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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to replace my engine and have never done it before ,So what i would appreciate is opinions on the easiest way (besides paying someone else)LOL to do it probably by myself or with a little help.
1 seperate the engine from bell housing and pull seperatly
2 seperate from transmission and remove with bellhousing
3 pull engine and trans seperated at transfer case.
4 any other suggestions
I will probably remove the radiator and grill ,fenders if necessary.
All opinions will be greatly appreciated .
TIA

Learn to let go of what does not serve you ,but forces you to serve it
 

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Not sure what vehicle and year your pulling the engine from, I'm assuming a Jeep. Not sure which engine either. Not sure of what type of transmission, I'm assuming a manual transmission.

One of the best tips I can give about an engine replacement is make sure you mark all your electrical and vacuum connections. It might be a good idea to take some pictures. I usually remove the power steering pump / bracket assembly from the engine with the power steering hose attached, then tie the assembly out of the way. I do the same for an air conditioning compressor with hoses as well, if the vehicle is equiped with air conditioning. I recommend drain the oil from the engine before removing the engine. I use a wet/dry vacuum to get all the antifreeze from the engine block and radiator. I really hate oil and antifreeze spills, plus antifreeze can be fatal to a pet dog or cat.
Usually I remove the engine from the bellhousing. Then hoist the engine out. This method makes for a more difficult installation. Getting the input shaft of the transmission out of the crankshaft pilot bushing/bearing is easy, but not so easy to reassemble with a new pilot bushing/bearing. Support the transmissing bellhousing before removing the engine with a floor jack. Sometimes being able to raise or lower the bellhousing a few inches can assist getting the engine out. I use rope to tie the bellhousing up to the firewall after the engine is removed.
It's alot of work, is your wallet that thin? LOL
dave

 

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I have an '80 CJ7 same as you. I am on the third engine and didn't remove the tranny or t-case either
time. Definitely remove the radiator. You can just remove the power steering pump from the engine and
hang off to the side, do not remove the hoses. Same with A/C if you have it. Disconnect fuel lines and
all those pesky wires. Tag the wires so you know where they go back. Look for more wires, you will
always miss one or two. You can remove the carb and dist to prevent damage. Now chain it up
to a hoist and lift until the chain is just snug.

I'm assuming manual transmission, so unbolt the bellhousing from the engine and unbolt the motor
mounts. Lift until you can see light under the motor mounts and pull the engine forward. The 258 is
pretty long, but it will come out even without removing the grille.

Change the throwout bearing, and transfer whatever pieces need to be to the new engine. Check the
clutch, pressure plate and flywheel if you are reusing them. Just reverse the steps to get the new
engine in. When you get the new engine lowered into the engine bay, get it lined up with the
transmission and push the engine back. You may have to rotate it a little from side to side to get the
splines to line up with the clutch. If the clutch won't line up put the tranny in gear and try again.

I did this twice by myself with no problems. The second time I replaced the 258 with a 305 TPI but I
cheated, the whole body was off and at the paint shop when I did it.


 
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I usually remove a CJ 4.2l by removing the grille shell with the wiring and radiator still attached. There are only 6 bolts to the fenders (1/2"heads), one bolt under the center of the grill shell (5/8" head), and the 2 support rods to loosen. Unplug the wire harness at the firewall, the 2 sockets to the side markers, the horn and the washer pump wires, and fold the harness on top of the radiator. Remove the radiator hoses and cooler lines if equipt, then lift off the complete assembly. Unless all of your bolts are rusted in place, this should only take 15 minutes to do! (If you have A/C, you will have to disconnect the lines too). This leaves plenty of room to remove the engine and you could even remove it with the trans and t-case attached! If you don't want to pull the trans out, I usually remove the 2 bolts on the bellhousing that hold on the clutch linkage belcrank, then remove the (4) 5/8" headed bolts that hold the trans to the bellhousing. It takes much less time to remove it this way, and by making guide studs that fit into the belhousing, realining the trans to the engine is easier. You don't normally need to remove the fenders, but if you are going to repaint the firewall after the engine is out, removing them would let you do a better job of it. As far as the engine itself, I normally unplug the main engine harness at the firewall and where it connects to the starter solenoid and fan motor and lay it on top of the engine as it is being removed. If you are not sure you will remember where all the wires go, be sure to tag them and/or write down which color wire went where. Also, plug off the fuel lines with caps or plugs as necessary (disconnect them at the framerails) I've found that the engine removed as a complete assembly is easier to handle as far as swapping out parts to the new engine is concerned, and if you also remove the trans and t-case, realignment of them is much easier out of the chassis. This is the way the factorys assemble them! Hope this gives you some more ideas, good luck!

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks all this is totally great advice from people who have done the 258 extraction.LOL....just what I was looking for .I was just a little concerned abouy the weight of the engine trans. as a unit .because of the legnth I thought it would be kinda tippy towards the rear.
but keep em coming I am sure anyone who has done it would have some more suggestions from experience ,what to look out for etc.
I have ordered the engine and I have frame plates from M.O.R.E. on the way to fix the frame cracks
and my pockets are already empty and inside out not even any lint left in them .LOL
Got Pockets

Learn to let go of what does not serve you ,but forces you to serve it
 
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Use a strong chain attatched to the rear head bolt/stud and the front headbolt/stud. Bias the hook from the hoist to the rear and the driveline will balance out nicely. It might be a worry if you are running a trans such as the 200 LB NV4500, but most late CJ transmissions are very light weight.

 
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