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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In an effort to find out what makes my 67's drivetrain "clunk" I am going to replace the TC that
is currently in the 67 with my spare D-20. I would like to know
what to look for on the D-20 while it is on the workbench.
(I married an Italian woman, and I now, after 31 years of marriage, have learned how to feel guilty about everything. I now feel guilty because I know that RRich is going to reply with a detailed account of what to do and I feel guilty about all the work he is going to put into it.)
But, on the other hand, I am sure we all will benefit from everybodys contributions. OK, I don't feel so guilty anymore. (Yeah, Right).
Thanks for all help offered.
Ross in Boulder Colorado
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Not a problem, just wish I could be there getting my hands dirty on it, typing is not my forte.
Before doing anything, rock the input vs output back and forth to see how much "slop" you get - remember it.

If it's still stuck to the trans, make sure the bearing retainer between the trans and T-case stays with the trans, otherwise you'll be doing both.

Start with the oil drag a magnet through it, look closely at the fragements it gets. It's normal to get very fine, rounded stuff, a little of it. Get worried if you see curly or longer pieces, it's a clue.
Let the oil settle in a warm place to let other stuff settle. After a few hours, pour off most of it, being careful not to let the sediments get out of your pan. Add some carb cleaner, solvent, or thinner to what's left to dilute it and kill the "sticky." Wash out the sediments into a clear jar - copper? Brass? Lots of it? More clues as to how much it's worn and what.

Make sure you have a manual that shows disassembly procedures to make life easy or at least have exploded views of it the right one.
Dissasemble it, clean everything squeaky clean, remember how everything went, which side thrust washers
were pointing etc. As needle bearings drop out be careful to count how many came out of each place. WRITE IT
DOWN! Keep each set separate.

Inspect with a magnifying glass remove burrs with a small stone like for knife sharpening. Be fussy.
Typical wear points are the intermediate gear inside where the needles ride, and the intermediate shaft itself. The gear is a little softer than the shaft, so it gets the wear. Look for ridges inside.

Thrust washers are sacrificial don't use them over again. Get a small parts kit when you re-assemble.

Now, to track down possible looseness. Reassemble each gear and shaft one at a time, use the old thrust washers as they were but do it dry and clean. Any grease or dirt will give you a false feeling. But you'll have to use some grease like Vaseline, to keep the intermediate bearings in place, unless you have the tapered roller bearing "silent" type.
Look for end play on all assemblies, like on the intermediate shaft. It should have slight end "wiggle" [Wightman] to let it expand when hot, but not much.

Take apart again after you know what's worn, replace those parts, use new bearings, needles, and thrust washers, lots of grease wheel bearing grease is fine, or assembly lube. You'll need heavy wheel bearing grease to keep the needles in.

As a matter of course, replace all bearings be carful not to impact the bearings putting them on. Push on the race
that's sliding on the shaft or in the housing, don't push so pressure is applied to the balls or rollers themselves. You can make drivers with pipe and tubing get creative.
Do not re-use needle bearings.

Sounds harder than it is. I doubt that's where the "clunk" is.

Rock input vs output back and forth, bet it's the same as before, but now you know everything fine in there.

98% is Understanding it
"Don't Fix Unless Broke"
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
OK, Rich. I've got it on the workbench, got almost nothing with the magnet, and very little of anything settled out.
Real clean. I looked at what I could after pulling the pan, and from what I could see, everything looked like it had no wear anywhere. There was almost no play in the shafts as I rotated them, in various combinations. So little that I am not all that sure that there was any at all. I am thinking I am very lucky. When I moved the TH-400 that it was bolted to, and it drained some transmission fluil out, It was in excellent condition. No "off" or burnt smell, and very red. Like I said before, I don't know anything about these two pieces' history.
Do you think it is worth it to dig in any farther? Since there is no slop, and that is what I am looking for in my 67, I am thinking that I might just swap the transfer cases out. I know it is a gamble, but what do you think?
Thanks for your help.
Ross in Boulder Colorado
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No filings, looks good, feels good, no rumble, no bumpiness in the bearings, I go ahead and put it in without further fuss.

Before taking out the driveshaft, measure the slip joint exactly where it sits when weight is on the wheels. I'm wondering if the slip joint is binding a little, when you put it in gear it sticks, then suddenly releases, making the noise. Once it's out of the car, put it back together on the bench and see if it's sticking. The splines eventually wear and make a notch that it catches on. If so, just dress the notches down with a small stone, rather than replacing it.
Reason I thought of this was my motorhome was doing weird. I'd start off from a full stop, it would roll about 5 feet then "clunk." Mounts, U-bolts etc were not loose. Fooled with it for several days till I found it. Then yesterday a friend called, told me his Chevy truck was "clunking."
Told him what to look for, called me back, "How did you know?" Not knowledge, just lucky. Seems like things come in 3's, so you're "IT."

Good Luck


98% is Understanding it
"Don't Fix Unless Broke"
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Rich
Since I am mainly looking for the "clunk" I should believe in my common sense. I will use the replacement transfer case, and kinda hope that the old one has a lot of play in it. I know that you have "been there, done that", removing something and hoping that is is broken or warn. It is frustrating to remove something and find nothing wrong with it.
After pulling the TC I will see if I can get any slop from the transmission output shaft. I will compare it to my spare (which I don't know the true condition of) but it may give me some insight. If the old TC is just as tight as the replacement, I think that I will just work my way backward untill I get to the hubcaps. It's gotta be there somewhere.
Wednesday the high temp here was 86 degrees. Thursday it was 34 degrees and snowing. That's life in Colorado. I love it. Today it is still snowing, and since I don't have a garage yet, I will have to wait until the ground dries out. I will keep you informed. If we can find the reason for the clunking, we will be Jeepster Heros.
Thanks again.
Ross in Boulder Colorado
[email protected]
 
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