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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, this is going to sound like a ridiculous question, but can you tell me what I'm doing wrong?

I am in the process of bleeding the brakes on my Jeep. I'm following the instructions in the Chilton manual to a T but I'm still not getting the results I am looking for.

Starting with the right rear wheel, I have a slightly filled jar of fluid with a clear hose coming from the bleeder screw submerged into the fluid.

I open the bleeder screw and have someone pump the pedal. I am waiting for no bubbles to appear in the fluid.

I get the rear done ok, but when I do the front brakes the brake fluid is foamy which seems like there is constant air in the lines?!

What am I doing wrong? /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif

Thanks,
Sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Well, I think I may have figured out my problem... I was having a person pump the pedal and when they released the pedal with the bleeder valve open, it sucked air back into the system. I'm an idiot.


Sean
 

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Usually what I do is have a person pump the pedal until there is good pressure then...open the bleeder while the other person is still applying pressure. Once the pedal has hit the floor close the bleeder while the pumper is holding the pedal down.
and repeat until all air is out remember to start at the wheel futhest from the master cylinder.
John
 

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You can get Speed Bleeders from NAPA. They replace the bleeder valves and have will not let air in. Kind of a one way valve.
Keith
 

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NEVER PUMP THE PEDAL! Pumping turns the big bubbles into foam, then it's real hard to get out.

Just have someone push the pedal down and hold it while you open the bleeder. It may seem like it's not doing much the first few pumps, but it is. It gets the air out first.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
NEVER PUMP THE PEDAL! Pumping turns the big bubbles into foam, then it's real hard to get out.

Just have someone push the pedal down and hold it while you open the bleeder. It may seem like it's not doing much the first few pumps, but it is. It gets the air out first.

[/ QUOTE ]

That is true... but if you take your time and have things just so... pumping the pedal with the system closed will move the fluid (and air) toward the bleeders. You just don't want to open up a bleeder right after you do that. Take a smoke break.

It is much like working with drywall... Well no.... I just hate working with drywall and bleeding brakes is only slightly better (because is does end).

Jeep brakes are easy compared to most when it comes to bleeding.

/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/40BEER.gif
Dale
 

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I have a vacume I hook up to the compressor, takes longer to clean off and open the bleeders than to actualy bleed the brakes.
 

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I always just barely crack the bleeders, let them drip while I,m watching TV and just keep topping off. It takes an afternoon but it replaces all the fluid inthe lines with clean.
 

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Before I bought a MityVac vacuum pump bleeding brakes was a manual job, done with two people. I'd have one of my kids hop in the driver seat and press the brake pedal. I'd then crack open the bleeder and the pedal would go down as the pressure was bled off. They were instructed to hold the pedal and not let up up till I told them to do so. If the pedal was released with the bleeder open, air would be sucked back up into the brake line. Then I'd close the bleeder and they'd let up the pedal.

The process was repeated until air was out of the lines. It did not take long this way. You do have to keep an eye on the amount of fluid in the Master Cylinder to avoid sucking air into the lines if there's a lot of fluid volume being bled.
 

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I've had good luck just gravity bleeding the brakes. Open the bleeders, let them drain, keeping the system full. Doesn't get much easier than that.

I was taught the, "pump up, hold, open bleeder" technique. It works fine, but you have to have a person that is a little in tune with you. Other wise it can be a little aggrivating.

My brothers seem to prefer to open the bleeder, then one push on the pedal, held at the floor. Re-tighten bleeder, then release pedal. Repeat process.

I think they all work, as long as you are consistant. And we've always tried a different method when things just didn't seem "right".

Just realize that the brake system will draw air into the system on any UPWARD travel of the pedal. If the system is closed, it can only draw fluid from the master cylinder.
 

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I use the hand vacuum pump for brakes. It works good.
 

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at work.
usually gravity bleed till fluid comes out while im picking tools up and getting my pan and a hose that i use over the bllder. by this time fluid is usually coming out. then havea s econd person to the pump, open bleeder, close bleeder, release.... usually about 3-4 times per wheel and it is good.
 

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The method I use is to open the bleeder and hold my thumb on it while an assistant pumps the pedal. I can feel the bubbles as they are pushed out. After a couple pumps with no bubbles I close the bleeder and move on. It's messy but fast.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
The method I use is to open the bleeder and hold my thumb on it while an assistant pumps the pedal. I can feel the bubbles as they are pushed out. After a couple pumps with no bubbles I close the bleeder and move on. It's messy but fast.

[/ QUOTE ]

You do have a rag or something to catch the big burps?

It's messy no matter what you do after you open a line and have someone's foot on the pedal but I would have to agree it's the fastest way.

Using a MightyVac is pretty effective after some gravity bleeding if you are on your own. And works great when even a heavy foot won't get those last few pesky air bubbles. Actually a heavy foot can be a problem too - the air will break into smaller bubbles that are harder to get out.

Stock CJs with drum brakes on the rear are very easy. Convert to rear disk and it gets a little harder. Some of the new fangled junk that the brake lines zig zag up and down control arms and things - do what you can and then use a MightyVac.

/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/40BEER.gif
Dale
 

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[ QUOTE ]
Before I bought a MityVac vacuum pump bleeding brakes was a manual job, done with two people. I'd have one of my kids hop in the driver seat and press the brake pedal. I'd then crack open the bleeder and the pedal would go down as the pressure was bled off. They were instructed to hold the pedal and not let up up till I told them to do so. If the pedal was released with the bleeder open, air would be sucked back up into the brake line. Then I'd close the bleeder and they'd let up the pedal.

The process was repeated until air was out of the lines. It did not take long this way. You do have to keep an eye on the amount of fluid in the Master Cylinder to avoid sucking air into the lines if there's a lot of fluid volume being bled.

[/ QUOTE ]

I'm with LEVE... get yourself a kid or two (two or more works best 'cuz then they'll compete w/ one another to do the job - thus 'motivated' workers, as well as who does the best job). Unfortunately, you cannot (legally) pick-up a kid at the local Harbor Freight (for cheap), and Advance Auto doesn't have any $20 deposit loaners either. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/tongue.gif But they do work awful good - my best two are my 3 & 5 yr olds. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/applause.gif Wouldn't trade 'em for the world.
 
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