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I broke a factory lockout hub on my welded D-30 .I noticed it was loose and missing one bolt. I tightened both hubs but didn`t replace the bolt. Figured I could wait,I was just going to play in the mud. Was the hub weaker because of the missing bolt? Should I buy aftermarket hubs or should I find another factory replacement so I don`t break any thing else? What will give if the hub doesn`t? Thanks for any advice

 
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You've been a victim of the external hubs most common failing. The bolts loosen up, and the hub breaks. It's possible that most of the damage was done before you noticed the loose bolts. Then when you hit the mud, the already damaged hub decided to retire early. A good set of six bolt hubs fastened with studs and nuts and coated with Loctite is a pretty good way to keep the hubs tight. If you have five bolt hubs you can do the same thing. Five bolt hubs are a little weaker. Converting from five bolt to six bolt requires changing the hub & rotor.

Concerning breakage, steering u-joints are probably the next weak link.


"My other car is a BULLDOZER"
 
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if you are going to go that far, why not go with a warn hub conversion and eliminate the bolt on hubs completely? i think this is a much better way to go, and is not that expensive considering what you get. and the warrantee is always a good thing.

dan

/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.giflet it snow/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif
 
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One advantage you might want to consider of the factory hubs is their weakness. With big tires and lockers (or Lincoln locker like you have) the easiest part to replace is the hub. When I went with bigger tires and lockers the next upgrade was going to be hubs, then I thought about it. A broken hub is a few minute fix, a broken axle or diff is a pita, especially while wheeling. A bonus is used stock hubs are ususally cheap because people "upgrade". Carry a hub or two with you. Otherwise, like another post said, your best option if you want to spend some bucks is going to the Ford style via the Warn conversion.

Brad (from the 4 Wheeling center of the universe, 4 corners USA)
 

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/wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif Hmmmm..... Brad, you got a good point there. In machinery systems we call that a "shear pin"....an easily replaceable component that protects the rest much as a fuse does to an electrical wiring circuit. The only guy I knew growing up that had a Jeep drove an early fifties civilian model, and when he went wheeling(hunting usually) and he got it where it couldn't handle the stress, it would kill the engine. Then it was just a matter of the right amount of cussing and restarting the tiny four-banger. Later, he decided to drop in a Chevy 265 sb V8 out of a '56 Chevy; after that, every time he got it in a too-tight place he BROKE SOMETHING IMPORTANT. It was a darn good lesson to me about what NOT to do. Later on he was climbing straight up a hillside with four people in the Jeep at full throttle and blew a front driveline....the Jeep turned immediately sideways and rolled an uncountable number of times downhill, killing one and seriously injuring two. The remaining guy walked fifteen miles for help. Another unforgetable lesson./wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif

CJDave
I never believe any statistics unless I've made 'em up myself.
 
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warn is now producing hublocks that are designed for that exact purpose, they are designed to fail at slightly less torque than the ujoint in a straight line position. they can also be rebuilt as they are using the sliding gear in them as the weak link. not sure if they have this for stock hubs, but i know they do for their conversions.
more food for thought......

dan

/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.giflet it snow/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif
 
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