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Hi, I have a question, If I was to build a dual purpose rig, is there a downside to use a Diesel powertrain?

Never really noticed if some of the "homemade" rigs had diesel engine, was just wondering...

Thank you
 

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A downside?

Well, initially the cost. Also consider the cost of diesel fuel. Aside from that, if this is going to be owned long enough to pay back the costs (by way of mileage) then it's a solid option.


Depending on what you do offroad, a big diesel's weight can be a con.

I drove a small 3.1TD in Japan and it was a great daily driver. Now I'm in a Cummins 5.9L as my dd.
 

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Some of the pros to having a vehicle with a diesel offroad are:

*Usually increased fuel mileage over a gas engine delivering a similar amount of power.

*You'll have a somewhat unique vehicle.

*You'll be able to run biodiesel, veggie oil, waste veggie oil, or virtually anything combustable with the right mods (usually pretty cheap mods). Remember the diesel engine was originally designed to run on peanut oil.

The cons to swapping in (or buying factory made) diesel are:

*Diesels are typically heavier since they have to withstand harsher conditions than a gas engine (much higher compression, etc).

*Diesels are relatively rare off road, and if you happen to run out of fuel or are in a more remote area, fuel can be hard to come by.

*You'll have a unique vehicle, meaning you'll have to figure out what parts on the engine you've chosen are a weak link and carry them, since it might not be such a common engine, and some backwoods parts store might not carry parts for it.
 

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i dont see downside. i dont drive my off road rig enough to worry about fuel mileage.

id love to have 4bt cummins in my blazer. i say 4 bt because itl be much cheaper then finding a 6cil cummins. the 4bts can be found in frito lay trucks
 

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I think there's more trade-offs with a diesel 4x. The noise and the stinky fumes to name two.

When I ran the Dusy Irshim trail in '94, two V8 gas engines ran out of fuel before the end of the trail.
 

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Low levels of traffic pollution can harm healthy adults.
Traffic fumes are linked to respiratory diseases.
Traffic pollution has been blamed for tens of thousands of deaths every year across Europe.
Car exhausts pump out a noxious combination of chemicals � cause of cancer
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Bill runs into billions
They calculated that the cost of dealing with all this at the time was �27 billion per year.
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a diesel is an awesome choice. They're fuel misers from the word go, the run forever, and actually are easier to maintain. The downsides are that most of them will leak a little.....they have higher compression than a gas engine and the head gaskets loosen up a little after a while..but it's normal. True, they can be cantankorous to start in the winter, but just make sure that you have either around if it doesn't have glow plugs, and if it has glow plugs and they're functioning properly, then you should have much trouble starting it..but plug it in if it gets around 0 F. The other thing you can expect is the smell of diesel on your floor mats...face it, diesel is an 'oil'..and any spilled at the service station doesn't evaporate like gas will..and in turn it will get on the bottoms of your shoes, which in turn will get to your floor mats. Rubber floormats are recommended. In colder climates...or colder times of year(below freezing) you can run into a problem known as 'gelling'. Diesel fuel likes to solidify in freezing temps, and unless you have 'blended' (a mixture of #1 and #2 diesel) in these climates, you should make sure that you have some kind of anti-gell. This is sold at most service stations or auto stores. There are also products that will re-liquiefy gelled fuel. If you do end up gelling up it's a great idea to have an extra fuel filter with...because then you can dump some of the treatment in the tank, fill the spare filter with the anti-gel, and be back on the road in 5-10 minutes.
 
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