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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My brake system has the proportioning valve (attached to the frame). The manual says to use a special Jeep tool to open it when bleeding the brakes, but mechanics I've talked to say to ignore it. Anyone have experience with this?

 

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I have heard the same thing. It depends on the year but on one type there is a nipple on the forward end (I think) that needs to be held in and some years it needs to be held out. My '77 CJ-7 needs to be held in while bleeding the brakes. I just used a large C-clamp, you may also be able to use a block of wood wedged against the valve. Some people have told me that they didn't bother with it and had no probs bleeding their brakes. I used the C-clamp thing and it worked out fine. I am not sure if it would make a difference if I didn't. I know this is confusing but I had a late night in the French Quarter in New Orleans and am not thinking all that straight. But hopefully it'll make some sense when you check your out. HTH.
Regards,
rich
[email protected]

fratt
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
also since we dont read instructions,least very often,i happened to once and with the double GM master cyl.it specified raising rear
of vehicle till top of master cyl was level before bleeding,reason being that air gets trapped in the front of the master because of way it
sits nose up.Thats what the instructions said anyway.I also one year ago flushed system and put in 2 new rear wheel cylinders,about
a week ago i was putting on new rear brakes,both of those "new" cylinders were leaking..They came from Advance Auto Parts.Now thats quality


 

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Help me out with this here............

Why would a proportioning valve inhibit brake bleeding?......other than a load compensating one (you know one of those that attaches to the axle and has a lever that senses the riding height of the rear - hence the load). With those you must "simulate" load by detaching the spring or lever to allow the fluid to reach the rear brakes. What I mean is .......you put your foot on the brake to stop and it reaches the threshold of the proportioning/metering valve ......why should bleeding be any different?
Just curious ......this is a first for me.

GeeAea

 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The proportioning valve directs pressure to the front brakes first. At a set point determined
by the back pressure from the front brakes the valve opens a port to allow pressure to the rear brakes.
There is more back pressure from the front brakes when the vehicle is moving than when static, so
while bleeding you won't get full flow to the rear. Moving the pin in or out depending on the valve model,
opens a by-pass to allow equal flow through out the system.


 

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I'm well versed on metering valves and proportioning valves......they've been in most cars since dual master cylinders were put in production cars.........the only time that I've EVER had to do anything "special" with them is either when it was a "load compensating" valve ...........or if one of the fluid circuits had a failure and the light came on in the dash..........I seem to remember.....I think it was AMC....that when one system failed.....a plunger inside the valve biased itself to turn on the light on the dash.......after it happened .....the thing was servicable only by replacement.......there was no way to "re-seat" the plunger.
I'll buy the stuff about the pin thing......but the caliper doesn't know if I'm going 95mph or at a stand still.......if I'm put X amount of pressure on the pedal..........there is X amount of pressure on the caliper.........so if I'm standing on the brake pedal (beyond a certain pressure) the proportioning valve shouldn't even come into the picture to inhibit the flow to the rear brakes. Maybe it's a "workers comp" feature so that petite 100lb. female (or male for that matter) mechanics don't develop vericous veins by straining to put enough pressure on the brake pedals.
GeeAea

 

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Forget the valve. I've replaced the master cylinder and every part except one caliper in the front. Then I switched to D44 axles and did it all again. You don't need to do anything with it, just bleed as usual. If you mess with it and it breaks, it's big $$$.

JEEPN
'97 TJ Sport
'81 CJ-8 Scrambled!
'71 Commando SC-1
'51 CJ-3A
'47 CJ-2A
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ditto what JEEPN said. I've had both my axles apart in the past month or so, just bled at the individual brakes as usual, no problem.

Brad (from the 4 Wheeling center of the universe, 4 corners USA)
 

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a vacuum bleeder makes it much nicer to bleed them too.

79/CJ-7/AMC360/TH400/Q-TRAC/d30/d44/33's/Herculiner
 

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When I rebuilt my Jeep (' 84 CJ7) last winter, I replaced all the brake lines and the master cylinder. When the Jeep was back together I just bled the brakes as usual starting with the shortest run (from the master cyl) and didn't have to do anything with the proportioning valve.

Loose nut behind the wheel
Another right-wing conservative.....
Born and raised in Jeep-Town
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well just so you know.......You should ALWAYS start at the FARTHEST point from the master and work your way to the shortest.....Just an FYI...Mark
66 CJ-5
225 "Dauntless" V-6
33x12.50 15 Goodyear Wrangler MT's
2.5" susp. lift
1.5" shackle
......still looking for more......

 

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The special tool is designed to be inserted in place of the porportoning valve's switch. It holds the internal piston by the indent in the piston where the switche's plunger pin usually rests.
The piston will move to activate the switch by pushing the switche's pin up and closing the curcuit to ground and illuminating your brake warning lamp in the spedo cluster. This lamp will also light when the emergency brake is pressed down and it's switch grounds this same circuit. The lamp carries a positive current so either switch will light the lamp in the spedo cluster.
The porportinging valves piston only moves during a brake line failure during which there is a great dis-porportion between the pressures of the front and rear lines.
I have been told that when bleeding your lines (starting from the rear) it is a good idea to occasionally bleed the fronts during the process so that there will not be too much pressure applied from the rear lines that might move the portortioning valve's piston. That is the the insurance the tool gives in this case.
I have also been told that using a vaccume pump to blead your lines eliminates the danger of the piston in the porporioning valve from moving.
Van at
Vanco Power Brake Supply
9738 Atlantic Avenue South Gate, CA 90280
(323) 563 1588 [email protected]
Can remaunufacture your bad porportioning valve for $ 75.00
This saves a LOT over buying a new one.
Usually a 15 year old valve can use a rebuild anyway as there are quite a few seals in them to deteriorate.
Good insurance due to the importance of your brake system and to your own safety.

JAF
http://www.monsterslayer.com/jeep
 

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Just curious, but has anyone removed the proportioning valve from the jeep completely? What would result? Mine is still attached but with their expense, are they really needed? question

JEEPN
'97 TJ Sport
'81 CJ-8 Scrambled!
'71 Commando SC-1
'51 CJ-3A
'47 CJ-2A
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Mopar performance makes a real nice adjustable proportioning valve (available from Summit among others) that I think only costs around $75.00 new. Adjustability is probably a really good idea anyway for a modified vehicle(lift etc.). You'll lose the light for malfunction alert but the light doesn't tell you of a malfunction until it occurs at which point you'd be busy pumping the pedal and downshifting and swearing and praying and wouldnt need a light to tell you about the problem.

jay2jeeps
bad politicians are elected by good poeple who don't vote

 
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