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I'm mortified to even say this... So embarrassed... Humiliated... Something that a man never wants to have to admit to his peers. But....my dipstick broke! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/blush.gif Actually, the dipstick tube did. I don't know what in the world happened to it, but it cracked off at the base. (ya, I know...ouch) Paaaaalllllease tell me this is something I don't need to drop the oil pan for. Can a new one just be pushed in place? /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif Does it really hurt to drive that far without one? No oil leaks out.

Thanks....
~Tanner
 

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Get a cork or stopper of some sort to plug the hole and you can drive it fine for now. As far as the tube goes, no you cannot just tap another one into the hole. They usually extend a couple inches into the block/pan to keep the dipstick straight for an accurate reading. If you tap a new one in, the broken one will end up in the pan and could cause serious damage.

If there is any part of it sticking up you may be able to wiggle the broken portion out from up top. I suppose you could try to tap it through with a new one and fish it out the oil drain hole with a small magnet, but sounds nearly impossible to me.

Was it loose at all before it broke off? Maybe just the right size thread tap, started into the tube, then you could grip the tap and possibly wiggle it out. This would only work if the tube was a loose fit, otherwise I think the tap will expand the tube as it begins to cut threads and make it even harder to get out from up top.
 

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Actually the remains of the dipstick tube won't cause any problem in the crankcase. It's way too big to get sucked through the screen into the oil pump, not big enough to cause a significant blockage to the screen, and too heavy to rise high enough to get hit by the crank, which wouldn't cause engine damage anyway.

The problem with driving it into the engine is that it might be bottomed out in a counter-drilled hole, in which case it's not going to go any farther.

Most of the time though, there's a collar on the tube that sets its insertion depth. If it broke above that collar, you might be able to grab it with Vice Grips and work it out. If it broke below the collar, you should be able to drive it into the pan. In that case, you can try fishing it out with a magnet, but if that doesn't work, don't fret.
 

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What a common problem. The point where the dipstick tube exits the block is the point of maximum vibration. It flops around like a dead fish, and after 20, or so years, it cracks, and then breaks.

Sometimes I'm too stupid to know I can't do something, so I at least attempt it.

When my CJ7's Dipstick (it was the long tube that went from the block to up by the alternator) broke I just took a large wood screw and inserted it into the stub left in the block. I put a little downward pressure on the screw so the threads would slightly grab. Then I locked on a pair of vice grips on the screw and gently worked and lifted out the stub.

I then took a piece of scrap 1" length of 3/8" brake line. Then I took the two parts of the broken dipstick tube and drilled four (4) 1/16"holes at 90° apart about down 1/4" from the brake. I then inserted the 1" length of brake line into the the stub of the tube and rivet welded through the 1/16" hole to the brake line tubing. This was repeated for the remaining three holes. Then I inserted this assembly into the remains of the dipstick tube and repeated the process with the upper half of the dipstick tube.

Now the tube is stuck back together you can do a couple of things. You can seam weld the tube, or just use JBWeld around the seam. I chose to seam weld the tube and then grind down the welds, prime and paint the tube.

I then examined the rest of the tube and found one more place where the tube had actually rusted through with pinholes. So, you can guess what I did.

It's held for 9 years.
 

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im not sure if a jeep motor is similar to a chevy small block, but i happened to just the other day snap off a brand new oil dip stick tube in a nice new long block. stupid cheep speed shop chrome dip stick.

as a side note, an OEM GM stick is far better quality.

but, i was able to work out the old tube from the bottom with a punch. i'm not sure if that will work on a jeep motor, but two good hits with a thin punch against the bottom of the dip stick tube pushed it right out.
 

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Jim_Lou and LEVE are on the stick!

I've punched several through into the oil pan through the years and never hurt a thing.
If you have a 'bare' pan, the tube will roll around on the bottom where you can fish it out with a magnetic drain plug.
If you have a baffled pan, the tube will get trapped under the baffle and not hurt a thing.

When you install the new one, make sure you fabricate a tie down for the top of the tube!
Valve cover bolts work real well to anchor the tube.
If you do that, the new tube shouldn't self destruct.
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DON'T THREAD THE TUBE WITH AN 'EASY OUT' OR TAP!
Both will leave small shavings in your oil pan!
Nothing like sharpened steel shavings running loose in the oil to do significant damage!

Like LEVE did is OK, a large lag screw or wood bolt would be OK becuase it presses into the metal and doesn't cut the metal out to fall into the pan...
 
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