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The Summit kit and the corvette alt. are both for Delco alternators, and unless I'm mistaken again, he has the Nippon-Denso alternator.

CJ Dave is right about the Leece-Neville alternator. Up to 160 amps continuous duty cycle, and really big bearings. User programmable voltage output. Heavy trucking and heavy equipment get them to go a million miles with larger loads than we'll ever put on them every day, all day long. Isolated ground means you can run it positive or negative ground...

dorfs is correct, the Leece-Neville will trigger trouble codes till the cows come home... And you will have to run a healthy capacitor to protect any 'soft' electrical equipment, like computers or stereos....
dorfs may also be correct that the hotter N-D alternator will do the job.
(If 100 amps doesn't do it, I can't see a 130 amp surge alternator doing it...)

What in the wide world of sports are you running that two batteries and a 100 amp alternator won't handle?!?!

If Chris Columbus "Discovered" America (with 25 million already here), Can I Go "Discover" Florida?
 

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I bought Reman Leese-Neville form Leece-Neville for under $100 in '95.
That was a W-D price. I think full retail is about $300, and most of the volume parts stores will part with them for around $150.
Check with any heavy truck parts store.
The 105 amp is the most common, and that is continuous duty cycle. The 105 will pull up to 175 amps momentary load...

They are ground neutral, meaning they have isolated grounds. You can run them on negative or positive ground vehicles.

The three most common are 105, 130, and 160 in the small size case like we were talking about.
They make them all the way up to 7,200 or 7,500 amps, and up to 440-3 phase voltage, but those are for cruse ships and locomotives and some of that huge ass mining equipment. Those are 4 feet in diameter though, a little much even for those stereo squirrels...

AND, this still doesn't help the guy in the orignal post if he wants all of the stock stuff to work correctly.

Later folks... Aaron.

If Chris Columbus "Discovered" America (with 25 million already here), Can I Go "Discover" Florida?
 

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A plain old Delco alternator will come in amperages from 42 to 130 in a standard size case. 10-SI, 12-SI, 15-SI and 116 type, all 12 volt and internally regulated, for example. Common as anything I have ever seen. Several flavors will interchange. Everybody makes 'upgrades' for them, and none of the work correctly afterwards.
Sold for as little as $19 at discount auto parts stores.

There are industrial Delco alternators that come on heavy equipment that will work. 20-SI, 100 amp continuous duty, 12 and 24 volt, internally regulated, one wire hookup, for example. Common as nails on heavy earth moving equipment. A really good choice for a Jeep if you find one in 12 volts.

There are the new, Small case Delco alternators that are referred to as the CS series. CS-130, 12 volt, internally regulated, for example. Good choice if you can find a good wiring diagram. Common as nails, and easy to rebuild. Watch for the expansion wedge under the pulley nut holding the pulley on. Most people mistake it for a lock washer, and ruin the shaft trying to get the pulley off.

There are Nippon Denso alternators that Mopar uses on the Jeeps since 91. Very small and virtually disposable. All 12 volt, and externally regulated. Not my favorites, and really temperamental. Not really rebuildable.

There are the Large 'basket' type Mopar alternators, All 12 volt and externally regulated. These take some extra wiring, and I believe there are better choices for jeeps.

There are the Ford alternators, all 12 volt, all externally regulated. Take some extra wiring, but available and dependable.

There are the Prestolite alternators, all 12 volt and externally regulated. Not a good choice

There are Motorola alternators, all 12 volts, all externally regulated. Not a good choice.

There are Leese-Neville alternators. 12, 24, 36 and 38 volts in the small cases.
105, 130 and 160 in the small cases. Isolated ground, can be used with either positive or negative ground. User adjustable voltage output of about a five volt spread.
These are rated as continuous duty, where several others are momentary maximum output.
Very easy to mount, and very easy to rebuild.
Found on heavy equipment and heavy trucks everywhere. A really good choice for a real Jeep.

This is just a rundown of the most common types that have appeared on a Jeep from the factory, or that would be a good choice for a heavy duty replacment...

Hope this helps... Aaron.

If Chris Columbus "Discovered" America (with 25 million already here), Can I Go "Discover" Florida?
 
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