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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought these Optimas a few months ago but just now finished the project. It's hard to see in the picture but the batteries are supported underneath (not by the hold downs). I made the tray from 18 ga. sheet metal. The gray sheet metal on the right side & bottom is a heat shield w/ 1" air gap (not the support tray). This is because of the proximity of the headers, which I also wrapped with glass tape. This should help with any heat build up problems. As you may know heat kills batteries. Note the marine style post clamps (wing nuts). Yes, those cables are 1/0 gage, premium quality, fine strand copper welding cable. Let me tell you they are not even close to a good quality battery cable, these babies are awsome. If your going to be pushing the amps it's the only way to go. The lugs are solid copper, soldered, not crimped. Then the whole cable was shrink tubed in the appropriate color. Corrosion shall not be a factor here! Since most lugs I found have a very loose hole for the stud, I bought lug with a smaller stud size and drilled them out to just fit the stud. If you know why then you get points for listening to CJ Dave, It's all about footprint (contact area). See the solenoid on the inner fender? That connects one battery to the other. I considered every method for battery management, but in the end I took CJ Dave's advice and used the constant duty solenoid controlled by an oil pressure switch. Unless there is oil pressure (motor running, not just ignition on) the second battery is isolated. If the motor is running, it's charging. That's what I like simplistic solutions. Thanks Dave!

If anybody is really interested in more pics of the tray (I even have AutoCAD drawings)let me know. Or if you want more details on making up those killer battery cables there are some minor tips I discovered along the way.

1968 CJ-5 225 V6/T14/18/27frt/44rr

If life gets boring, risk it!
 

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You got really good advice from someone!
I use 2/0 (not 2 Ga.) for everything starting system related.
You should really crimp the connections, then solder with a silver bearing, rosin core solder.

Why...
Crimping makes a mechanical connection that can not be broken.
Soldering makes a solid electrical connection, and seals out the weather.
Silver bearing solder will 'tin' the cables great, melts at a lower point so you don't melt your insulation, and will stick when nothing else will.
Rosin core so it doesn't affect the joint. Acid core will eat the wiring up in a matter of weeks.
Heat shrink to get the correct colors at the ends, and to seal the weather out. Use the heat shrink with the 'glue' in it.

All in all you did a really great job!
I would have never thought of mounting the batteries on end like that....

All you need now is a fuel bladder, fuel injection, and a dry sump oiling system, and you could drive up-side-down of you could get it to stick to anything up there...
Velcro tires maybe..

Great job!
Later, Aaron.

If a tree falls in the forrest, and there is no woman around to hear it, is the man still wrong?
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Do you have the CAD drawings on a website? I am interested in them as I have 2 new Exide Oribtial gel cell batteries waiting to be installed in my CJ-8 as soon as I make a tray and figure out how I want to wire them. Where did you get the oil switch and the solenoid you used. Any more infoand pic's would be helpful. What's you e-mail address.

Thanks,
Barry Shaw
[email protected]
http://www.geocities.com/MotorCity/Downs/4994
 

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/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif Awesome, Joe....really awesome. My moonguy bunch/wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif/wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif cannot take their eyes off it!/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif

CJDave
I never believe any statistics unless my moonguys /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif/wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif made 'em up themselves.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What is the market source for the lugs? I'm having a hard time locating something so simple! Advise us all as to what the tips you have for making the connections are. Also, what is the market source for the fancy shrink tube?
TIA
sln


 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quick question.....what is the cause of corrosion on a battery. I just noticed recently that I have acid acummulating on the battery. I have also hear that coke will also help taking it off. True or myth?


 

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/wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif Coke DOES help....especially on a real hot day. You could get overheated scrapeing crud off the posts and cables so you need a coke break. I'm hoping one of our resident chemists will jump in on this one and give us the real reaon why./wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif

CJDave
I never believe any statistics unless my moonguys /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif/wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif made 'em up themselves.
 

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I don't know why it forms, but baking soda in water will take it off. It foams up like it's eating your whole battery, but leaves it clean and shiny. I suspect that loose or dirty connections at least helps corrosion form. I know that dielectric grease helps prevent it, but where the heck do you get dielectric grease?

I liked the Coke line, CJDave.

Loose nut behind the wheel
Another right-wing conservative.....
Born and raised in Jeep-Town
 

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Holy smokes! I sure hope you got a lock on that hood. You have too much money invested in the two batteries alone not to. Take it from someone who THOUGHT they had a dead battery last summer - GET A HOOD LOCK!!! Even the dirt cheap ones are better than none because someone looking for a battery to steal is looking for an easy target: the SWB Jeep! Yes, I know if they want the battery bad enough, even a $300 lock wont stop them.

I would like to take a look at your AutoCAD drawings - but do they work on AutoCAD LT? If so, please send them to my address. [email protected]

TIA
 

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Here's my understanding of Lead Acid battery post corrosion and a corrective action:

1. Any bi-metal joint is a junction. This junction can act like a battery if water is present. The more the two metals are dissimilar, the higher the energy level. The higher the water presen (humidity) the higher the corrosion.
2. As the joint reacts, a DC current is formed. Don't confuse this with the battery supply. It's the current formed by the joint itself. The reaction of the water acts as a catalyst and the joint starts to corrode. The corrosion acts as a resistance to the current and the process intensifies and the corrosion seems to grow before your very eyes. Soon several volts are droppeed just trying to overcome the resistance
3. Battery Acids do leach out of the case, and are carried out the battery in the form of gas. As the battery heats, it does out-gas. Even so called sealed, low maintenance and maintenance free batteries vent electrolyte condensation. The vents are much smaller than in the "old days." This electrolyte condensation combines with the humidity and guess where it's effects are seen most often? Most often around the battery! You'll see the effects on the tray, battery case, battery posts, cable connections and the battery cable in and under the insulation.
4. Correction:
a. To minimize corrosion switch to a Maintenance Free battery, gel-cell or Optima style battery. These batteries vent electrolyte condensation.
b. Use the little green and red "Anti-Corrosion" felt washers at the base of the battery.
c. Clean the battery posts and the cable connector with a post cleaner. It's a set of wire brushes made for the purpose.
d. Pouring Coke over the top doesn't help, drink the coke! Using Baking Soda is only the first step. It neutralizes the electrolyte condensation, and effectively "halts" the corrosion. This is good to get the corrosion on the case and battery tray neutralized. Then wash it off with distilled water and dry. Then examine the metal of the tray and sand, prime and paint.
e. For the Battery itself, the use of grease has been mentioned in previous posts. What does the grease do? The grease does not act as a dielectric. It acts as a moisture barrier. Pure and simple.
f. What type of grease do I use? If it's grease, and won't melt under higher temps (100 degrees F) then can use it. Vaseline and Petroleum Jelly will melt at lower temps. The Dielectric grease used on Spark Plug boots is good, so is wheel bearing grease and white lithium grease.
g. How is it best applied? After burnishing down the battery post and cable connector
1. Smear a light coat of grease on the mating surfaces.
2. Put the connector over the connection and lightly tighten it down.
3. Turn the connector slightly to the left and to the right.
This should find the high point of an out of round post, and grease any pits.
4. When you find a little resistance, halt.
5. Lightly re-tighten the connection.
6. Repeat steps 4 through 5.
7. Tighten down the clamp bolt.
h. Put grease on the top of the battery post/clamp.
i. Put grease between the bottom of the battery post and the felt washer.
j. If you can, use plastic covers for the post and connector.


Good Jeepin'

Larry
 
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