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Get an older one. Don't look at this new stuff. Go for one in the late 80's to early 90's. You can get a heck of a deal on them. Plus (in my opinion) the older squared off body style is far better...

The 4x4 equipment on a vehicle will subtract only a negligable amount from your gas mileage. Not very much extra weight, etc...

Have him talk to us... Even if it's just for snow and on-road use, 4x4 is far better. Stucks suck, so if you're listening "dad" let this guy get something that isn't likely to get stuck. 4x.

The ones with the 4.3L are very reliable. Plus these are plentiful in parts yards, meaning that rather than buying things from expensive parts stores, you can go to a "junk" yard and grab parts for very little money, slap it in, and be on your way again, without spending ludicrous amounts of money for newer stuff.

Tim "Sandman"

ORC Land Use columnist:
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Why around 70,000??? These things last a lot longer with that if you can find one that's been decently maintained. And as I was saying earlier if something does go out, go to a parts yard around you and just grab some replacements. It's cheap.

The other reason for thinking of an older one is insurance. Not as high as it would be for something in the late 90's..

Just because it's got slightly higher miles on it doesn't make it unreliable... I'm amazed at how many people run out and buy newer cars used thinking it'll some how be better than a better deal on an older one. Let's go through a hypothetical situation, shall we?

Newer truck. Spend $7,000. Have higher insurance rates. Plus if it's not been maintained the greatest, you have high repair bills to tack onto that.

Older one (late 80's). These can be had for as little as $2000-$3000 still in fine mechanical shape. For that price you'll likely end up with one that has 4x4. With the older one you have lower insurance rates, plus if something breaks you'll still be into the vehicle for less money since parts are cheaper and they're easier to diagnose problems on than the newer ones. And the late 80's still had the 4.3L (but check it out closely, since they also had the 2.8L which is slightly less desirable) and fuel injection and got pretty good gas mileage (as long as you kept your foot on the throttle lightly, which is what's needed to get decent gas mileage in all but honda civics and toyota camrys).

With the pros and cons listed out, I still can't understand how you are choosing to get a newer one... Oh well, not my decision, and that being said, this is likely my last reply to this thread... /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif

Tim "Sandman"

ORC Land Use columnist:
My May Column
 

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I have seen a few (4x) in the past for that price. But I mixed two arguments into one. Comparing 2wd to 2wd now. I have seen innumerable 2wd S trucks in that price range with decent body and decent components. Which would still put one as being better off financially than spending perhaps even double or triple the money... /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif I'm not trying to rattle anyone, nor am I trying to intimidate anyone or any such thing. Best time to buy a truck by the way (4x at least) is in the Spring, when people are unloading trucks they bought in Fall for winter. This assumes you're in the snow belt. I'm unsure of when the best season to buy a truck is elsewhere. /wwwthreads_images/icons/crazy.gif

Tim "Sandman"

ORC Land Use columnist:
My May Column
 
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