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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i just good a yj tub for my cj and i want the yj tub to all set when i put it on the frame, i am planing on using herculiner and i was wondering on how good should it be preped? how do they recomend? the drivers floor board is a little soft so i am going to replace the section, after i replace the section, (it is obviosly going to be bare metal)? does it need to be primed?? what? or just cleaned really GOOD?

 

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not sure about bare metal.. i would atleast prime it. but for paint.. you want to rough it up.. like with a green scratch pad.. get the shine off it.. then put in down.. it needs something to grip too.. could use high grit sand paper.

survival is instinct, but living takes guts
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just put it in my CJ. On the bare metal, I sanded it a little then sprayed with rustoleum. I let it dry they scuffed it with some thick steel wool. Be careful with that xylene, I threw everyhting away that it had touched because it WILL NOT wash out. Also, if you use the roller it comes with, it will be VERY rough and be hard to clean. After I realized how rough it was, I decided to fiddle around with making it smoother. I poored it into a pan and let it dry a little, not too much. Then I put it on with a brush. It is still textured, but smoother and very easy to clean. The best thing about Herculiner is it smells like chocolate cake. I did mine 2 months ago and it still smells good. One more thing, don't get it on yourself. It WON'T come off.

 

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A local tow truck company covered their surface rusty flat back with it. From the info I received, they got the stuff free to "test" for some tow truck supply company when it first hit the market. I don't know how long Herculiner has been out now, but let me tell you that that flat back is still covered solid. They spayed it down with hot water and soap at the car wash, let it dry and painted the stuff on. That's it - and hundreds of cars later it's still there. That stuff sticks to everything - and I mean everything. Our Motor T maint shop then placed it on their flat back as well. They accidently covered some bolts and had to chizel the stuff off. We recently did my next door neighbor's CJ tub, and the only prep we did was to take a wire brush bit on a drill and knock the loose paint and rust free. Where we dripped on good paint and immediately wiped it off - it took the clear coat finish clean off. We got some on the rear glass by accident and didn't find it until the next day, and broke a razor blade trying to get it off. We also didn't use gloves. Stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid-stupid and again I say stupid. We got so desperate, we soaked and scrubbed our hands in gasoline, paint thinner, acetone, and a host of other cancer causing agents including the parts wash bin at the local machine shop in a vain attempt to get it off. Three days later - it didn't look like we washed our hands at all.

Personally we liked the rough texture because we found that where it was smooth, when it becomes wet and muddy, it gets slicker than greased owl poop. As far as the chocolate cake smell? I think Ed may have inhaled too much herc fumes. That stuff smells like fresh pvc cement-foamy engine degreaser-oil based bug killer-high gloss lacquer-header paint when you first crank the new engine on-with a touch of surgical gloves fresh out of the box. We decided topless on 37 degree mornings was more bearable - that or his mom can't cook choclate cake worth a lick! Just kidding Ed!!!!

 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just did mine last weekend... WHAT A PAIN IS THE A$$!!!!!! Ya see, I tend to be a bit anal, so I followed the directions to the letter. I removed the moldy, piece of crap, carpet kit the previous owner had put on -- only to discover he had used buckets and buckets and buckets of carpet adhesive to tack/weld it down. I placed a call to the makers of Durabak (I've been told it's the same stuff), and they informed me the adhesive HAD TO BE REMOVED! You gotta be kiddin' me! I used a grinder, wire brush, and power sander... all to no avail... it only SMEARED the stuff. I had to resort to the very stuff the instructions told me to use -- Acetone (Xylene is basically the same thing - just evaporates slower). It took me over 8 hours to remove all that crap, and by the time I was done with the prep work I was totally exhausted... and STONED OUT OF MY GOURD from all the fumes (the only good thing about the whole project).

Applying the Herculiner itself was a breeze. I was pretty meticulous and it only took about 1 1/2 hours per coat.

A couple of pointers:

1. USE DISPOSABLE CLOTHES! Between the acetone and the Herculiner, you won't want to keep them.

2. WEAR GLOVES! For both the acetone and the Herculiner. The only way the Herculiner will come off... is when your skin comes off. TRUST ME! It's six days later and I still have some on my hands.

3. VENTILATE! Open all the doors you can. Better yet, work outdoors. I did more dain bramage on this project then in 4 1/2 years of college.

4. GET HELP! Misery loves company. Recruit volunteers. It will make life much easier.

Have fun!

Almost forgot... my tub also had some patchwork done by the previous owner. He used Aluminum, and did a surprisingly good job. The only problem is, if Herculiner has a weakness -- it's Aluminum. The manufacturer strongly recommends cleaning the Aluminum well, scuffing it, and applying an etching primer. I bought a rattle-can of etching primer at my local Napa and used it on the Aluminum and all the other bare metal. Went on easy, dried quick, and put my mind at ease.

Go easy! You're talkin' to a greenhorn.
 
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