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post #1 of (permalink) Old 09-27-2002, 12:59 PM Thread Starter
 
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You think you know S.H.I.T. ?

Ever wonder where the word "$hit" comes from?
.....well here it is....
Certain types of manure used to be transported (as everything was back then) by ship.... Well, in dry form it weights a lot less, but once water hits it; it not only becomes heavier, but the process of fermentation begins again.
One by product of this fermentation is methane gas and as the stuff was stored in bundles below decks on leaky wood ships, you can see what could (and did) happen; methane began to build up below decks and the first time someone came below at night with a lantern ... BOOOOM!
Several ships were destroyed in this manner before it was discovered what was happening. After that, the bundles of manure were always stamped with the term S.H.I.T which meant to Ship High In Transit. In other words, high enough off the lower decks so that any water that came into the hold would not touch this volatile cargo and start the production of methane.

Bet you didn't know that one!!!!!
[img]images/graemlins/laugh.gif[/img]
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 09-27-2002, 01:05 PM
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Re: You think you know S.H.I.T. ?

Its funny you say this..... my father just told me that story last week. Its a good bit of trivia
post #3 of (permalink) Old 09-27-2002, 01:42 PM
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Re: You think you know S.H.I.T. ?

wow scooby, that's the most interesting thing i've heard in a long time [img]images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img] the dictionary doesnt mention it being an acronym, but it does say that it dates to circa 1720, which would be about right. neato, now i get to go impress my friends [img]images/graemlins/wink.gif[/img]
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 09-27-2002, 06:19 PM
 
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Re: You think you know S.H.I.T. ?

Hey Scooby
That is pretty cool, didn't know that one....but won't forget either..he he he.
So what does the other four letter word mean?
I've always thought it meant Further Understanding of Carnal Knowedge......
Any takers on that one?
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 09-27-2002, 07:38 PM
 
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Re: You think you know S.H.I.T. ?

I downloaded something awhile back that is all about that word. It says that it's the most versitle word in the english language. It is about the only word that can make up almost an entire sentence and still make sense. (F [bleep] the [bleep] ing [bleep] ers). It supposedly origionated from a german word that sounds like freakin, but it's spelled differently - it means to strike. I have no idea how it came to represent the various things that it does. I'm pretty sure I downloaded it from a link on this board, but I can't find the post. I wish I could remember the way it went. If interested, I'll post it in text here tomorrow.
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 09-28-2002, 01:32 AM
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Re: You think you know S.H.I.T. ?

For Unlawfull Carnal Knowledge. That wa a Van Halen album title too.
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 09-28-2002, 10:45 AM
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\"The usage of F#(K\"

That's a Monty Python bit, but it's just comedy - not history. You can find it on KaZaa or probably any of the other music exchanges. I'm more inclined to believe that it comes from old British arrest reports - Reason for arrest: For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge, nowadays "pandering to prostitution". But I don't know that that's true either.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 09-28-2002, 09:21 PM
 
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Re: \"The usage of F#(K\"

<font color="red"> </font color> Mmmmmmmm OK. <font color="green"> </font color> I didn't figure it was too true, but that's the best idea I've heard until the one you listed. <font color="orange"> </font color> It was still funny though. [img]images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img]
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 09-28-2002, 09:44 PM
 
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Re: \"The usage of F#(K\"

heres something someone posted on ORC a while ago about this..i thinks its more historicaly acurate too [img]images/graemlins/wink.gif[/img] [img]images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

THE FINGER;
Isn't history more fun when you know
something about it?

Giving the Finger Before the Battle of Agincourt in
1415, the
French,anticipating victory over the English, proposed
to cut off the
middle
finger of all captured English soldiers. Without the
middle finger it
would
be impossible to draw the renowned English longbow and
therefore be
incapable
of fighting in the future. This famous weapon was
made of the native
English
Yew tree, and the act of drawing the longbow was known
as "plucking the
yew"
(or "pluck yew"). Much to the bewilderment of the
French, the English
won a
major upset and began mocking the French by waving
their middle fingers
at
the defeated French, saying, "See, we can still pluck
yew! "PLUCK
YEW!"
Since 'pluck yew' is rather difficult to say, the
difficult consonant
cluster
at the beginning has gradually changed to a labiodent
a ricative 'F',
and
thus the words often used in conjunction with the
one-finger-salute are
mistakenly thought to have something to do with an
intimate encounter.
It is
also because of the pheasant feathers on the arrows
used w/ the longbow
that
the symbolic gesture is known as "giving the bird".
And yew thought
yew knew
everything.
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 09-30-2002, 12:58 PM
 
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Re: \"The usage of F#(K\"

<font face="Times New Roman">
<font color="green"> Way does it not surprise me that "The Finger" was originally developed to be directed at the French? [img]images/graemlins/smirk.gif[/img] </font color>
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