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post #1 of (permalink) Old 06-05-2003, 09:29 AM Thread Starter
 
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cam lobe wear

A search turned up only valve wear so here's my sit-u-a-shun, doing a motor swap with stock 1.3L motors (bad crank is the reason) the replacement motor has about 60,000 miles which is half of the original but shows wear on the #4 exhaust lobe. When I say wear it has a ridge on the outside edge of the lobe that is visible & felt with your finger nail. The profile looks OK and it is worn on the leading side of the lobe which to me seems like the clearence was set too tight and oil changes were few & far between! The cam in the motor being pulled out is good so do you guys think I should drop in the new motor and see how it runs or swap out the cams once I pull out the original motor and have both engines on the workbench. Seems to me that it's a lot easier to install a cam with the motor out of the truck. If I am correct you have to pull the head with the engine installed to swap a cam right? On another subject how have you fixed a stripped bolt hole for the 6mm bolt that holds the water pump outlet tube to the engine block? I've already had to retap a bunch of the oil pan bolt holes ot to7mm x 1.0 how much meat is behind that bolt boss before I drill into the water jacket? Thanks guys.
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 06-05-2003, 10:18 PM
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Re: cam lobe wear

If that cam lobe is worn like that , I'd swap out that cam . You can get regrinds for lower torque bands pretty cheap , be a good time to upgrade it . Yes, the cam has to come out from the rear of the head . Check the bearing surfaces of the journals , they have to be very smooth and no wear inside the head since there is no real bearing , the head has no real tolerance for wear either . If oil changes were that far apart , you may want to consider rebuilding the head you have and use it instead . When you do re-install that cam , stake those locking screws that go into the rocker shafts real well , they have a habit of backing themselves out and losing oil pressure . All of those 6mm bolts can be easily helicoiled , I just get a kit with a large refill of coils and do any that are worn when I go through a block . Cheap enough and keeps all the original bolt sizes correct , makes it a lot easier to work on later .
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 06-06-2003, 07:32 AM Thread Starter
 
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Re: cam lobe wear

Thanks Sarge I'll track down a heli coil kit and I have already picked up some 6mm socket head screws to replace those phillips head POS in the rocker shaft mounts. Do you think that swapping cams between heads is a problem due to unique wear patterns of each cam & head ? I keep thinking about this as opposed to buying a new cam since I don't know if the engine I'm installing is going to hold up or not - never heard it run before I bought it.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 06-06-2003, 11:09 PM
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Re: cam lobe wear

Best thing to do is to pull the cam out of one of the heads and give it a really thorough inspection . Look at the bearing surfaces in the head and check for any gouging or scoring . If the one engine lost it's crank , there is a good chance some of the garbage got into the oil gallies in the head as well . Look for excessive wear on the rockers , and especially the adjuster tips , you can mix and match a good set together but be aware the intake and exhaust shafts and their respective rockers are a different diameter . Get a factory service manual , it's absolutely the best investment you'll ever make for a Zuk .
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 06-07-2003, 10:09 AM Thread Starter
 
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Re: cam lobe wear

I think I will swap the cams between the 2 heads I've got and hope for the best. I should have been more specific about the crank going bad. What happened is the crankshaft keyway for the timing gear elongated & tore up the woodruff key also thus my crank is bad, not that I spun a bearing or rod. However I did find small metal fragments in the oilpan of the new motor which appear to have come from the worn cam lobe or some part of the valve train. Flushed the engine with mineral spirits and cleaned it out while on the stand. On the FSM deal what about the disc version do many folks use it? Is it easy to read & navigate thru? I've got a laptop I can drag to the garage and run it on. Went and picked up a SS spring style thread repair kit looks the ticket thanks again to ya Sarge.
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