Off Roading Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What to do, what to do?
Here is my situation and questions. Back a while ago I put on a 4" BDS lift. Of course I had drive line vibes so I shimmed the rear and droped the t/c. Well I hated everything about that t/c drop, So this weekend I took it out. Suprise now I have drive line vibs and need to fix it; so here are the questions. BTW this is a 258/t-176/300 to an amc 20.
1. if I run no shims (have the u-jointt angle the same on both ends. will my angles be to much? I think so. and this is where my follow up questions come from since I think I need to go to a cv joint shaft.
2. does anyone know approx how many degrees I need to shim the rear so it points to the t/c output?
3. what is the torque setting for the yoke on the t/c that has to be changed? Also this seems pretty easy to do, is it?

thanks to anyone that can help me out here, I am trying to save the time of having to take out shims, put in shims, take out shims put in shims.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,394 Posts
/wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif Brent......the shim will depend on so MANY things,/wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif and would be tough to even ballpark. Just back off the u-bolts....drive a thick cold chisel in there from one side, and keep tapping till there is zero angle in the rear, relative to the driveline...that is the pinion shaft is in line with the driveline. Then you can check to see how thick the shim needs to be...adding for the amount of necessary thickness on the thin end of the shim....and maybe a degree or two down angle to allow for wrapup of the axle. Yeah, this is easy to do. The output shaft yolk is torqued to 120-150 Ft-Lbs. TRANSFER CASE ONLY....NOT the differential! Repeat...TRANSFER CASE ONLY...not the rear end yolk! Oh, did I mention not to torque the yolk on the differential? You shouldn't have to take it off anyway./wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif

CJDave
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Dave. I guess I need to go ahead and call tom woods and give him the specs. That is a great idea about using a chisel to find the correct angle.
another thing though, and this maybe a stupid question but what do you use to find the angle at the joint?



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,394 Posts
/wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif You are trying to get the u-joint at the rear axle to zero with the shaft....as if the shaft were solid into the rear end....with just a hint of down angle to allow for windup. You can mock this up using thin wood stakes and c clamps to approximate the CV joint and get you the length of the driveline, then wait till the driveline is ready and shim finally to zero it to the rear end./wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif

CJDave
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Here's how I determined how much shim was needed to point the pinion at the CV joint. First thing you need is an angle finder. They are readily available at places like Home Depot or Sears tool department. Once I had the new driveshaft, I installed it without any shims. I then attached the angle-finder to the tube of the driveshaft and recorded that angle. Next, I put the angle finder on the pinion yoke and recorded that angle. The best place to put it is on the face of the yoke where the u-bolt holes are. Just make sure that this face is as close to vertical as possible. Subtract one angle from the other and divide that number by two. This is how much shim you need. In my case I had twenty-two degrees from horizontal on the driveshaft tube and five degrees at the yoke. I put in an eight-degree shim which points my yoke within one-degree of directly at the CV to allow for slight spring wrap. It works great with no vibration at all. As long as you are within three degrees of straight on, you should be ok. Also, Rubicon Express can supply you with steel shims which won't flatten out like the aluminum ones.

 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top