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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it as easy as it sounds? Put a #2 welding tip on the oxy/act torch and heat it until its bright red? Or do i need to do something different. Thanks- Tim
 
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The gases that come off Galvanizing when heated (such as welding) are very costic
. If this is something that you have to do, wear proper breathing gear!
 

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As far as I know , Galvanizing is only a dip , just take a grinder to it . And DONT under any circumstances breath those fumes , same goes for welding that stuff . Welding that almost cost a kid his life at the shop a few doors down from my old work place .

jeff
 

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Burning off galvanizing produces poisonous gases. They can put you into respitory distress, a heart attack can quickly follow. It's not a pretty sight. If that don't get ya, then perhaps carbon monoxide will.

In short, it's pretty dangerous stuff to play with if you're not wearing a respirator and/or have good air circulation.

That's one of the problems pro and amature welders always face when welding on galvanized sheet metal. Patch repiar of autobodies and frames can give off a lot of fumes. But then, it's your choice.

Zinc can be removed by soaking the piece in a mild acid bath. Vinegar works pretty well, but the piece has to be soaked for several hours. I've even heard Draino works...but I've never tired it. Draino can give off some nasty fumes when heated.

Also one other thought... if there is ANY temper in the metal then heating to red hot will destory it... be prepared to restore needed temper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ok then let me ask a better question: Where can i find non galvanized mesh type fencing? We are going to have a pig roast friday night and due to the size of the pig it seems like the easiest way to cook it will be to wrap it in wire fence mesh and stick two polls through it so that we can flip it. Any better ideas? If i cant grind zinc off of fence mesh, so i would have to burn it.

We also thought about cutting a 55 gal drum in half to make a big grill but then you have the whole problem of cleaning whatever was in the drum out real good and stuffing a really big pig into it.- Tim
 
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How do you Restore the Temper in metal LEVE? I still dont really understnad the process, on of my teachers said to heat the steel up and slowly put it into cold water...
is this right?

Jesse
 

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Hey Tim
What I've done in the past is use safety wire. You can find it in McMaster Carr. It is Stainless Steel, you can get it in different sizes in a spool (it is usually used to go through the head of bolts on critical equiptment or aircraft, sometimes called aircraft saftey wire). Or even better yet, you can go to Home depot or any welding store and pick up a small spool of ss mig wire, that will work too.
 

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Well when I saw the post I was going to mention something along the lines of watch out for the fumes, but it looks like I was beaten to it a few times over. I'm still pretty new to this board, but if I remember anything from my welding teacher its don't over heat galvanized metal. I suppose if your just roasting a pig you don't need the metal to be super strong. Just stronger than a pig. Would just a basic steel wire work for you? And there is always that string used on turkeys.
 

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In reply to:

Zinc can be removed by soaking the piece in a mild acid bath. Vinegar works pretty well, but the piece has to be soaked for several hours.
I'm with LEVE on this one. Use muratic acid.

You don't want zinc involved in food preparation. If you don't have a spit big enough, do it Hawaiian luau style. You'll need to look it up on the web to get the exact particulars, but you basically dig a pit in the ground and line it with charcoal. Once you get all the charcoal burning and the flames die down, you put the pig in the pit and cover him up. Put on your bright shirts and grass skirts. Besides you can all get leid. MAKE DAMN SURE YOU KNOW WHAT YOU'RE DOING COOKING PORK. If you don't cook it properly hot enough and long enough, it can kill you. From the little I know, if you are going to roast a whole pig Friday night, that means you are going to eat on Saturday. So if you want to eat Friday you need to start the pig roast sometime Thursday.

In reply to:

How do you Restore the Temper in metal LEVE? I still dont really understnad the process, on of my teachers said to heat the steel up and slowly put it into cold water... is this right?
I'm not LEVE, but use oil, not water.
 

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Thinking back about what I said, the "line the pit" may be a little misleading. It's got to be a pretty thick lining and I think you also need enough charcoal to cover the pig and I'm not sure but I think you then cover that with dirt to keep the heat in. I'm not really sure, like I said look it up on the web.
 

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Heat treating steels is a huge subject. What you do depends on what alloy you have and how you want it to perform.

In general, carbon steels can be made hard by heating to a dull to medium red, and then cooling quickly, or "quenching". The quicker they are cooled, the harder, and more brittle, they will be.

After that, the steel can be heated to a lower temperature and cooled slowly to relieve the brittleness, but maintain most of the hardness. That is tempering.

The specific temperatures, procedures and quenching medium (usually oil or water, depending on the alloy) for hardening and tempering depend on the alloy and the specific properties desired.

A problem with big pieces, like a vehicle frame, is that you can not readily harden and temper one area - at the edge of the area you heat and quench will be a band that was not hot enough to harden, and is "annealed," or made soft as possible.

I think that Jeep frames, at least older Jeeps, are all in an annealed condition, which is what allows one to weld to them without any special after treatment.
 

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Get a piece of the lightest-weight concrete reinforcing mesh. It's heavier than you need, but, with just a little effort, it can be bent around your pig.

There used to be some non-galvanized mesh fence material, but I haven't seen any for a long time. It can't hurt to try a farm supply store.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
got it, concrete reinforcing mesh, safety wire, or ss mig wire


The pig roast is just a good excuse to have a huge all night party and then a really big feast. The pig will go in friday night for lunch sat.

My dad knows the details of the roast, he has done 10+ over the last twenty years in the air force. He just never had to supply the mesh fencing- Tim
 

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Here in Michigan we rent a hog roaster from a local for $20. (old fuel oil tank cut appropriately with small low rpm motor to turn the spit.) Start the hog early in the morning, and you can have it for dinner. The first/last one I did we started at 6 or 7a.m. and ate it for dinner. It was 120lb hog(dressed), it took two twenty pound bags of charcoal to cook. Nothing to it. We had a thermometer to stick in the hog to make sure it was hot enough. 160 degrees I think.
 
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