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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gas Tank is fixed - and I\'m still alive...

Well, the gas tank is repaired and I'm still here. No major issues, and since it sparked so much debate, I thought I'd post the results...

I drained and then removed the tank, which is 26-gallon, made out of 10-guage steel, and there is 1/4" steel diamond plate "armor" already welded on the bottom and 3 inches up the sides and front and back - it's very heavy. I drained it by connecting a 5/16" fuel line to the feed port, and then connected that to one of those in-lint outboard fuel pumps, which I squeezed and that gets things going to drain into Jerry cans.

Once it was out, I tilted it up on end, and drained the remaining amount into a bucket, and then put that in a Jerry can too. Then I took it over to a gravel parking area I have, and filled it with water. As it filled up, you could see the fumes being pushed out the inlet holes - alot of fumes. So I did this 3 times, and then poured a gallaon and a half of bleach in there and sloshed that all around, and then did the water and drain thing one more time. By now, it smelled like old gas, and there really weren't any fumes. So then, I filled it with water again, and hile full of water, I got out the angle grinder and with a slicing wheel, cut the entire top out and then the entire bad side, leaving a 1/2" lip of steel to weld back on my patch panel.

After the two sides were cut out, I scraped the inside and then scrubbed it with SOS pads and dried it. Next, I welded in a new side of 1/8" steel, and two other patch panels. For those of you that have a tank like this (they sell them in the 4wd catalogs, but this one's a little bigger), they ruse between the angle iron mounting brackets and the tank itself. So that's what was repaired.

So after it was all repaired except with no top, I used a paint brush to apply sever successive coats of Bill Hirsch alcohol-proof tank sealer to all of the weld seems. I tested it with water without the sealer and it weeped in alot of places - even though the weld was textbook. After the sealer, it was great. Then I welded in the top. Now since I could no longer get in there, I just poured the sealer in, like your supposed to, and sloshed it all around - twice.

Now the tank is very nice, strong, and leak-prrof, and there was never any danger - I took alot of precautions. Thanks for the many ideas - this is what I have found to work well and what I recommend.

P.S. - I have used the Bill Hirsch sealer many times and for many years and I highly recommend it. I just knew that we were dealing with severe rot here, and was not comfortable with trying to use that alone for this repair. - Chuck

Chuck Hadley
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Re: Gas Tank is fixed - and I\'m still alive...

Chuck, glad to hear you're still with us. Sounds like you took a lot over precautions so you wouldn't go out in a blaze of glory, so to speak.
It's always better to be safe than sorry.

Gary
 

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Re: Gas Tank is fixed - and I\'m still alive...

/wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif When I used to take fuel tanks out before cuttin' up cars in the wreckin' yard, I noticed that most of them had some sort of fabric material between ANY metal to metal contact surfaces to prevent corrosion and chafing./wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gifNow bear in mind that these were pre-war clunkers in many cases, and a some post-war and early fifties iron as well. Nothin' late model at all, since this was in the early sixties..'61,62. But the point is that ANYWHERE that traps moisture rusts the tank. /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif

CJDave
I never believe any statistics unless my moonguys /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif/wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif made 'em up themselves.
 
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