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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,...

Wheeling brings up all kinds of dirt which tends to sit every where. One of the areas that I am reluctant in attacking with a HP steam cleaner is the negine bay. Now I have seen these engine cleaners which are spray on and rinse of. Has anybody used them? What would you use after wards to cover the engine bay after wards? WD-40?

Any suggestions welcome /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif

BlueJay
93 YJ with upgrades (and it is Blue!)
 

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/wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif There are two things which you can wreck with a pressure washer under the hood. ONE is the fuel pump on most diesels....the water shrinks the case and the internals; which fit closer than anything known to man; just grind themselves to shreds. THE OTHER is most black boxes. Water is dynamite on computer stuff, and the little black-box components. Just about everything else is OK to wash. WD would be good for after-wash if it was a moist, dustless climate. WD-40 is oil with a propane carrier......excellent for starting diesels. It's gentle and doesn't dry out the cylinder walls. /wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif I find I can go a long way with high pressure air and a shop vacuum./wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif

CJDave
 

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I've been power washing my engines for years. I do it when the engine is cold, not hot. Don't spray into the air cleaner or carb. You can cover them with a plastic bag if yours is open. The spray type engine cleaners work pretty well to cut oil and grease, but for just dirt and mud just water will get most of it off. With electronic ignition there's seldom any problem with getting it wet. You can spray wires with silicone afterwards, but that stuff seems to make dust stick to it and look dirty very soon.

Loose nut behind the wheel
Another right-wing conservative.....
Born and raised in Jeep-Town
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
One other thing: watch out for the distributor cap. Make sure that it is 100% sealed. Water in the distributor, well, lets just say it SOUNDS expensive when you try to start back up! (it was on another vehicle of mine...)/wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif

You will be calling AAA for a tow!

Jon-YJ94
a work in progress
[email protected]
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If you do get water in the distributor, just spray the inside of it with WD-40. It will start right up.

80 CJ7 350, SM465, and lifted 4"
98 KX250
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'll tell a story here. It will illustrate just what is happening here with this thread.
A pair of main thoroughfares near my home years ago used to flood for a couple of hundred yard s each direction from the intersection. I had a '69Chevelle hot rod with rusted body. Work car but not the primarty family vehicle. I would get a can of WD40 and spray the secondary wires. Just the secondary and distributor cap. Then I would go out the flooded area. And drive through the water up half way on the doors. Others would watch me and figure they could do the same. NOT! Now they are dead in the water (no pun here) and wondering what happened! I would walk out in the water wearing an old field jacket inside of which (out of sight) would be the can of WD40. Nonchalantly I would inform the driver that for a small stipend I would get them on their way in just a few minutes if they were interested. They would look around at the lake in which they were stalled and break fingernails getting to their money. It was never less than $5 and sometimes as much as $20. I'd take their money and tell them to pop the hood. Hood up and lean over the engine and reach into the coat sneaking out the can of WD and spray the secondary wiring (10 seconds) and back into the coat with the WD and go to the other side and repeat and hit the dist. cap at the same time (another 10 or 12 seconds). Stand up, shut the hood and tell the driver to start it up. Sometimes they would argue at this point but I would just insist that they start it up. Then it was just a matter of trying to keep a straight face when their recently dead vehicle would start RIGHT up and just purr. 4, 6 or 8 cylinders, foreign or domestic, water or air cooled, old or new, fancy or plain, it NEVER failed to work for me. Some times I'd make a cool hundred in a hour or so.
Point is that most of the time it is not the electronics or water inside the distributor cap, it is secondary leakage through spark plug wires and terminals at the cap or plugs and the water path to ground. WD drives the water away and presto/chango all of the plugs fire again.
JMTCW
sln
WD is good but the best is LPS 1. With it you can run your motorcycle dirt bike point ignition mag system under water without a mag cover and you can cut two holes in your distributor cap and spray inside and then hood the garden hose to cap and have full water flow through it and never have it miss a single fire. I have helped demo this.
sln

 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I wash my YJ ,including the engine bay, every couple of weeks or so using high pressure water pump. You have to make sure that water doesn't go where it's not supposed to. Here's how.

Stuff you do once:
1) Open the distributor cap and seal it with regular silicon.
2) Put a small amount of silicon inside boots of the spark plug wires. The silicon should be around the end of the boot so that it seals with the spark plug body, don't put silicon inside where the electrode is. Don't forget the boots on the distributor cap and on the coil.

Every time you wash the engine bay:
1) Cover the air filter(s) with a plastic bag to prevent it from getting wet. That includes the filter for the air compressor if you have one.
2) Some vehicles have the vent hoses from the axles and transmission end in the engine bay. Locate them and plug them so that water doesn't get into the axles while you wash the engine bay.
3) Try to reduce the pressure a bit so that it doesn't yank any small wires.

Hope this helps

 

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I been high pressure my toyota work truck at the shop once a month for the last 10 years no problem. And I really go after it, I love a clean motor. But a Ford ranger 2.8 v6 just think about getting it wet and it will not run. So I guess it depends on motors. For degreaser we use "SIMPLY GREEN" at the shop.

brownbagg
 

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Although I've never personally encountered any problems doing underhood cleaning (usually at the car wash).....certain year vehicles have relays that respond poorly to "other than Incidental" contact with water. I've known two friends with mid 80's full size Fords and intermediate Chev's that needed work after an engine cleaning.


GeeAea

 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I've been using GUNK brand engine degreaser since I had my 1st car, which is longer ago than I want to think. Just cover the distributor and open air cleaner with foil or plastic. Works great and is CHEAP./wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif If you do get a little water under the distributor or coil, WD works great.

Brad (from the 4 Wheeling center of the universe, 4 corners USA)
 
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