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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 360 Block\'s back from the machine shop

I just picked up the block and the Federal Mogul Platinum Engine Kit. I hope to start my first engine building project soon. It's going to go slow, on purpose. I want to take my time and do it right. Right now, I'm going to be swapping out the timing set from the Federal Mogul kit for a double roller timing kit. Then I'm going to go back and reread the book on how to rebuild an engine.
 

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Re: My 360 Block\'s back from the machine shop

Since your blocks naked why don't you add the internal oil bypass tube in the lifter galley to supply extra oil to the rear crank journel. Do a search for info on this.

Pigpen
76 CJ5
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Re: My 360 Block\'s back from the machine shop

Yes, I have to do those two oiling upgrades. Another oiling upgrade I'm considering is painting the lifter valley. I understand that it can help prevent sludge buildup in the ifter valley. I am concerned about doing it wrong and having paint flakes floating throughout the guts of the engine. On the other hand, the safer way to help the sludge is to keep changing the oil.
 

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Re: My 360 Block\'s back from the machine shop

is that paint for that called "glyptol"?

someone was talking abotu the the other day, and I THINK thats the name ive seen , at least one brand of internal engine paint

what does the double roller cost?

and what cam are you to use?

OzarkJeep

too small to be seen, and too big to control, and treated like a walking bomb...
 
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Re: My 360 Block\'s back from the machine shop

I assume you had the cyls. bored? If so, what kind of rings are you using? If you are using the chromoly rings, make sure your machinist used the proper crosshatch pattern, otherwise the rings will never seat because they are VERY hard. I've seen this happen too often to not mention it.

Brad
ORC Land Use Editor

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http://home.off-road.com/~rockgarden
 

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Re: My 360 Block\'s back from the machine shop

Try it this way...

the address[/url[ , but turn the la...HTNAME=eng_drive_new.htm&UID=2001032608590768

Check to make sure your main caps are in the correct number, and facing the correct direction.
There will be arrows pointing forward, and numbers starting with #1 in the front.
If not, it may have been align honed incorrectly.

Check the tops of the cylinders for a slight taper or round over. If you don't have one, you are almost surely going to have hot spots and piston ring hang ups when you install.

IF you insert your rings in the cylinder, and use a feeler gauge to check the end gap, move the ring up and down the cylinder a few times.
You are looking for any light coming in around the outside of the ring, or the gap getting larger or smaller (use a feeler gauge).
If you find any of this, the cylinders were bored and/or honed incorrectly.
The only exception is the top 1.25" if a torque plate was used for final hone.
You may see a little light around the ring at the very top.
(Tech tip, Put the ring in the top of the cylinder, then turn a piston upside down and push the ring down. Pull the piston out and check the ring end gap with a set of feeler gauges or wires. The piston will keep the ring square in the bore, the ring grooves and pin holes work as depth gauges, and it saves you an $80 tool cost.)

Check your head bolt holes for chamfer of the top threads. If they aren't, you will pull the top thread up, and not get a correct head gasket torque.
Main cap bolt holes have to be done this way also. No exceptions.

Get a small flashlight and look in every nook and cranny of the block. If you find ANY crap at all, take it back for cleaning. This is VERY important, and it includes the water jackets.

Check all of your gallery plugs (threaded), and all of your core plugs (press in) for removal and cleaning.
Use a squeeze tube type teflon bearing plumbers thread sealing paste on the threads of your plugs.
BE CAREFUL! Those are tapered plugs going into tapered holes! You can crack the cast iron pretty easy here.
Use brass plugs when and where you can (allen socket head type preferable) and don't crank down on them like a main cap bolt... It only takes about 12 Ft. Lb. to keep a plug in, and you can generate that with a short handle allen wrench.

For the press in core plugs, use SEALER in the hole, and on the outside lip of the plugs.
Use brass plugs when ever possible, they are worth the extra cost.
Don't put the plug in the back of the cam shaft bore until the cam is in place.
ALWAYS USE SHORT BRASS FOR THIS PLUG. Go easy on the sealer.

IF you decide to grind, file, drill, sweep, weld or anything else in the garage your block is stored in, make sure you BAG YOUR BLOCK!
Even the spark plug holes are a place for crap to enter so try to take the 'Sterilized Torque Wrench' approach to building your engine...

Remember, you can always wash your engine with HOT water and soap (In fact, I recommend the end user washing it at least three times before any assembly starts).
You will be surprised what will come of the block with a good scrubbing with Dawn dish soap and HOT water.
Hot water will evaporate before it can cause rust, but use some kind of LUBRICATING oil (NOT PENETRATING OIL) on the bare cast iron and steel parts before you store it, even for over night.
As for lubricating oil, I use assembly lube or 10W40 Engine oil, depending if I need it to cling, or just cover some surface area and run off...
Do not attempt to re-use any oil that has run off the block. The pennies you save isn't worth the risk of contamination.

So many cats, so few recipes...
 
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Re: My 360 Block\'s back from the machine shop

Thanks TR - I did not realize that bracket had to be turned.

Ozark - If you scroll down the page almost to the bottom you'll find it there. It's good stuff.

I am a bomb technician, if you see me running, try to keep up
'85 Cj7,360,TH400,D300,Pro-jection,D44's,M/T's 35's,8274
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Re: My 360 Block\'s back from the machine shop

OzarkJeep,
That's what I understand the paint's name. I haven't priced the double roller. The parts house will swap it out for me, I pay the difference. Seems like a good deal. I had wanted to go with a Comp Cam. I decided to stick with the kit's cam. I decided that if I stick with the kit's cam, the money can go to replacing a few other parts, like the pushrods.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Re: My 360 Block\'s back from the machine shop

Brad,
The machinest worked with me when I ordered the kit. He wanted to make sure he knew what rings were going in. When I picke dup the engine, he handed over the plastigage, a set of rob bolt covers and a print out for the torque specs on the engine. The printout also had a listing of what the grindings on the rods, mains and cylinders are. The bill from the machine shop had the sizes on it also. It was a nice touch to have the numbers on the printout. I'll xerox it and tote it into the garage for the assembley.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Re: My 360 Block\'s back from the machine shop

TeamRush,
Thanks for that information. You supplied a lot of information that I hadn't heard before.
 

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Re: My 360 Block\'s back from the machine shop

Yup, that's experience talking...

Here is one thing you MUST DO...
AMC engines and camshaft oil galleries that come in at a strange angle...
You must get your head up in the block from the bottom, and make sure the cam bearings are installed correctly!
If the guy got complacent, and drove them in head on, you will not get oil to the cam bearings, or the oil flow will be severely reduced.

Use a piece of weed eater line and stick it up in the cam bearing oil galleries, and see if the gallery aligns with the oil hole in the bearing.
It's a REALLY strange angle, so just looking to see if it's correct sometimes doesn't tell the tale. The weed eater line won't scratch your cam bearings while you are poking around, and it will be stiff enough to navigate the passages showing you the angle...

I also chamfer the cam bearings to allow a straight shot for the oil, but that shouldn't be tried by beginners.

So many cats, so few recipes...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Re: My 360 Block\'s back from the machine shop

TeamRush,
Thanks for that weedeater trick. I've got a brand new spool of weedeater line sitting in my shed. It's left over from fall and never been opened. It will be real clean when I check the alignment of the cam bearing oil holes.
 
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