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post #1 of (permalink) Old 09-16-2000, 12:49 PM Thread Starter
 
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What about the dog?

Hey all, I got a question. What's the best way to strap the dog in the jeep? I'm running a difficult trail tommorrow (Sunday), Holy Cross, near Vail CO. It will be the hardest trail by far I've attemted. I'm thinking a harness, with a carabiner on the leash loop, attached to the chest belt in the passenger seat. Or should I just leave her free in the back? Hmmm, maybe the dog should stay home. Thoughts?

Max

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post #2 of (permalink) Old 09-16-2000, 01:38 PM
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Re: What about the dog?

Okay dog harnessing for the Jeep, I found, is unique from other vehicles. I tried the harness that the shoulder belt loops through, and my poor mutts were constantly getting tangled in the damn thing. You see, trail riding is different from going over the highway to the park.

So, I got a short strap of nylon web (length determined by height of your dog) and sewed a loop in one end just like a leash handle and sewed a leash hook in the other end. Just a VERY short leash basically. BUT I made the length such that when you loop the leash around the bottom crossbar of the seat frame and pass the hook through and handle loop, you can snap onto Rover's collar.

I made the length of this rig specifically so Doggie can stand on the seat without hanging over the side of Jeep. My dogs can now sit, stand and lay down with only one strap to deal with. No getting tangled in the seat belt or complicated harness straps. Yet, he doesn't have enough lead to fall out or jump over the side.

It's really pretty simple. Nothing is more dangerous than having Spot howling, hanging by his neck while you're trying to negotiate an obstacle. If you leave him free, he will bail the second the Jeep feels like it is not as stable as he would like. Consider what will happen if the edge of a 50 foot drop off is just a few feet from his side of the Jeep. Strap him in.

I trail ride with two hyperactive greyhounds and this set up works for me. Csvaugh, from this BBS, saw my set up when we rode together at the Rosser Rendezvous.

post #3 of (permalink) Old 09-16-2000, 03:13 PM Thread Starter
 
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Re: What about the dog?

Hey thanks Traveller, just strapped her in like that with an old, short nylon lead I had; works a lot better than trying to secure her utilizing the seatbelt. We're off in a few more hours, can't wait for tommorrow!

Max

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post #4 of (permalink) Old 09-16-2000, 05:32 PM
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Re: What about the dog?

I use a piece of coated cable attatched to the roll bar at the top in the center with a clip attatched to the other end adjusted to the height of the dog so he can lay down.

post #5 of (permalink) Old 09-16-2000, 08:45 PM
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Re: What about the dog?

I put a loop on the center of my roll bar, and attach the Dalmatian's harness to it with a good leather leash. If he tries to jump out, he just swings back in, It is long enough for him to lay down with, but if I try to hook the Rottie in also, they just get tangled up. I only travel with one of the dogs now, except for the lil' woman!

Last sunday was my first trip up to Holy Cross City. I must admit, it is one of my favorite trails now. The weather was perfect, as it should be tomorrow, and the Aspen trees are just about in their prime. I only had to winch once, just above the creek. I slipped off a large boulder with my worn out tires. There are some nice winch points along the more difficult areas. You need to report in with a summary of your trip!



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post #6 of (permalink) Old 09-16-2000, 09:15 PM
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Re: What about the dog?

I take my dog wheeling with me somtimes and I dont even try to tie him up. Ive been in some real offcamber situations and he has never bailed on me. In fact I think he likes it...he gets a sh!t-eating grin on his face:-) Somtimes after we've been out for awhile he gets restless and I just let him out and hell just follow behind me on the trail. Another reason I dont tie him in is if I were to roll I wouldnt want him to get smashed between the roll cage and the ground. Whereas if he is free he can jump out if need be. My dog is an Irish Setter and he is pretty hyper, if I was to tie him up when he didnt want to be it would not be pretty for either of us. But every dog is different and it depends on the type of dog and his personality as to whether tying him up would work.

JACOB
81 cj5 WITH SOA/SR/302
2000 TJ

TIS BETTER TO HAVE JEEPED AND ROLLED THAN NEVER TO HAVE JEEPED AT ALL...

post #7 of (permalink) Old 09-16-2000, 10:01 PM
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Re: What about the dog?

ok if you strap your dog in your jeep get a harness. also do not run a strap or cable to the top of your roll bar. think about it if you roll over where is the dog going to go? make a strap set up so that the dog is in the back of the jeep and have a strap coming from each side to connect to the harness. this will keep the dog from swinging out one side or the other and will keep it centered in the jeep. again use a harness and not a collar. if you do roll upside down you don't want to hang rover. i know that if you are taking your dog four wheeling then you must love them so take the time to think of how to safely secure them to your jeep. i some times will take one of my weimerainers (they are my baby's!) but i usually don't strap them at all but if i do anything that can get hairy my wife and the dog get out. i do suggest if your dog rides even on the hard obsticles that you do work out a safety harness.

brian wilson
80 cj5 "high 5"
stretched to 100" wb
351w/np435/d300/d44/d60/detroits/4.56/35ss/bdlocks
post #8 of (permalink) Old 09-16-2000, 11:48 PM
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Re: What about the dog?

Y'know, I certainly wouldn't pretend to answer for anybody else's dog, or jeep or anything like that.

Speaking for myself, what I own are cow dogs. These are the kind of dogs farmers use around here to herd cattle mostly, sheep sometimes. They are pretty clearly related to Aussie Sheps or Border Collies, but nobody here bothers with purity of breeding.

They are tougher than whang leather, agile, athletic, loyal and smart as hell.

You see them riding on top of 12 foot high loads of hay bales on 1 ton flat bed trucks, totally unrestrained, at 60 mph. You see them riding on the cross bed tool boxes in the back of pickups at 75 or 80 mph.

I would trust this breed to stay with the jeep through anything short of a rollover. I do not and will not restrain either of my mutts in the rig. I would also regard a rollover as an indication I went farther than I personally should have.

Other dogs, other stories.

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post #9 of (permalink) Old 09-17-2000, 04:25 AM
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Re: What about the dog?

Okay, I have tried the roll bar strategy and wound up driving with a greyhound in my lap every time we tilted to the passenger side. They are not the kind of dogs who like slanted surfaces.

Also, they would be squashed in a rollover.

The problem with harnesses is that they are designed for Rover to quietly sit in his seat while you take him to the park or vet. When spending several hours on the trail, they just have to move around some. With my rig, they can sit, stand and lay down on the seat, they can also get down on the floor. They just can't go out the door and in my lap. Believe me, those boney legs HURT when they decide they need to have some closeness with you.

All the harness straps and seat belts just get them all tangled up and then you have to stop and unwind them.



post #10 of (permalink) Old 09-17-2000, 08:35 AM
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Re: What about the dog?

i was not refering to the harnesses designed to keep a dog in a seat but rather a lead harness. also will your dogs run off if you just put them out of the jeep on the hairy stuff? like i said earlier, i do. i tend to hit trails where there are obstacles that could very well end up in a roll over so yes it is a consideration for me. i just don't want to torcher my dog buy strapping him down and that is why i kick them out on the steep stuff. i guess it is all about personal preferance but also keep the dog in mind.

brian wilson
80 cj5 "high 5"
stretched to 100" wb
351w/np435/d300/d44/d60/detroits/4.56/35ss/bdlocks
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