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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think its about time I delve into Farmjeep's carb. It is still the stock 2 barrel motorcraft resting on a stock intake manifold, on the ol' 304. Having never rebuilt any carbs (other than single barrel tractor carbs, which doesn't really count), I am a bit nervous. Should I dive headfirst in and do er? Or should I take her somewhere to get worked on by a pro? I'm assuming that I want to pull her off the engine to rebuild her, but if I do that, how do I know what size jets to use and such? What are the secrets of the trade? Any other information that may help you...It has a manual carb (cable operated)...uhh...and a big, fat K&N sitting up on top.

Measure once, cut twice...or is that the other way around?
 

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By all mens attempt the rebuild.
GUNK makes a 1 gal. can of Carb & parts cleaner with a small parts basket included inside for abut $10. The part number is CC-3K, and it is the best environmentally responsible stuff I have seen over the counter. You can get it at some of the discount auto parts stores.

Start by using a piece of that blue styrofoam board, and stick all of the parts you take out or off into it in order.
If you need to draw pictures on it for orientation, have at it!
Use a different part of the styrofoam board for different levels in the carb.
IE: Over here is the stuff that came off of the top, and over here is the stuff from inside, and over in this corner is the stuff from the throttle body on the very bottom.

Get one of the kits that has an exploded view of all of the parts.
Most rebuild kits come to cover several model years, so don't panic if more parts come in than you took out.
If you have a manual for your year model see if it has rebuild instructions. Every little source helps.
My memory isn't what it used to be, so I keep several sources. You never know when one of them is going to show a part from a different angle, or something that only came out on one model year, the year you are working on.

If the kit comes with new check balls, use a caliper to verify size, and use the new ones.
Once you get the hang of it, you will be able to do a complete rebuild in about two hours, and that includes waiting for the parts to soak in the cleaner.

Word to the wise, make sure you keep the check balls separated, and you know what bores they came out of. I don't remember any trick questions in the motorcraft carbs, but there are some that are a major disaster if you get a ball in the wrong bore, or the wrong length screw in the holes on say the old Holleys or any of the British carbs.

Hope this helped, Aaron.

When a fool and a wise man argue, Onlookers can't tell the difference...
 

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Good advise from TeamRush. Try it. Even I could do it. Instructions will likley come with your rebuild kit. But I don't like the idea of styrafoam and cleaning fluids. It can melt and leave a residue. I was going to clean a lawnmower carb once, left it in cleaner in a foam bucket. When I returned, the carb was there but the bucket had melted.

 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Another litle helpful idea is to use a video camera. Film each little piece of where it goes and how it comes out. Have a buddy film why you are doing the disassembling. I did it once on a motor rebuild and it came in really handy.
Steve

 

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The only thing I will add here is to check the throttle shaft bushings before you even begin. Run the motor at idle, and spray some carb cleaner around the throttle shaft bushings. If you hear any change in RPM of the motor, you are leaking air past the bushings, and a gasket rebuild from a box will likely do you little good. I have heard that you can get slightly larger diameter throttle shafts, and ream out the worn bushings for the larger shaft. Not sure if these are available for all carbs - guys like TeamRush could probably answer that better, and give you more direction as to what is the best course of action if you do find that condition. Maybe some of the better auto parts places could press in new bushings for you, and you could get a new shaft.

Another thing to keep in mind is that some people like really heavy throttle return springs - I have a friend like this. He likes the heavy, solid feel. This puts higher loads on your throttle shaft bushings, and would lead to faster wear.

Good luck
Pete

88YJ, 4"susp, 33"BFGMT, 9k#winch, rear homemade swingout, reb.258, 999, 4.10, weber32/36, GMHEI.
 

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/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif One more hint: When you slide the throttle plates back in place, don't tighten the screws till both are in place, then close the throttle till they touch and then with a slight pressure holding the throttle closed, tighten the screws. That will get the perfect alignment in the bores and make it idle better. You can do the same with the single choke plate to align it as well. It is almost a lead-pipe cinch that you will need to bush the shaft, so just take the base to the local machine shop and have them boys do it for you if there is no stock kit to do it./wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif Oh, and one more thing. Pay attention to those little balls as TeamRush cautioned, and WATCH FOR ALUMINUM BALLS....as I recall some carbs do have them, and you can't drop a steelie in where an aluminum came out, so be sure as you dismantle the carb to notice if some are and some aren't aluminum. Make sure that you know where each ball came from. /wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif You probably know more about rebuilding a carb now than half the guys in the corn belt.....congratulations!/wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif

CJDave
I never believe any statistics unless my moonguys /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif/wwwthreads_images/icons/wink.gif made 'em up themselves.
 

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OK, I guess I mis-spoke.
The foam is a template to make sure all of the parts you took out of the carb are accounted for. Solvent shouldn't be used on the styrofoam, or it will turn to goo.
You can punch holes in cardboard to do the same thing, but I just like the way the foam worked.
The foam template will verify all of the parts made it through the clean & dry process.
If you have parts that look similar, but serve different functions, the do one set, then the other so they don't get mixed up.

After the parts come out of the parts cleaner, wash them thoroughly with clean hot water, and dry them with compressed air. It is mandatory that you get all of the solvent off of the parts, so the hot water is the logical choice.

Don't drop them in a filthy parts washer like a lot of places do. The solvent residue from the gunk that the parts washer has in it will contaminate the gasket surfaces, and suspended particles can find their way into the small passages of the carb parts.
Blowing compressed air through them will only drive the contaminants further into the carb body...

We are making things sound much more difficult than it actually is. That carb is small and real simple. I'm sure it's only slightly more difficult than the old tractor Carbs you have already rebuilt. Just remember to soak the Venturi body for at least an hour, and blow the passages out good, wash it in hot water, and blow them out again.

If you have stubborn alkali buildup in the carb (white or gray scale) that you can't get out,
try a toilet bowl cleaner called 'The Works'. It's in a blue and white bottle, and is real cheap. It is also pretty caustic, so take proper precautions.
(It gives Holley float bowls their color back too!)

I'm with Pete on the throttle return springs. Everyone should always use two throttle return springs for safety, but I have seen some guys use springs that you could lift the truck with! I like the spring inside of a spring that a lot of factory set ups used.
Not too much spring pressure, but will close the throttle blades if something stupid happens... And we all know sh*t happens.... Over and over and over again.....
That's why there is a 'how to' bbs here....

Later folks, Aaron.

When a fool and a wise man argue, Onlookers can't tell the difference...
 
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