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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Don't want to bring up the debate on the merits of each style.

I only have a question about flying rocks. If a rock should jump up and hit my fender, will the glass crack and spider, like it would on a vette? Or are these jeep tubs much thicker?

Carl, Tampa, FL, 74 CJ-5
If a Jeep can't take you there, Think twice about going..
 

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Jumping rocks shouldn't hurt. Flying rocks or rocks comming off your tires spinning at 4k thats the other answer.

 

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How did 'vettes get this reputation. I had a friend that owned a 'vette and was driving it in sub zero temps on the highway. The guy in front of him must have had trouble starting his car that morning because his hood wasn't latched well. The hood flew open and was ripped right off. The hood hit the 'vette, corner first, nearly dead center in the door. This knocked off the paint and made a small gouge in the gelcoat about the size of a quarter. Try that with a metal body.

When I built my dune buggy, I was a regular reader of Kitcar magazine. They did an article on repairing fiberglass. They chose to cause some damage to a front fender of a Saxton (Austin Healey replicar). First a large ball peen hammer was taken to the front fender. After several whacks caused no damage, they got out the big sledge hammer. Several more whacks and still no damage. Finally they bit into the fender with a 24" pipe wrench and managed to tear off a couple of chunks using leverage. Again try that with a metal body.

Ok, so on the con side, there are some surface cracks in the gelcoat on the very front of the hardtop for my '55 Thunderbird. Of coarse the top is 45 years old and resins have come a long way since 1955.

The truth is that a quality fiberglass body (I picked AJs) will stand a lot more punishment than a metal body ever could. If you should manage to cause some damage, fiberglass is much easier to repair, just save any large pieces.


 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Most Glass tubs i see have soft doors and tops....Can you hang full hard doors and a hard top on a glass tub without cracking?
Gene

 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I only ask cause my buddy got a huge crack from a flying rock on his vette. It's spidered across his whole back bumper now.

the fiberglass is significantly cheaper, but I've heard alot of guys in town here moaning about cracks, spider lines and durability on the glass tubs. The 4x4 guy here is recommending steel for me. I like the idea of glass but I don't want to be stuck repairing it all the time..

Carl, Tampa, FL, 74 CJ-5
If a Jeep can't take you there, Think twice about going..
 
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