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Hi

I'm trying to figure out if my Dad is a Vietnam Era Vet or an "in country" Vietnam Vet without asking him. Is there really a strong distinction between the two?

I know he served on the USS Ranger in the Navy in the early 70's.

I'm wanting to get him a Vietnam Vet sticker to display on his truck but I'm not sure if it would be approporiate if he's not a "in country" Vet.

Thanks
Patrick
 

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Does your dad talk about ‘nam?

Most of us Vietnam era vets would rather just forget that war and even that those times ever happened.
 

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Please keep comments like this to PM's at best. You don't know Taz any better than I do and I won't have anyone shooting down vets on this section of the BBS.

DD
 

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Post deleted for lack of further need.

Taz
 

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Though I don't like Taz, Krabby that was way over the line
. Taz, whether or not you saw action, though it was the AF, and if it is true: Thanks For serving, you actually gain a few points for it.
 

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I'll stick up for Taz on this on too.

Kraby's remarks are way out of line... Had I been a moderator, I'd ban 'em for this remark.

Never, Never, Never, need I repeat NEVER attack a man's military record unless you've proof he's lying. Then he's fair game...

IMHO, you owe Taz a heartfelt apology.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
Thanks For serving, you actually gain a few points for it.

[/ QUOTE ]

I am not deserving of your thanks nor of gaining any points. I didn't have a choice in the matter.

The only choice I had was to enlist in another branch or be drafted into the army, I chose to enlist in the Air Force. I was in a delayed enlistment program where I could sign up but they had 90 days to induct me. I got the "Greetings" letter during that 90 days but was already enlisted though not active.

Other than the low pay (they instituted a $100 across the board raise after I got out) it wasn't a bad time. I got plenty of action but didn't see any of the kind you mean. Hey, it was the free love generation.

Because of the delayed enlistment program, my service time for the purposes of pay was considered to begin on the day that I enlisted. SSgt over 4 for the last 3 months wasn't bad pay.
 

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My Daddy did the same thing during WWII. He knew he would be drafted so Joined the AAC so he could keep working on planes. They made him a pilot (also at Macdill) and trained him to bomb Tokyo. Just as His group was ready to head for Japan, they dropped the big one and canceled his trip. He never went overseas while in the Air Corps. Was he a WWII veteran? You bet your ass! My older brother got drafted in '69, He was on the fast track to a body bag until they found out he could type and has well above average intelligence. He never went overseas while in the Army. Is he a Viet Nam veteran? Yes he is! If one is in the service during a war, one is a veteran of that war. The War doesn't just happen on the battle ground. Whatever War this country is involved in starts in this country and ends in this country (eventually, I hope, the Korean conflict has yet to be finished, My best buddy and neighbor served in the AF in the mid 90's so he is a Korean war Vet.) I was lucky/young enough to just miss the Draft for Viet Nam and old enough now that I probably won't be considered for the next draft (any day now it seems).
 

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Thor,

After posting my response above, I remembered posting this reply several months ago.

Not only standing up for someone you harbor distaste for but being the first to do so is a more than admirable quality. Now, I find disappointment in myself for that hastily made statement and I apologize.
 

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Apology accepted, and yes, you still deserve the thanks. Though before you invite me over for tea, I still dislike you and think you are mostly a Dick


























Clark.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
Apology accepted, and yes, you still deserve the thanks. Though before you invite me over for tea, I still dislike you and think you are mostly a Dick

Clark.

[/ QUOTE ]

I ain't gonna
you either. Just correcting an injustice.

No Dick

Clark here. I only wish I'd aged as well.
 

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Taz can post whatever he wants but I will never forget this post:
Quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

When I spent my 4 years in the military, what I heard the most, almost daily, was, “Lifer equals loser.” I guess some things never change.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



this is really the statement that kept me up all night last night. I usually sleep through the jets doing operations around here, but last night I just could not get over the fact that the "great American patriot" Taz is calling me a loser because I want to retire from the Marine Corps.
Go tell my wife and daughter that the YEARS they have had to function without me is because I am a loser. Tell the people of Bosnia, Croatia, and some the other 22 countries I have been to that I am a loser.
You brag about your worthless 4 years of service like it gives you a right to judge Marines in combat.
 

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Ground Hog is an idiot, and he's revolting at best, and a liar at worst...
I can't see Ground Hog as anything in the military but an embarrassment they had to send home for wetting the bed...

----------------

Unless your dad was Special Warfare (SpecWar) he spent his time on a ship...
That's not exactly 'In Country' with the Grunts, but a lot of pilots were tasked with 'Ground Support' so if he was a pilot, it's possible he worked with grunts from time to time.

If he was a POW for any length of time, he's definitely an 'In Country' vet.
----------------

I don't really differentiate between 'In Country' and 'In Service'...
It takes 18 people either stateside or in transportation to supply each and every 'Front Line' soldier, so when we are all part of the same team it's kind of rude to say, "You were only the water or laundry boy"...

I know I couldn't have made it with out mail, clean socks, hot ammo, 'horse pills' and drinking water, so saying the guy delivering that stuff to me wasn't on the team is WAY out of bounds...

I hear the arguments at the VFW all the time, (mostly from useless drunks) that one military occupation was more important than another...
I don't buy it!
We need librarians, clerks, medical techs and intelligence as well as shooters.
(Amazingly, you don't see many 'shooters' sitting on bar stools arguing)

You can't say the guys mixing the defoliants (like agent orange) or the guys arming the aircraft on ships were any less wounded than the guys getting shot on the 'front line'.
------------------------

This post is WAY off topic, but like the rest of the stuff here lately, A way to pass the time...

I wouldn't worry about if your dad was "In Country" as much as I'd worry that you haven't let him know how grateful you are that he raised you right...
Viet-Nam is over, you are still a work in progress for him, so let him know how you feel about his service and the job he, and all the guys he served with are appreciated.
That will give him some assurance you are turning out to be a good man.
 

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Patrick,

I'm considered by the VA as a Vietnam Era Vet, even though I never left the US during my term of active duty in the US Army, because my hitch ended before June 30, 1975. I found this out when I applied for a job with the local transit authority about a year later. They added points towards my test score because of it.

I'm sure your Dad qualifies to be a era vet; I can ask some friends at work who are in country vets; perhaps they know if the Ranger was stationed off the Vietnam Coast during that time and what the status of the sailors aboard are. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif
 

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what i could find for the USS Ranger CV-61 for the vietnam era +/- a few years:

*************************************************8

....The next seven months were filled with intensive training along the western seaboard in preparation for operations in the troubled waters of Southeast Asia. Ranger departed Alameda on 9 November 1962 for brief operations off Hawaii, and then proceeded, via Okinawa, to the Philippines. She steamed to the South China Sea 1 May 1963 to support possible Laotian operations. When the political situation in Laos relaxed 4 May, she resumed her operations schedule with the Seventh Fleet.
Arriving at Alameda from the Far East 14 June 1963, she underwent overhaul in the San Francisco Naval Shipyard 7 August 1963 through 10 February 1964. Refresher training out of Alameda commenced 25 March, interrupted by an operational cruise to Hawaii from 19 June to 10 July.
Ranger again sailed for the Far East 6 August 1964. This deployment came on the heels of the unprovoked assault against USS Maddox (DD-731) on the night of 2 August and, two nights later, against both Maddox and USS Turner Joy (DD-951), by North Vietnamese motor torpedo boats. In retaliation for this aggression on the high seas by North Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson, on 5 August, directed the Navy to strike bases used by the North Vietnamese naval craft. As Ranger steamed from the western seaboard, some 60 attack sorties rose from the decks of USS Ticonderoga (CVA-14) and USS Constellation (CVA-64).
Ranger made only an eight-hour stop in Pearl Harbor 10 August 1964, then hurried on to Subic Bay, and then to Yokosuka, Japan. In the latter port on 17 October 1964, she became flagship of Rear Adm. Miller who commanded Fast Carrier Task Force 77. In the following months, she helped the Seventh Fleet continue its role of steady watchfulness to keep open the sealanes for the Allies and stop Communist infiltration by sea.
On 7 February 1965, in retaliation for a damaging Viet Cong attack on installations around Pleiku, a fighter bomber strike, launched from Ranger, USS Coral Sea (CV 43), and USS Hancock (CV 19), blasted the military barracks and staging areas near Dong Hoi in the southern sector of North Vietnam

Gen. William Westmoreland, commanding the Military Advisory Command in Vietnam, visited Ranger on 9 March 1965 to confer with Rear Adm. Miller. Ranger continued air strikes on enemy inland targets until 13 April when a fuel line broke, ignited and engulfed her No. 1 main machinery room in flames. The fire was extinguished in little over an hour. There was one fatality. Ranger put into Subic Bay 15 April and sailed on the 20th for Alameda, arriving home on 6 May. She entered the San Francisco Naval Shipyard 13 May 1965 and remained there under overhaul until 30 September.

Following refresher training, Ranger departed Alameda on 10 December 1965 to rejoin the Seventh Fleet. She and her embarked Carrier Air Wing 14 received the Navy Unit Commendation for exceptionally meritorious service during combat operations in Southeast Asia from 10 January to 6 August 1966.

Ranger departed the Gulf of Tonkin 6 August for Subic Bay, and steamed via Yokosuka for Alameda, arriving on the 25th. She stood out of San Francisco Bay 28 September and entered Puget Sound Naval Shipyard two days later for overhaul. The carrier departed Puget Sound 30 May 1967 for training out of San Diego and Alameda. On 21 July 1967, she logged her 88,000th carrier landing.

From June until November, Ranger underwent a long and intensive period of training designed to make her fully combat ready. Attack Carrier Air Wing 2 (CVW-2) embarked on 15 September 1967, with the new A-7 Corsair II jet attack plane and the UH-2C Seasprite turboprop rescue helicopter, making Ranger the first carrier to deploy with these powerful new aircraft. From carrier refresher training for CVW-2, Ranger proceeded to fleet exercise Moon Festival. From 9 to 16 October 1967, the carrier and her air wing participated in every aspect of a major fleet combat operation.

Her efficiency honed to a fine edge, Ranger departed Alameda 4 November 1967 for WestPac. Arriving Yokosuka 21 November, she relieved USS Constellation and sailed for the Philippines on the 24th. After arriving at Subic Bay on 29 November, she made final preparations for combat operations in the Tonkin Gulf. Commander, Carrier Division 3, embarked on 30 November as Commander, TG 77.7; and Ranger departed Subic Bay on 1 December for Yankee Station.

Arriving on station 3 December 1967, Ranger commenced another period of sustained combat operations against North Vietnam. During the next 5 months, her planes hit a wide variety of targets, including ferries, bridges, airfields and military installations. Truck parks, rail facilities, antiaircraft guns and SAM sites were also treated to doses of Air Wing 2's firepower. Bob Hope's ""Christmas Show"" came to Ranger in Tonkin Gulf on 21 December. Another welcome break in the intense pace of operations came with a call at Yokosuka during the first week of April 1968. Returning to Yankee Station on 11 April 1968, Ranger again struck objectives in North Vietnam.

After five months of intensive operations, Ranger called at Hong Kong 5 May 1968 and then steamed for home. There followed a shipyard availability at Puget Sound that ended with Ranger's departure 29 July for San Francisco. Three months of leave, upkeep and training culminated in another WestPac deployment 26 October 1968 through 17 May 1969. She departed Alameda on yet another WestPac deployment in December 1969 and remained so employed until 18 May 1970 at which time she returned to Alameda, arriving 1 June 1970.

Ranger spent the rest of the summer engaged in operations off the west coast, departing for her sixth WestPac cruise 27 September 1970. On 10 March 1971, Ranger, along with USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63), set a record of 233 strike sorties for one day in action against North Vietnam. During April, the three carriers assigned to Task Force 77 — Ranger, Kitty Hawk, and Hancock — provided a constant two-carrier posture on Yankee Station. Hours of employment remained unchanged with one carrier on daylight hours and one on the noon to midnight schedule. Strike emphasis was placed on the interdiction of major Laotian entry corridors to South Vietnam. She returned to Alameda 7 June 1971 and remained in port for the rest of 1971 and the first five months of 1972 undergoing regular overhaul.

On 27 May 1972 she returned to west coast operation until 16 November, when she embarked upon her seventh WestPac deployment. On 18 December 1972 Linebacker II operations were initiated when negotiations in the Paris peace talks stalemated. Participating carriers were Ranger, USS Enterprise (CVN 65), USS Saratoga (CV 60), USS Oriskany (CV 34), and USS America (CV 66).

The Linebacker II operations ended on 29 December when the North Vietnamese returned to the peace table. These operations involved the resumed bombing of North Vietnam above the 20th parallel and was an intensified version of Linebacker I. The reseeding of the mine fields was resumed and concentrated strikes were carried out against surface-to-air missile and antiaircraft artillery sites, enemy army barracks, petroleum storage areas, Haiphong naval and shipyard areas, and railroad and truck stations. Navy tactical air attack sorties under Linebacker II were centered in the coastal areas around Hanoi and Haiphong. There were 505 Navy sorties in this area during Linebacker II. Between 18 and 22 December the Navy conducted 119 Linebacker II strikes in North Vietnam. Bad weather was the main limiting factor on the number of tactical air strikes flown during Linebacker II.

On 27 January 1973, the Vietnam cease-fire, announced four days earlier, came into effect and Oriskany, America, Enterprise and Ranger, on Yankee Station, cancelled all combat sorties into North and South Vietnam. During the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam conflict (starting in 1961 and ending on 2 January 1973) the Navy lost 726 fixed-wing aircraft and 13 helicopters to hostile action. The Marine Corps lost 193 fixed-wing aircraft and 270 helicopters to enemy action during the same period. Operation Homecoming, the repatriation of U.S. POWs between 27 January and 1 April 1973, began and North Vietnam and the Viet Cong released 591 POWs. Of the 591 POWs released during Operation Homecoming, 145 were Navy personnel, all but one of whom were Naval Aviation personnel.

Ranger returned to Alameda in August 1973 and remained in that area through 7 May 1974 when she deployed again to the western Pacific, returning to homeport on 18 October. On 28 May 1976, while on deployment, helicopters crews from HS-4 aboard Ranger, detachments from HC-3 on USS Camden (AOE 2), USS Mars (AFS 1) and USS White Plains (AFS 4), and helicopters from NAS Cubi Point, Republic of the Philippines, assisted in Philippine disaster relief efforts in the flood ravaged areas of central Luzon. Over 1,900 people were evacuated; more than 370,000 pounds of relief supplies and 9,340 gallons of fuel were provided by Navy and Air Force helicopters.

On 12 July 1976, Ranger and her escort ships of Task Force 77.7 entered the Indian Ocean and were assigned to operate off the coast of Kenya in response to a threat of military action in Kenya by Ugandan forces.
Ranger entered the history books on 21 March 1983 when an an all-woman flight crew flying a C-1A Trader from VRC-40 ""Truckin' Traders"" landed aboard the carrier. The aircraft was commanded by Lt. Elizabeth M. Toedt and the crew included Lt.(j.g.) Cheryl A. Martin, Aviation Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Gina Greterman and Aviation Machinist's Mate Airman Robin Banks.

**********************************

hope that helps!
 

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[ QUOTE ]

Taz can post whatever he wants but I will never forget this post:

[/ QUOTE ]

I don't intend to spoil this thread any further than it already has been. You can revive the thread where I posted it, start a new thread or wait until this current thread goes dormant and revive it. I will however caution you about forcing further discussion of the matter, you may not like where we go.
 

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"we" aren't going anywhere.
congrats.. you have single handeldly ruined a good jeep forum.
enjoy your misery. I'm out of here.
 

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I said it before, and I'll say it again...

"PUT GROUND HOG ON THE "IGNORE IDIOTS" LIST"

You will be !MUCH! happier in the long run!
No sense stressing out over a tired, old, militia wanna-be.
 

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[ QUOTE ]

I said it before, and I'll say it again...

"PUT GROUND HOG ON THE "IGNORE IDIOTS" LIST"

You will be !MUCH! happier in the long run!
No sense stressing out over a tired, old, militia wanna-be.

[/ QUOTE ]

indeed! its blissful!

he's the only one i have that for.....rarely will i read anything he posts anymore. when other people qoute him in a reply, its clear that im not missing anything!

block him, and once you get over the curiousity of "what did he post this time...maybe it was useful?" you will be much happier.

and maybe someday taz will realize he's failed to impress anyone here or make friends...and he'll go away.....

that or the authorities will raid he mothers basement for his knowledge of UFO technology and he'll die in "what appears to be a suicide"

either way its WIN-WIN.....
 
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