riders?
Is a smooth sand tire with the single giant rib good for the front?
The back, chevrons or paddles?

To Email, leave my Mom out of it.
 
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YOU WILL END UP PUSHING THE FRONT TIRE. TRY SOMETHING A BIT MORE AGGRESSIVE. YOUR PLANS FOR THE REAR SOUND O.K.
EVER THOUGHT ABOUT FINDING A LAKE WITH A LOT OF ICE AND RUNNING AROUND THERE. IN THE WINTER I PREFER ICE TO SNOW. I JUST DON'T LIKE GETTING STUCK. SNOW HAS A TENDENCY TO DO THAT. FOUR STROKES HOOK-UP ON ICE SURPRISINGLY WELL. STUD THE FRONT AND LEAVE THE BACK CLEAN.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the advice.
The snow here in the Sierra (cement) is usually a bit wetter and heavier than what falls, say at Aspen and points east. I can often float my Jeepster on it, although 4 tire chains, winch, shovel, food, radio,etc, are an important part of the kit.
Ice riding sounds like a blast, but the only lakes in the Sierra's that get ice thick enough for safe traversing are usually far from plowed roads, and require a snow cat to get in. We seldom get temperatures below 10 degrees F, at altitude.

The front tire I am refering to has a smooth carcass, with about a 3 inch high, 1 inch thick rib in the center. I dont think too agressive a tread would allow floatation, and the front brake would dig a hole. Actually a front ski might be good, but hard to turn.
I will try the stock knobby in front first.

To Email, leave my Mom out of it.
 
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