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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought my CJ about 7 years ago. One of the first mods was new tires, 35" BFG Mud. This jeep has been an on going project since then, for the past 18 months I haven't really been able to work on it and the Jeep has basically sat in the driveway b/c my job takes up all my time. I've made a point to move it forward and back about once every week or two so that the tires don't sit in the same spot all the time.

Yesterday I noticed small cracks all along the sidewalls. Is the this the start of dry rot? is it safe to drive on these tires or can I have a blow out?

 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
My jeep sat for a long time too, in a garage but it still sat. I towed it on a car dolly 1000 miles from Illinois to Vermont. It never moved in storage. The tires suffered the same fate yours did, they started to dry rot...I dont believe this is safe. Although maybe the cracks are just on the surface??
I, however have been running them anyway for 2 seasons. Not proud of it mind you as I think it is unsafe.... I would love to run out and buy 4 new tires, but my fiance thinks saving for a house is a better idea....in the long run I aggree with her.... I guess... /wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif /wwwthreads_images/icons/tongue.gif

Red 7 in the Green Mountain State
84 CJ7 / 258 / weber

torx: the root of all evil.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So, does anyone have a solution? I have heard of Armor All to protect from the elements... I didn't do it, cause I hate shining a vehicle... are there any maintenance rule one should apply to prolong the life of tires, especially on a vehicle that is parked for long periods of time???

A Jeep is a Jeep..
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well... I armorall my tires, the shine lasts all of ten minutes or so....if at all...

Red 7 in the Green Mountain State
84 CJ7 / 258 / weber

torx: the root of all evil.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I caught this info from the net... "Do not put Armorall on tires, it contains alcohols which will cause cracking. Look for something like UV-40 if yo have to use something likethis."

This here is from the Dunlop tire site.. "Dunlop does not recommend use of any cleaning agents, besides soap and water. Many cleaning agents contain petroleum base product which may contaminate rubber surfaces resulting in tire cracking, etc.
Use a mild soap solution to clean sidewalls, white striping or lettering and rinse off with plain water. We instruct our service personnel and customers never to apply any other material to enhance sidewall appearanceand these may degrade rubber and remove inherent ozone resistance."

This one is from TireCradle, don't mind the advertisement, the info is ok... "It's a fact that when a vehicle sits for long periods the tires will be subjected to flatspotting. The reasons that tires flatspot are basically a function of pressure, temperature and time. Cold setting tires can be either temporary in that the tire will round out during driving, or permanent. If permanent, this effects the belting and casing of the tire. Flatspotting and the associated problems can be prevented by using TireCradles. TireCradles will prevent flatspotting damage to expensive performance tires. TireCradles are easy to use. Simply park on them and forget it; the tires will not be subject to flatspotting. Keep in mind that parking a hot, soft performance tire on a cool concrete or asphalt surface (cool is relative to the tire), accelerates this process. Performance tires are designed to operate in a wide variety of temperatures. While the rubber compounds used offer the best performance at these temperatures, they also accelerate the problem of flatspotting. What makes your tires work, also subjects them to cold setting. That contact patch between the hot soft tire and the cool road causes flatspotting. How much have you spent on your performance tires? If you're like many enthusiasts, you have easily a thousand dollars or more tied up in them. Flat spotted tires can fail at SPEED. This can result in severe damage to the car's suspension as well as damage to the car itself if a collision results due to the flat spotted tires failing. Keep in mind that flat spotted tires can also cause problems with the casing of the tire. Cracking can result. Obviously, the solution is to avoid leaving the car sitting for long periods of time. Very often, this is easier said than done. The winter, bad weather,an illness or any number of other things can result in the vehicle sitting for weeks or months at a time. Cold setting tires will be the result of that inactivity."




A Jeep is a Jeep..
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This is the Hors d'oeuvre...

"Tires, rubber and vinyl care by Larry Reynolds at CarCareOnline.com

There are two main degrading agents that attack tires and rubber trim. They are UV light waves and ozone. Both of these attack the long hydrocarbon chains of the rubber and by breaking these bonds, shorten the molecules with resulting loss of elasticity and other problems. Tire manufacturers add two primary sacrificial protectants to the rubber. To protect against UV, they add carbon black. This is why tires don't come in designer colors to match your paint. The carbon black will turn white/gray as it absorbs the UV and dissipates the energy as heat. Thus the basis of rubber parts turning gray as they age. To protect against ozone, tire manufacturers add a wax based sacrificial protectant. The ozone attacks the wax and depletes it. As the tire rolls, additional wax is forced to the surface of the tire. This is referred to as "blooming". This blooming refreshes the surface wax protectant. A tire that has not been flexed will have the wax depleted by the ozone and thus begin to degrade and suffer "dry rot". The raw silicone oil that is the main ingredient in most of the nationally advertised over the counter products may actually dissolve the wax and be the cause of premature tire sidewall cracking/failure. The quality tire/rubber dressings should contain a strong UV protectant to bolster the efforts of the carbon black and not contain any raw silicone oil. Many of the nationally advertised rubber and vinyl products also contain formaldehyde. If you plan on having a funeral for your dash, then you may wish to use one of these products.

My personal favorite tire and exterior rubber/vinyl trim protectant is Black Again. It is, in my opinion, the best non-silicone oil based product to restore the jet-black patina to tires and exterior rubber/vinyl. A white creamy polymer emulsion, with a heavy duty UV protectant, it works equally well on all colors of exterior trim. (They tried calling it Any Color Again, but the name didn't work). If raw silicone oil based products have been previously applied to the rubber/vinyl, the raw silicone oil had saturated the material. Black Again will help dissolve out the silicone oil (this is good), but does not seem to be able to do so evenly (this is bad). The finish may be slightly "splotchy" the first couple of applications of Black Again. The only solution is to apply several coats about a week apart, and the finish will eventually even out. An excellent spray on type of protectant for tires and rubber trim is One Grand Exterior Rubber Treatment. Spray on, allow to penetrate and buff off the excess, leaving a medium gloss, non-greasy finish. Harly Tire Nu is another spay on product with a high gloss finish. Meguiar #40 is a vinyl and rubber cleaner and conditioner. I feel it works better on vinyl than it does on rubber. Leaves a medium gloss finish. Sonax Trim Protectant cleans and protects exterior vinyl and rubber, producing a high gloss finish. Zymol Tyre is a new product that leaves a medium gloss and helps restore some of the black patina to rubber. Wurth Rubber Care, Sonax Rubber Care and Zymol Seal are designed for the "live" rubber door gaskets. These products are rich in glycerin and help maintain the flexibility and sealing ability of the gaskets. A nice side benefit is that they help keep doors from freezing in winter."

A Jeep is a Jeep..
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you have to put your project on the back burner,jack it off the tires and block it up & wrap the tires in lawn&leaf bags to protect them from the weather. Cheap and easy way to protect your tires.

Dave Cardwell
 

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some pretty big replies there Frank you must be an engineer/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif

the simple answer is...
I would not trust the tires going 70mph for hours at end BUT for wheelin they should be OK... you do have a spare, RIGHT!!!

and for how to stop it from happing again, either cover the entire jeep or get tire covers , like they use on RV's that sit for a while in the sun....

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From Once-ler Industrys
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