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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1998 Jeep TJ and was wondering if I put ARB's in the front and don't turn it on when in four wheel drive will my front left tire still spin as it does now. Or will I have to engage it to spin. I would like to be able to lock 3 wheels (2 back, 1 front) in snowy weather.

Thanks for any help!

98TJ

 
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I believe your right about how the front axle will work. With the arb off you will basically have 3 wd, Allowing for easy turning in 4wd. With the arb on in 4wd you have true 4wd (if you have a posi or locker in rear axle). You will get the best of both that way.

 
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Not sure exactly what you are asking, but if the ARB in the front is not activated, your front axle is open. It's just like you had no locker at all. Whichever wheel looses traction, that wheel would spin and the other would not. When you activate the ARB, the axle is fully locked. Both wheels turn at the same rate. No differential action at all. Turning to the right or left, particularly on ice or snow, would be virtually impossible. Slicker the roadway, straighter the path of the vehicle regardless of the direction the front wheels are turned. Combine that with a rear locker when it too is in a locked condition and you have a single direction vehicle. It will not change directions at all on very slick roadway.

Doug '97 TJ
My Web Site
 
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Warning" DO NOT USE LOCKERS ON SNOW AND/OR ICE. You need to read up on what lockers, especially ARB's do, they lock all four wheels into turning the same speed. on snow and ice, that is not what you want, you'll never be able to turn on ice, because the front and back wheels will all be driven at the same speed..kind of like a dog's legs all going at the same speed, he's never gonna be able to turn..

My third Wrangler: 99 Sahara (desert sand)
 

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/wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif Yep, Richard speaks the truth. In snow, we try to leave our Grand Cherokee in "open" FWD, because it picks it's way through snow and icy stuf so much better. On our CJ SNOJEEP, we are even taking out the limited slip in the Quadra-Trac for the same reason./wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif

CJDave
 
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As a follow up to the snow-locker question. How about a true trac posi in the rear and an open dif in the front for snow and ice. the true trac is scheduled in 2 weeks for my ZJ
your thoughts woould be appreciated.

danm


 

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This is why I bought an air locker for the rear. Unlike other positive track systems, I get full control over
it.

I do my wheelin' in the snow, and I love it. I leave the air locker open normally. If and when I get stuck
I simply push a button on the dash to lock up the rear axles to get out. Limited slip differential have a
tendency to lock up unexpectedly. I have a friend who was swung into a utility pole when the differential
in his YJ locked with one wheel on ice and the other on dry pavement.


 
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/wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif I think you are not getting what 98tj is trying to say./wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif

I ,m more than likely wrong but i think his quistion is if he has one wheel
locked by the air locker and the other open. You unlock the tj front axle
just on one side on the axle proper like some or all YJ's right??????????
That way that wheel is open for stability?????? Is this right 98TJ?????
 

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I think you are right, Greg, about what he is asking.

If you do not engage the ARB in the front and leave the Jeep in 4wd, the front axle will act like a normal open differential axle (because that is what it is). That means that the wheel with the least amount of traction will spin but not necessarily the left one. Hope I'm reading you correctly, 98tj! /wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif
 

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Gregg, my former reply was in response to the later posts not the original question. That is a problem
with this format that it doesn't show that we went a little astray and branched off into a sub thread.

To stay on subject with the original question, no, air lockers don't work that way. You cannot lock just
one wheel to the ring gear. It either locks both axles to the ring gear or works as an open differential.

Unlocked, the ring gear turns a housing which holds the spider gear shafts, the spiders can turn on the
shafts. The spider gears engage with another pair of gears, one on each side, which actually turn the
axles. Looking at both extremes, if both tires have equal traction and the vehicle is going straight, then
the spiders do not turn on the shafts and transmit power to both wheels equally. If only one wheel has
traction and the other is allowed to spin freely, the ring gear turns the spider shafts, but the side with
traction cause the spider gears to spin on the shafts which causes all of the power to go to the axle with
no traction AND to spin it at twice the normal rate.

Locked, both axles are in effect locked to the ring gear and both axles turn at exactly the same rate as
the ring gear.

Again with respect to the original post, you wouldn't even want to leave the rear axle locked on ice or
snow as it would tend to PUSH the front end around corners meaning that you would not have good
steering control. RichardM's warning" DO NOT USE LOCKERS ON SNOW AND/OR ICE." was a litlle
overstated as long as your speed is less than about 3 miles per hour and you have no obstructions
around you. Also, It would take two lockers, both engaged to lock all four wheels. He gave good advice
about reading about lockers. I read, and I selected the air locker. There is no ultimate, just the best one
to fit your driving style.

 
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Thnaks for the reply on snow and limited slip.
BTW since el nino and la nina have eliintated almost all snow from eastern pa of any depth, I am waiting on a normal winter to practice my deep snowdriving with a 4x4 (GC). I have the new BFG AT. What depth of snow do you drive without getting high centered. I will find out myself eventually but a little forwarning would be great.

Thanks for the input from all you fellow northerners that actually have snow to drive in.

danm

 

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High Centering is more dependant on snow type than depth. Heavy wet snow or hard wind drifted snow will high center a vehicle when it is only up to the pumpkins or the transfer case. I have driven through soft powerdery drifts that were litterly over the roof of the vehicle. Be forwarned though. Once a drift is broken open, the wind packs snow in more dense each time. Until, as stated earlier, if its deep enough to reach the pumpkins, you will get high centered.

Enjoying Montana's Big Sky (& rocks & rivers & mountians etc, You get the picture.)
 
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