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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, everyone knows that auto trannies use a flexplate and manual trannies use a flywheel. What I was wondering is why? What I mean is why can't you adapt a converter to a flywheel? Can you take the advantage of a heavy flywheel, like on a 225 V6,and adapt a converter and an auto tranny? Is there a reason why it wouldn't work? Just something that came to mind as I was doing my weekly run to Ohio and back. Anyone know if it wouldn't work or why?

C-Ya.....................kh
 
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you already have the weight of the converter, and due to a lack of a true mechanical connection between the engine and trans, a flywheels mass would be of no use. you would just be adding unneccessary weight to your drivetrain.

dan
NECESSITY IS THE MOTHER OF INVENTION
/wwwthreads_images/icons/cool.gifLET IT SNOW/wwwthreads_images/icons/cool.gif
 

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I agree, the torque converter is a heavy hp hog as is, more weight on the drive line would cause a noticable drop in performance. That's why race cars use aluminum flywheels, though illegal in most races.

/wwwthreads_images/icons/cool.gif Big Ed
'88 YJ, 4" susp,3" body,33's,283 Chevy V8,TH350,4.11's,D30,D35c
 

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/wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif There is one more little segment here that yew boahs is over lookin'./wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif What you're not thinkin' about is that there is a little thing called machining tolerances that you gotta be aware of. The fact is, by using a flex plate, the TIR (total indicated runout) on the face of the automatic transmission casting and the TIR on the back of the engine block can be a LOT higher than otherwise could be. If we had a flywheel bolted securely to the crank, and a converter bolted securely to the flywheel, the tolerances would have to be right on the money. I'm sure that you boys were still in a sandbox (if even that far) when the last GM Hydramatic rolled off the assembly line, but they DID have a true flywheel, and THIRTY-TWO bolts holding the converter on to it with a ring gasket, since the flywheel WAS the front half of the converter. In those days, the machining tolerances on the GM Hydramatics had to be EXACTO, or it broke off the end of the crank. I can just visualize the GM Engineering Dept, when some guy thought up the flex plate....what a RELIEF! Take it from someone who has taken those thirty-two bolts out many times with tranny fluid running down into my sleeves; you don't want to go back there. You don't want to give up the "FLEX" in flexplate, and you sure don't want to go back to thirty-two bolts. Trust me on that one./wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gifGM Hydramatics?? Am I really that old? SHEESH!/wwwthreads_images/icons/blush.gif

CJDave
I never believe any statistics unless my moonguys /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif/wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif made 'em up themselves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies. I was sure that someone would have tried it if it was possible. Thanks again.


C-Ya.....................kh
 
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