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post #1 of (permalink) Old 08-20-2000, 06:29 AM
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Swedish Tire Lock System

I seriously want to get bead locks, but I'm a little worried about their road manners with my tires. Now my jeep doesn't spend too much time on the road, just long enough to get me to/from my trails, but that can be up to 4 hours of highway there and back. When I last mounted my 35X15.5 Swamper SXs on my steel 10 inch rims, they were real buggers to even get close to balanced, and from what I hear balancing is even more difficult with bead locks. Combine that with what I've read about bead locks potentially coming apart at speed on the road, and I'm a little worried about them on the street even though I know I need them on the trail (I'm airing down to 5 or 6 psi now, without bead locks, so far no lost beads, but GETTING WORRIED).

So I started to look for some kinda alternative, and ran across these 'swedish bead lock' things. The concept as I understand it is an inner tube which runs inside the tire that has a kevlar belt wrapped around it so that when it is pumped up with air it can only expand laterally against the beads. This forces the beads against the rim, in effect locking them against the rim. The supposed benefits are that you can install them in any rim (just hafta drill 'nuther hole for the inner tubes valve stem), and they provided run flat type service, and you don't need to pump in so much air to air up! Also, this system locks BOTH beads, not just the outside one.

Down side as I can see/guess is that you might have problems getting the valve stem to seal, meaning you might end up with a slow leak in your tire, I've heard of chafing problems causing the inner tube to puncture, and although this might force the bead out, it doesn't prevent the tire from spinning on the rim, although I guess a regular bead lock doesn't do that either, does it?

I am hoping that there are some people on this list who have opinions and most of all experience with this system:

1) Does it have less effect on balancing the tire than a regular bead lock?

2) does it work as well as a regular bead lock for locking the bead?

3) Is it reliable, or is inner tube puncturing going to be a problem?

4) Will it seal properly?

5) Does it make mounting the tire so difficult that my regular tire jockey won't be able to do it?

The system is quite expensive - $800us or so for my size rims - but it might be worth the extra cash if it is safer on the street, locks both beads, allows easier balancing of the tire (than regular bead locks), and makes it easier/faster for me to air up.

Please let me know what you guys think.

Thanks.

Chad



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post #2 of (permalink) Old 08-20-2000, 08:06 AM
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Re: Swedish Tire Lock System

i don't own the tire lock system but i have read about them. the only down side i can see is you can still get sticks, rocks, and dirt/mud pushed up into the bead of your tire. i have had this happen on occasions and have seen it also. i just installed a set of beadlocks on my jeep and this won't happen with them. yesterday and the day before was the first time out with them and i like being able to run 5psi in my tsl's and not have to worry about loosing a bead. i don't run any wheel weights on them but i didn't on my regular rims either. the beadlocks do ride noticably worse but only when you hit certain speeds. i trailer my jeep and would never take a 4 hour trip to get to the trail as you have stated so i prefer the beadlocks. in your case maybe the tire lock system is the thing. if i remember correctly the tire lock is rather expensive so that could be a considerstion. the only other thing i would worry about is when you are aired down and wheeling to where the tire is flexing alot will this cause the tire to rub the tube in a way that would could wear a hole in it. i think if this concern proves to be ok then this might be the system for you.

brian wilson
80 cj5 "high 5"
stretched to 100" wb
351w/np435/d300/d44/d60/detroits/4.56/35ss/bdlocks
post #3 of (permalink) Old 08-20-2000, 08:22 AM
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Re: Swedish Tire Lock System

I was just on the trail yesterday with a friend who has been running a set of thes Tire Locs with 44" tires under a Suburban for about 4 years...




I can tell you they do keep the tire from spinning, and you do not get stuff stuck between the tire and rim since you have pressure from the inside "locking" the tire bead to the rim - no room to push anything in there. He does not have problems with leakage either.
As to price, if you compare the Tire Loc's to any other beadlock for both the inside and outside of the tire you will see that the TireLoc's are actually cheaper.

Yes, if not installed correctly there can be some chafing and rupture of the inner tube... but it is an inner tube - cheap to replace. If installed correctly you should have no problems and they work wonderfully...

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post #4 of (permalink) Old 08-20-2000, 08:24 AM
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Re: Swedish Tire Lock System

cool!

brian wilson
80 cj5 "high 5"
stretched to 100" wb
351w/np435/d300/d44/d60/detroits/4.56/35ss/bdlocks
post #5 of (permalink) Old 08-20-2000, 01:09 PM
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Re: Swedish Tire Lock System

The tire spinning and debris working between the tire and rim should be no more of a problem than the same setup running full inflation on the trail without the Tirelocs.
If you air up the Tirelocs to 30 psi (have no idea what they recommend, but think they can go up to 40 or 50 psi), it's the same pressure against the beads as if you had the entire tire aired up to that psi.
On paper the idea looks very good. I really can't see what makes them cost so much, however. It's only an inner tube and an internal kevlar tire.

QUESTION: When you air up the regular tire, how does the air get past the internal tube/kevlar/tire combo and into the street tire? Some kind of an internal extended valve stim that extends past the Tireloc and into the street tire??

Doug '97 TJ
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 08-20-2000, 08:58 PM
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Re: Swedish Tire Lock System

Sounds good - what can you or your friend tell me regarding balancing/out of round problems? These two, together with air leaks, are the main complaints with regular bead locks as far as I know.

post #7 of (permalink) Old 08-21-2000, 10:21 AM
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Re: Swedish Tire Lock System

One of the top-trail competition guys here in Norway uses glue ... more spesific "window seleant glue".
He has 35 (or 38 ??) Boggers on a small, light rockcrawler.
He regulary airs down to 3-5 lb's...

Only time he had a problem was when the paint stripped from the wheel ....

Regards,
PerJ (From Norway)

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post #8 of (permalink) Old 08-21-2000, 11:08 AM
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Re: Swedish Tire Lock System

Contact me via email or private message and I will be glad to defer your questions to the owner/user of the TireLoc system - he can help you better than I [img]/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

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post #9 of (permalink) Old 08-21-2000, 12:07 PM
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Re: Swedish Tire Lock System

I use the tire loks and they work great. You have to drill another hole in the rim for a second valve stem. The instructions suggest you put it on the inside of the wheel close to the wheel center section.

That's what I did and angled it so I could get a chuck on the stem from the outside through a slot in the wheel center section.

I use "Equal" tire balance powder in the tire for wheel balancing which works better than weights anyway. It was designed for use originally with heavy truck tires with inner tubes. It costs about $8 a wheel and you never have to balance them again. I run a fleet of trucks and it extends sometimes doubling the mileage of the tire because it balances the whole tire,wheel, suspension assembly.

Enough about that....the tire loks are great!!!

Hank
88 YJ (sort of)



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post #10 of (permalink) Old 08-21-2000, 01:41 PM
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Re: Swedish Tire Lock System

Hank;

Thanks for the great info. Couple more questions, which may seem obvious to you, but are relevant to the uninitated like me:

Do you put this 'Equal' in the tire-lock tube, rather than the tire? How much do you put in? What size/brand/model of tire are you using? This is really relevant because my 33 BFGs were no real problem to balance, but these swampers are another story!.........

Thanks again.

Chad

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