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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hope that none of our more experienced mechanics grow tired of my continual posts...I always try to scour the board with a search for similiar topics before I go reposting the same old question...but here is a new one.

When I am loaded in the Mack (80,000#s), brakes adjusted tight, and I slam on the brakes hard because some little four-wheeler cuts me off, it will not lock up the tires, unless you're on a very slick surface.

When I am driving my jeep or my pickup, if you slam the brakes on all the way hard, both will easily lock up the brakes.
Maximum braking efficiency in these comes from threshold braking...braking as hard as possible without locking up the brakes (in normal circumstances w/o ABS). Assuming for a moment that brake fade is not a problem, what good would upgrading to bigger brakes do? If the current brakes have way more braking capacity than is neccesary to lock up the wheels, or to slow them at the most efficient level (if the braking ability is limited by the tire's grip on the road and not by the ability of the brake surface to slow the tire), it seems to me that the only advantage of bigger brakes is reduced heat build-up in repeated usage of brakes and slower brake pad wear as a function of the greater brake surface area. Now, if I throw a few tons of seed in the back of the pickup and slam on the brakes (not that I would ever do this) and the brakes don't have enough gusto to slow the truck down fast (or enough gusto to lock up the wheels), I can see why one would want bigger brakes. Going back to the semi-truck, when it's empty, it has way too much brakes for the weight/surface area of tires ratio...push with any seriousness, and you can flat spot 18 tires at a time (looks impressive and expensive...in reality it's just expensive). It seems to me that adding bigger brakes to something that already has enough braking ability to do the job is just making problems...now I realize that there are a lot of differences between air and hydraulic brakes, so don't say I'm barking up the wrong cornstalk because of that...it's in the concept here. I'm thinking that braking effort would be measured in torque...if the braking torque is more force than the wheel can transmit to the ground, the extra force is just wasted...right??? What am I missing in my logic?

Measure once, cut twice...or is that the other way around?
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Your logic sounds perfect to me.....Actually, I've been studying brakes for a while now, all aspects of them...and I'm working on a new braking system--Brakes that never wear out. Dont laugh. as of now, the prototype looks as though it will work. More later.

-Mike

1998 Dodge Ram 1500 Quad Cab 4x4 Laramie SLT Sport Plus--5.9L 360, auto, 3.92s, antispin, BFG A/Ts.
 
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