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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hay been thinking for day or two about what you said about making a SB Chevy live a long useful life???
Part II A crate SB are made in Mexico or some of them are. I have been told that they are a softer block
than a block made here in the US. Are they a shorter life engine???I have one in my 67 chevy and
at 70,000Mi. it doing fine . I figered when I bought it if I can get 100.000Mi. for the $1,100 that I was
ahead of the game.
Enlighten us wise one/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif
 

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Gregg after "Yoda" answers your question I'm gonna se if he'll do my taxes and give me some lottery numbers./wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif
Dave have you been busy(more so than normal) lately?
Not as many posts/replys as normal.
See we do care./wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif

85'CJ7 258 4" runnin33's
 

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/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif Yep, we has been real busy. On top of everything else we have been getting the final pieces to the smog system assembled on the intake manifold here on the bench. So much stuff, so many hoses. It isn't that it is difficult, but I'm trying to make it look uncluttered, and that takes more time and more trips to the auto parts, which from up here is a fer piece./wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif /wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gifWith regards to SB Chevys....As I mentioned, I'm not really a Chevy man, but I DO know how to overcome some built-in deficiencies and getting a long-term engine. FIRST....you only use the Hvy Duty engines, with the exhaust valve rotators and the larger stems, and the four-bolt mains and the steel crank. THEN....if it is going in a stick shift, you set up the main thrust bearing OH SO TIGHT AND CLOSE...close as is humanly possible. If the crank won't do it, GET IT WELDED UP till it WILL DO IT. That's your future oil pressure you are working with. Use a good aftermarket upgrade oil pump, a good RV cam, and a roller timing chain. WHEN YOU LIGHT IT UP, snap it to 1500-1800 RPM for half a minute AT LEAST. Otherwise you can kiss the cam goodby. Use the tall, two-qt filter if ground clearance allows, and.....get this.....NEVER LET IT IDLE....never...shut it off and restart when you need it, but never let a SB Chevy idle. The lifters will scuff the hell out of the cam, and there goes the old ball game. The SB lifter bores are too much "over" the cam lobe and they won't rotate at idle most of the time. Oh yeah, and drill a small hole in the thermostat./wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif AND...one more thing...DON'T RIDE THE CLUTCH. If the light is a long one, pop it in neutral and let off the clutch. Chevys do NOT like crank flange thrust....not one bit/wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif

CJDave
I never believe any statistics unless my moonguys /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif/wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif made 'em up themselves.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i would have to agree with dave. i would also have it balanced and run arp bolts in the bottom end. do not run a high volume pump unless you can run a 7 quart pan. the 5 quart pan will run dry in some situations. i like melling pumps, as they offer parts so you can blueprint them. use a new balancer as they are cheap. a cam button helps, but is not required. if you can, the best thing to start with is a roller cam engine. this will help with most of the problems you would run into. my fave is the no longer available highway patrol motor. it had a stout bottom end, roller cam, and decent heads.

dan

/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.giflet it snow/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif
 

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I'm not going to disagree with CJDave. I will say that CJDave is right on the money about the crankshaft clearances for a small block Chevy. I've built dozens of small block chevys. If your budget is limited, the 2 bolt main small block chevys built after 1968 with the large journal sizes will last a long time with correct crankshaft clearances. Steel cranks are nice, but then again if you budget is limited the cast cranks with correct clearances will last a long time.

I would like to suggest that if your budget is limited, use the less expensive chevy 2 bolt main block and cast crank. I really like the new roller camshaft and roller lifters in a small block chevy. On a budget note, the money spent for a roller cam and roller lifters will add more trouble free miles for the money, rather than spending the extra money on a four bolt main block with steel crank.
dave




 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok
The way i understand it the 4 bolts mains and steel cranks where in ALL the pickup trucks up to the
bigger trucks??? I have been told that marine engines have even stronger stuff in them and a higher
nickel in the casting????
How do you tell the heads with the exhaust valve rotators, this is new to me?????
The roller cam would that take care of the SB cam probs.{dave}
How tight do you run the end play on the crank??OR is it just as tight5 as you can thing????
CJDave if I could get 275000 out of a SB I would be blowed away/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif Have a ford 302 with
175000 with a change of the water pump,mapp sensor,and a fuel pressure reg. Even this has made
me happy/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif
 

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/wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif I have to qualify that 275K.....when this truck was new, it was so smogged over that it literally would not pull itself at 35 in direct, and the MPG stunk. We pulled it out and changed pistons (bored it for good measure) and the cam,. PRESTO! We had an engine. We did that at 65,000 because we just couldn't stand it any more, not because the engine was sad mechanically. That was a hvy duty engine, and had all the good stuff. The later engines we built, we tried to duplicate the formula, searching for truck engines and steel cranks. We set the crank endo clearances as close as humanly possible. If it were not for having the 3/4 ton engine down, I would never have know that they even CAME with big stems and valve rotators. My engine guy was truly the Sultan of Smallblock. Between his skill and my persistence, we got a combination that would go almost as far as a MOPAR!!/wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif I cannot imagine a more appropriate upgrade than to go with a roller cam in a SB Chevy! The very thing that makes them super-vulnerable to cam failure with solid tappetts (too much cam lobe exposed in the lifter bore)would make the rollers work even better than usual!

CJDave
I never believe any statistics unless my moonguys /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif/wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif made 'em up themselves.
 

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I like to let you know about MorTec, INC. http://www.mortec.com There is lots of information about Small Block Chevy's at he mortec web site. I would like to pass on some information about Small Block Chevy's. Some of the information I have, will not be agreed by all. I've been building Small Block Chevy engines for over two decades. Usually the four bolt main block will have it's top center bellhousing bolt hole drilled and tapped with threads. It's the bellhousing bolt hole just behind and below the distributor. The most common vehicle to use the four bolt main block was the pickup. Not all four bolt main blocks had steel cranks, the fact is, very few steel cranks were used by Chevy. Steel cranks are rare in a small block chevy four bolt main engine. It would be easier to find the winning lottery numbers than find a steel crank in a small block chevy engine!

When using a high volume oil pump, make sure to use an oil pump intermediate shaft that has the steel sleeve. The factory uses a nylon type sleeve on the oil pump intermediate shaft.

I like using ture roller timing chain and gear set. The ture roller will keep it's timing accurate for over 200,000 miles if the engine oil is serviced at regular intervals.

My personal opinion about engine oil is change often. I feel engine oil protects engine parts in one of two ways. First is flow. When the engine is new, and the clearances are tight, a light weight oil, 5W-30 for winter 10W-30 for summer, will protect the engine by flowing fast through the tight clearances. Second is cushion. When an engine has been abused with neglected oil changes, the engine parts suffer lots of wear. A heavy weight oil, 10W-40 for winter 20W50 for summer, will protect the engine by cushining the loose clearances.

Valve rotors are a double edge sword! Only the exhaust valve will use a rotor. Engines that are used in stop and go driving, lots of short trips and seldom rev over 4000 RPM will last longer with valve rotors. Valve rotors add weight to the valve train. In a performance application the valve rotors are dead weight and are not needed.

Rocker arms can effect the performance and life of a small block chevy. I like using full roller rocker arms. The ratio is very very accurate! The full roller rocker arm will prevent almost all valve guide wear. The roller tip rocker arm is a good choice for a budget built performance engine. I like using positive valve stem seal with teflon inserts, even on the exhaust valves!

Nothing makes an engine last longer, reguardless of who the engine maker is (Ford, Chevy, AMC, ect.) than close attention to all the engine clearances! Take nothing for granted, check them all yourself! In GOD I trust, all others get checked with a micrometer!
dave
 

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I agree with almost everything Dave and CJDave said, especially about, "In God we trust, everything else gets checked with a micrometer'! That is an absolute fact in engine building. Take no person or company word for anything, check all measurements at least twice, and that includes fastener torques. A complete mock up assembly is an absolute requirement before final cleaning and final assembly also. Don't wait until you put it together to find out something is wrong.

As I understand it, forged steel crank shafts are a little more scarce on the west coast than they are here. Still, all in all, almost every pick up truck to heavy truck chevy made in this country, with a 350 in it, had a forged steel crank, (so did most station wagons).
Forged steel crankshafts are not needed unless you plan to make more than 375 to 400 honest horse power.

The most important thing to note here is, unless you are making 400 honest horse power on a daily basis, you DO NOT need a 4 bolt main cap block.
Factory four bolt main caps start to fail about 550 horse power. (the material in the arch just starts to give way under the stress)
Head gasket, piston, connecting rod and main cap failures are 99.99% DETONATION INDUCED, not defective part failures. Detonation simply hammers the weakest link apart, and is hard as hell on every thing else.

If I remember right, most of the four bolt main blocks have a 010 cast into the bell housing flange on the drivers side top. The 020 were the two blot main, the 030 were the so called 'pressure castings' (don't worry about the 030 castings, none of them should have survived to this day), and the 040 castings were the high nickel 'industrial' engines. You will also find this number cast into the front of the block in the timing chain housing, and sometimes in the bell housing. Not to say that all 010 castings are 4 bolt mains, because if chevy was out of the 020 castings, they would use the 010 castings and only machine it for the two bolt main caps. Some were cast with both 010 & 020 in some places, and I never figured that out or could find anyone that could tell me...
Four bolt main cap 350 blocks grow on trees around the midwest. So many heavy half ton pickups (towing package), 4X4 anything, and 3/4 ton pickups, not to mention all of the station wagons and large farm trucks that had the heavy duty engines in them.
There are still a few of the 040 casting in the salvage yards around here. Nothing like a casting with 5 times the nickel content of the normal production cylinder case. It was used in combines of all things, and we have farm fields full of used and abandoned farm equipment!
(Anyone remember the forged steel crank, high nickel four bolt main 327 engines released as 'Industrial' engines in the 60's and early 70's? They can still be found on stuff like irrigation pumps, large generators, and in combines.)

Everyone overlooks the chevy SB 400 engine. Never released with a forged steel crank, all of the 400's had nodular iron cranks. The cylinder cases released in '70 & '71 had 4 bolt mains.
These 400 CID engine blocks were easy to identify, because they had a third freeze plug boss cast in the middle of the side of the block. The 4 bolt main versions (70 & 71) actually had the extra freeze plug, while the two bolt main versions (72 & Up) only had the boss, and no actual freeze plug.
It should be noted, that with the 400 you get 50 extra cubic inches, but the engine was externally balanced SBC and must have a 400 ballancer and flywheel or flex plate, use the only oddball connecting rod in the SBC family, only offers a cast crank, and the biggest draw back, had 'siamesed' cylinder walls. (Meaning the cylinders were so big, and so close to each other, that the cylinder walls actually connected to each other.
This made for a thermodynamic nightmare as the block expanded and contracted, and also trapped 'steam' at the top of the cylinders. Chevy solved this problem by drilling 'steam holes' in the block and head to bleed the trapped air off, but re builders rarely reuse the horrible 400 heads, and just as rarely drill the steam holes in the new heads, causing hot spots and heat distortions in the top of the cylinder.



All chevy's since 1958 have had forged steel rods, and I agree that the stock rod bolts are sadly lacking. I recommend SPS or ARP.
We hear so much about the 'Pink Stripe' connecting rod. The 'Pink Stripe' rod is nothing more than a pick up truck rod that has been shot peened twice. We successfully use stock production rods every day for up to 700 horse power engines.
(All we do is X-ray, magnaflux, resize the big end, bore the small end for floating rods, sometimes bush the small end, polish rod beams, stress relieve, double shot peen, buy & change the rod bolts, and balance..... By the time we find 8 good rods, throw tons of labor into them, and have them ready to use, the customer would have been better off buying aftermarket rods that were stronger, and ready to use out of the box...)

The hot ticket in chevy heads right now is the introduction of the Vortec V-8 heads! These are the best iron heads chevy has ever produced! You will need a new intake though, because these heads are nothing like the regular small block heads on the intake side.
They feature straighter intake passages, air flow guides in the intake pocket, no EGR passages, spark plug relocation and a host of other improvement that chevy has been dragging their feet on for 30 years. I only hope that an aluminum set isn't far off!!!

The valve rotators on chevy heads that CJDave spoke of are not really necessary anymore with the advent of hardened valves and valve seats. In the days of cast iron valve seats, and soft steel valves, rotators were an absolute must! If you choose to install rotators, don't forget to take the height of the rotate into account while measuring your spring install height. We get 3 or 4 cases a year in the shop here with a 'Mistery' problem, and missing rotators, or rotators installed with full size springs will be the problem.

I saw cam break in mentioned in one of the preceding posts, and that IS a problem in all engines, now more than ever.
Cam profiles are getting stiffer every day, and the ramp angles, ramp velocities, and spring pressures are really on the verge of insanity.
(Why 'Detroit' hasn't gone to electronically controlled valves before now is beyond me.
Just think about that for a minute, change your cam profile with a credit card swiped through a reader under the hood... How cool!
How about a switch on the dash that lets you go from a 400 HP cam to milage cam for highway driving...?)
Every cam manufacturer is different, but most want you to start the engine and keep it at 2,000 to 2,500 for 20 to 30 minutes now to break the cam in.
How many small time builders do you know that are ready to fire the engine and go straight to 2,500 RPM for 30 minutes? How many do you know that can static time the engine, static tune the carb, and have all of the connections and hoses correct at first firing?
We are lucky, we can break them in on the dyno, but most shops don't even have a test fixture to hold the engine for break in.
I have been thinking about a test fixture just for breaking in the cam. Some sort of engine cradle, an electric motor drive for oil pressure, and mock spring pressure on the lifters, and an electric motor on the cam at the required 2,000 or 2,500 RPM...
No timing drive, just drive the loaded cam until the required break in is done.

What do you guys think?

Later folks, Aaron.

So many cats, so few recipes...
 

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/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif GREAT POST! Teamrush... I like that idea about mocking the block up with the cam in and breaking in the lifters./wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif You are right on about getting the engine right and running on the first try. I see so much fiddling around/wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif that you would think it was an experimental process./wwwthreads_images/icons/frown.gif Yeah, I really like that idea about pre-running the cam./wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif Heck, in the old days we thought we were superbly tricky with an external oil pump drive to pre-oil those big double-rocker Chryslers. I've never built an engine that didn't come to life at a perfect idle before I gave it the throttle to cam-break-in-RPM. It just isn't rocket science.....lessee, intake-compression...what was that next one?/wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif

CJDave
I never believe any statistics unless my moonguys /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif/wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif made 'em up themselves.
 

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I just love what you hear at the race track some nights. One of these days I'm going to write a book of just the cool, not so cool, bad, goofy, ridiculous, and just plain infuriating things that have gone on at one track or another down through the years.
There seem to be four pretty distinct categories of people at the race track.
1. The Pro. the pro is the guys that have the nice cars, but are going really quick. Every body is sober, and most of them look like school teachers, bankers or store clerks ('cause that's what they are!) These guys are consistent, not overly friendly, but really get the job done.
2. The Screamer. The Screamer is the kind of guy that has a REALLY quick car, that seems to be patched together. Looks like it was once a nice race car, but has fallen on hard times. He's usually friendly, and will have a beer or two, but is usually looking for some way to make a buck or trade for parts.
The acid test is to ask if he's ever spent the night in the car because he didn't have money for a hotel room after getting registered for the race.
3. The Sportsman. The Sportsman has a car made of mostly factory parts. He's racing brackets for little or no money, and usually has the family in tow. If the race car has a baby seat in it between rounds, he's just there for the sheer joy of racing. This is a nice guy, a family man, and almost always has a good word for you.

4. The Hammer Head. This particular breed of 'racer' can be identified by the excessively loud exhaust, one wheel burnouts in the parking lot, large amounts of foul language at VERY high volume, and music that makes me want to give them a lobotomy with a ball peen hammer. If these aren't enough clues, listen to one of the conversations going on around one of these clusters of cars......
Here are some examples:
It's the Otter cycle engine, (or is that Otto cycle engine?)
Isn't that Infernal combustion that makes it work?
They all have carburetors that never 'Suck' in enough air...
(Guess they have never heard of the draw through principle)

And my personal favorite, the '3/4 Race Cam'!
I just can't control myself when some stooge starts spouting about 'him and his buddy' that installed a ' 3/4 Race Cam!', and now it won't idle below 1,500 RPM!
(top fuel funny cars sit on the line and idle that 600 to 800...)
I just have to ask them if that's 3/4 of an inch lift, 3/4 of a turn duration, or did they just break the last 4 lobes off of the bump stick?...
As the baggy pant, shorts past his knees goof stands there with their hat backwards, and tobacco juice running down the slack jaw, and a vacant look in the eyes,
(much like the strained look a severely constipated man has on and un-successful trip to the bathroom) as they mull over what I just said, with those last two lonely brain cells trying to survive the flood of budwiser tall boys, ...... and finally the answer we have all been waiting for ......
'Hey! F**k you!'
What a snappy response! I'm so impressed! I want my kids to turn out just like him!
I wonder if they know the meaning of Incest...?...

Nothing like a trip to the local drag strip to take the edge off!

Don't get me started on the car show circuit!

And a cheerful good night to one and all! Later, Aaron.

So many cats, so few recipes...
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Now teamrush I no way want to hold up for the fool you speak of but I remember when J.C. wit
use to list there cams as 3/4 race./wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif I know what your saying. I think they had 3/4 race and
full race if I remember right. That would of been in the 60's.
I remember in the 74 to 78 or 80 that chevy in there adds said that all trucks have a forge crank.
The adds did not say any thing about 4 bolt mains but just guessed they where and was told that
they where. This is the best AS I can remember for what it is worth.
Do you have any idea who's combine's had the SB chevys in them ????
This is some great stuff. Thank You guys.
The front seal in the timing chain cover would always eat a groove in the balancer is there a way around
this or do the newer engines have this fixed?? Some other brands of engines look like this area on the
balancer was hard chromed????
 

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I'm not even going to comment on what J.C. Whitney used to print, or prints now, for that matter.
There is no truth in advertising, or half of the hot rod parts guys would be paying huge fines, and the other half would be in jail. You can say pretty much anything you want, because there just are not many guys out there to dispute them.
Most guys won't get the education in what ever the subject is, so you can baffle them with BS.
With ignitions they talk about huge spark voltages, when the truth of the matter is, any modern stock coil will do the job. They should be talking about capacitive discharge modules, and spark duration. (Something you almost never see)
They are not going to tell you that $450 and up for a stock style, inductive discharge distributor is at least 2 1/2 times what it would cost if you used stock parts to do the same job the same way.
With engine builds it should be Torque that one is looking for, not focused on horse power.
They all try to sell you intakes that make power in RPM ranges you never operate in.
---Besides, the guys I was talking about weren't even a thought in the 60's, so I don't think they picked it up from J.C. Whitney in the 60's.
It's the local 'Crazy Cooter' in the dump garage filling their heads with crap about cars that never existed.



There is a push on sleeve that fixes that grit groove in the balancer. I'm thinking they are in the TRW catalog. Any real parts store (like NAPA) or any engine machine shop should have them on the shelf. They are about $8.
If the rubber in your balancer is cracked, or is 'mushroomed' up out of the joint, or the balancer shows signs of hammer marks on the front or back of it, THROW IT AWAY.
Also get rid of it if the outside ring looks like it has moved forward or backward of the hub.
A new balancer is relatively cheep compared to the damage and frustration a defective one will do. Use a longer bolt to push one on the crank, NEVER HAMMER ON ONE, no matter what grandpa, the guy at the muffler shop, or the 'speed shop' weenier told you. Bolts are cheap, buy one. I personally prefer screwing in a stud, and using a nut and heavy washer to push the balancer on. Do not use an impact wrench to remove or install a balancer. It's hard on tools, and it's hard on the balancer.

THIS IS IMPORTANT.
Remember to mock your timing cover up, along with your balancer, while you have the heads off and can positively identify Top Dead Center (TDC), and make sure the timing tab on the cover, and your timing mark on the balancer actually indicate TDC.
If they don't,-- break the tab off of the cover, and get a bendable bolt on replacement, and bend it until it shows TDC. Mr. Gasket sells scads of them every day, it's a common problem.
All Small Block Chevy (SBC) anything will bolt up to damn near anything else, and in this case, it will work against you. Chevy has at least three different front covers that mate with three different balancers, and if you mix and match, the timing mark is going to be wrong. If you order a balancer, make sure you have the correct front cover, or order the 'adjustable' bolt on timing tab.
This is a HUGE pain in the ass on used small block anything. Most of the small blocks you find used would rev fast enough to spin the center of the balancer independent of the outside ring, and then your timing is off. Add a little oil to degrade the rubber, and maybe lubricate the slip, and it gets very likely the balancer is junk now, or will be very soon. Add to that the squirrel that drops it in parts washer solvent, gasoline or carb cleaner to wash it, and the odds of failure go up dramatically.
Many a decent engine rebuild has gone down the tubes because of this very thing.
Your timing is no where you think it is, and not right away, but pretty soon you think the engine is a mutt, and decide to get rid of it, or detonation ruins the engine, depending on what direction the ring slips.
We had a small block in an 1/8 mile car, in our younger years, that when you wound it up and dumped the clutch, it would hook so violently that the outside ring would slip! Took forever to find that problem... (Two broken cranks, a multitude of bent valves, broken rocker arms and push rods...)
We scribe a line from the inside to the outside now, so we know when it slips.
(The same trick works on axles to see if they are twisting)

As far as the combine question goes, I know we have found them in Massey-Harris, (Before Massey-Furguson), Minnieapolis-Moline and White. Those 327 engines fed our racing needs for a good while when we were young and broke. Forged cranks for the small journal 327 were a god send to us. The plant that forged those crank shafts is in Louisville KY., and still in business, if I remember correctly.
I still see the high nickel blocks once in a while in the coal mines running pumps, lights or welders. They are few and far between now.

Hope this answers some of your questions...
Later guys, Aaron.

So many cats, so few recipes...
 

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/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif When I wuz draggin' tenth street in Modesto with the rest of the "actual" American Grafitti kids, I always had a stock cam in the back seat of my hot Pontiac. The cam was out of a Ford flathaed and was cleaned up nice and proper. When some wannabe racer kid got in my car, he would spot the cam, and first of all, they would have NO IDEA what it was, and then when I asked them if they thought the "CAM" was "hot" enough, they would examine it and invaribly say: "Wow, this is a "Full Race" cam if I ever saw one. You can't fool an expert like me!" "You're right." I would say, "There's no sense in tryin' to fool an expert like you!" Heh heh.../wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif Those were the daze.....all we did was drag tenth street in Modesto. George Lucas was right there with us, and I know who EVERY ONE of the characters in the movie were in real life./wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif CJ(Grafitti) Dave

CJDave
I never believe any statistics unless my moonguys /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif/wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif made 'em up themselves.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Note that AMC 390s and 401s have forged cranks, forged rods, high nickel blocks, truroller chain and valve rotators on HD truck/police versions, better flowing heads, larger head bolts, larger main bolts and thicker saddles and weigh about the same as the bellybutton engine!

 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Good point Martin
The deal for me is it would be hard for me to fine a 390 or 401 around here. High steel prices a time back
had alot of good stuff crushed./wwwthreads_images/icons/mad.gif A 304AMC or a SBC could made a better Jeep motor TO ME.
I like the 258 -6 it will run 70 MPH or grunt thru the hills. To me the gas useage is not bad .I ran BB454
chevys for 10 years and if you when hunting you better have both 20 GAL tanks full.
Bet I could fine SBC out of a combine easyer than any thing and prob cheap.
Just think a high nickel 327 setup like the above post . You could use a Chevy bell houseing and a chevy
NV4500 and only buy a adaptor for the 300 tranfercase. It could be the cheapest way out.
Put a 390 to a 500 cfm carb on it . Could make a long legged runner that could still crawl and
get good gas useage with a long life from the engine. Hopefuly 200,000 miles or more??

What about the heads would the old high nickel blocks have harden seats on the valve seats
so to burn the unleaded gas of today???????
 

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Check with http://www.mortec.com for casting information for SBC heads, cranks, and blocks. It's the best site I've ever seen for SBC information! To answer the question about SBC heads and harden seats. The general consensus is that heads with the peanut spark pulg have at least flame harden seat. The peanut spark plug started production in about 1971, about the same time low leaded and non-leaded fuel hit the gas pumps. It's also common consensus that most head casting 882, 993 (some 993's are cast in Mexico) or 997 are the improved harden seats. Like many things is the SBC production, the assembly line must move! So the factory would surprise us!
I'm in 100% agreement with TeamRush about the current production Vortec heads, they are the BEST performance flow for the dollar! Check with http://www.paceparts.com for more information about the Vortec heads. I've seen Vortec heads for about $400 for a complete pair, fully assembled.
dave
 

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/wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif I spent a crapload of dough on a 454 in my Suburban trying to make an engine out of that dog. I should have gone with a 455 Olds and TH400 and used my tailshaft adapter. WHAT A BOAT ANCHOR that BB was! My good-running 350 was nearly as much engine and burned a fraction of the fuel./wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif

CJDave
I never believe any statistics unless my moonguys /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif/wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif made 'em up themselves.
 

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I just get misty every time I think about the new Vortec heads, Dave.
All we did with the V-8 Vortec heads was the clean up a little casting flash, under cut the valves one more time, and bolt them on. We gave $398.96 for the set, ready to go out of the box. I have never seen a casting from the factory so clean of over cast and so well machined before.
There is a fair amount of meat in the casting for what ever your little machining heart might want to do, and the decks are thicker (and stiffer!) than the old 'warping sue' castings we have had to put up with for the past 20 years or so.
They just kick butt on the iron bow tie castings, and they don't cost near as much, or take a tenth of the prep work. The only draw back is they aren't aluminum.... (Dear Santa...)
We just can't wait to throw a 6-71 at them at about 15 lbs of boost, and see what happens... Chevy always had good exhaust ports, and now they have fixed about half of the intake runner problems, for what I think is the best iron casting I have ever seen, production or aftermarket.
(I can tell you that dyno figures jumped in a big way when we used anti-reversion headers for some reason. I haven't figured that one out, I'll let you know when I do.)

I know I'm gushing, but this is BIG in the world of SBC.... This head just made the H.O. 5.0 Ford engine an available novelty, like the flathead engine.
Now, how long to a decent big block Vortec style head...?... Or aluminum SBC heads?

Later dudes, bed time for me, my pain medication is kicking in....
Aaron.

So many cats, so few recipes...
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
You hit the nail on the head on the 454 thing CJDave . In 74 I was 21 and whated to buy my first new
pickup. Test drove a chevy 350 and when you hit the gas the only thing that moved was the gas gage.
Well the 454 had a little snap to it so that what I bought. Didnot what to buy a new truck and tear it
down and try to make a motor out of it. Had a salesman ask me why I wanted that big motor with
all that horse power. I said what HP a 327 SB could run away and hide from that 454 witch got me
a blank look. I think at the time I could beat the SB in HP ,MPG, But it was nothing to write home
about. In 78 we receved a new one ton chev. van .You had to go to a on ton to get a frame under
a chevy van well it seemed like a fair motor just drove it a week before I transfered out.That motor got us
a little over 15 MPG unheard of for a chev.350 so loaded. First day I drove the van pulled out of the
office it was raining and I got boxed in by a UPS truck and backed into buy a car. /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif
 
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