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i went garage sale brousing with my wife today, found a 50lb (4 or 5 gallon?) used "non-refillable" refrigerant tank for 50 cents (with a 300 psi guage/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif), now i've been thinking about turning one into a air-tank for awhile, so i got home and hooked it up with some hose and a air chuck and started to fill it with my "Walmart special" 12-volt air-compressor. (the thing is slow but says it can make 250 psi) so i got 150 in the freon tank and decided to stop, thinking Hmmm..... i don't see a blow off....Hmmmmm how much can this thing take.
so what do you all think? any guesses?

3/4tonYJ

http://www.geocities.com/yj3qtr_ton
 

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Hey Gregg,
As good as you are at finding things, have you considered building your own CO2 power tank? I kind of wish I had done that instead of the OBA system. Oh yea, 28 days to go.
John


"Honestly, I didn't lift the Jeep.
I,um..ah..lowered the axles"
 

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Re: Freon air tank

There are conversion kits available for this, but it sounds like you've already done that. There is usually a brazed flap of thinner metal covering a large hole near the valve that will tear if the pressure goes too high, but that's probably in the range of 600 psi. It has to withstand the tank being shipped in a closed 18-wheeler trailer in the middle of summer in the Mojave, and it could get that high if heated to about 300 degrees. I wouldn't worry about blowing it - even an industrial air compressor rarely gets above 200 psi. If you wanna test it, fill it almost fully with water and then just let the "250" psi pump run for a while. Even if it ruptures (which I'm sure it won't), water isn't elastic, so it won't explode like a tankfull of air would - just a small pop.

Steve 83 Bronco 4.9L
Build it; Don't buy it...
 
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As an HVAC tech, there are a few things to remember when useing these tanks for air.It is very dangerous to use old Freon (disposable) cylinders for compressed air. These cylinders are much thinner than "refillable" types (such as the BBQ grill tanks). When filled with "air" the moisture drops out of the air under pressure, and sets on the bottom
and it rusts it away. The cylinder can then "explode" and kill someone. When filled with the original refrigerant, there is no "rusting" or chemical reaction going on inside the cylinder.
I have seen these tanks rust fron the outside and explode in a van, looked like a gernade had gone off in there. Also if you DOT catches you using a disposable Freon tank for compressed air, you may get upto a $250,000 fine. If it is transported off your property.I use a refilable tank that has a drain valve on it and a blow off valve set at 250psi.
Just a word to the wise and my 2cents.




if its clean, I aint having fun!
 
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