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post #1 of (permalink) Old 02-24-2012, 09:18 PM Thread Starter
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Alternator Based On Board Welders, Set me Straight

I've become a desert racing junkie and help chasing and pitting for lots of desert races. I've decided to fire our generator, it's loud, stinky, heavy, and takes up too much space. I've replaced everything else that used to run on 110 volts (grinder, work lights, cordless tool chargers) with things that will work on 12 volts or are cordless. I need to replace our 110 Volt Mig with something. I've thought about a hobart trek but if I could avoid spending $1300 on a battery powered welder I'd be happy.

How are the alternator based welders holding up? I've spent a couple hours searching and reading old posts, most of the posts were almost 10 years old. I'm a bit confused so please help me out.

From what I've gathered the GM alternators seem really simple to turn into welders using this write up Jon's Place/Jeep Page I think I have an 80 amp GM 2 wire sitting in my junk pile, is this a good alternator to use?

What is the reason for having the resistors in line in with the exciter wire? The guy mentions going with 100 watt resistors over 10 watt resistors. \ What type of heat sink do I want? There's about 20 different styles on radioshack.com

Do I need to worry about killing a factory wiring/ computers/ electronics? It will be going on my '97 4 runner and possibly an '04 Tundra I'm working on buying. I would like to keep the factory Toyota alternator and just have an alternator for welding.

I'm an electrial tard, when ever I start reading about Ford or Leece Nevel alternators my head start hurting. I did read 1 article about the Ford Alternator but it had some $100 12 volt to 110 volt box in it. Is it worth it to run the Ford Alternator (I could bust out the electronics/ automotive electrical text books and attempt to figure out what they are talking about).

Thanks for any help,
Andy
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 02-25-2012, 12:03 AM
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Electro-Tards are common, but it's a curable affliction.

APPLICATION!
If you are racing professionally, then there is no substitute for one of the 'Weld-A-Nators' on the market.

I'm assuming this is less that heavily sponsored 'Professional' series or you wouldn't be asking here...

For guys in the know, this is simple,
Do you want stick welding, MIG gun, TIG, what are you after?

-------------

Secondly, are you married to a generator welder, or would battery powered welder do just as well?
How much welding and heavy of welding do you do?

If it's just slapping on broken frame tabs, and general quick repair of carnage that doesn't have long duration,
Then batteries and spool gun is probably the way to go.

Batteries also give you the option of digging deep with a rod of you need to.

--------------

If you plain on long duration welding, then you will probably need a generator.

In that case, UNDER HOOD SPACE is a big deal,
And if you are out in the desert, I don't suggest you use the vehicle primary charging alternator.
A very good way to get to walk home or be hunting an alternator at 3:00 AM. in the middle of now where.

What I started out with was a plain old AC generator from a '70's ford T-bird.
They had two alternators, one rectified for DC, and one unregulated and un-rectified for AC output for the electric defrosters, heated windows, ect.

I moved to DC welding with a common Delco SI series alternator, which is neither powerful or long lived when you start digging with it.

This is one direction with the Delco SI alternator,



But I found that to be lacking. I used an 'Eye' terminal and grounded that wire through a resistor, allowed for NOT having to control the rotor so tightly.

-----------------------------

When I wanted to SERIOUSLY weld on the farm, I came up with this for a welder,
Leece-Neville alternator used on big trucks, ambulances, constructions trucks forever, and can be had in a Reman for around $100 if you watch the sale papers...

They come in 105, 130, 160 and 200 amp off the shelf, and that's not a 'Peak' rating, that's a continuous duty cycle if you can keep it cool.



High frequency AC taps out the back for TIG welding, even aluminum,
ISOLATED DC, that means it doesn't conduct the negative through your host vehicle, you can 'Straight Polarity' weld, Electrode negative, work piece positive without lighting up the host vehicle computer, stereo, ect.

And you can do 'Reverse' polarity also, (electrode positive, work negative)



The first thing you do, is take control of the rotor.
This is easy since the regulator bolts in from the top,
A couple of flat head brass screws, some plexi-glass, and you are off to the races...



I started out with a variable resistor from NAPA ($10) in a control box on the fender,
but I QUICKLY moved that variable resistor down to the welding stinger so I could control amperage at the weld.

Since you can add EXTRA rectifier bridges to the back of the case (if you have room in your mount) you can seriously extend the duty cycle.
Nothing to it, the mount on the back of the case, and you simply wire them to the stator connections inside.

This thing is BIG, about 1-1/2 times the diameter of a Delco SI,
And about twice as long with extra rectifier bridges,
So if you have a real confined space, this won't work,
But for farm work, and for trail use, it kicks butt!
MIG, TIG, Stick, even powers up my home made plasma cutter...

Powers 110 volt tools if they are regular brush type motors and not induction motors...
The AC frequency is too high for transformers and induction AC motors...

-------------------

You just tap the host vehicle battery for rotor voltage and the alternator does the rest, could not be more simple.
With a 'Rheostat' type variable resistor in the feed line for the rotor, you can fine tune the output at about any engine rpm above idle...

So Many Cats, So Few Recipes...

Last edited by TeamRush; 02-25-2012 at 12:29 AM.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 02-25-2012, 12:17 AM
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As to your question about the resistor,
A Delco SI doesn't need a resistor in the 'Exicte' (marked #1 or 'R') terminal to work.

The resistor is there for one of two reasons.
1. For the idiot light on the dash, which is in about all GM installs.
2. To keep the 'Excite' terminal from back feeding the ignition when you shut key switch down.

See, in a Jeep, when the primary igniton wire comes through the fire wall, it splits three ways,
One full voltage to the ignition module,
One with resistor wire to the igniton coil,
One to the 'Excite' terminal on the alternator.

When the alternator is NOT charging, that excite terminal is a 'Ground' through the rotor.
So it would run the battery down if the ignition switch didn't turn it 'Off' with the ignition.

When the alternator is generating, the 'Excite' terminal becomes a 'Positive', and without a resistor in place, it would back feed the ignition system it's connected to,
And you vehicle would continue running off the power from the alternator.

Both GM and Jeep need to be switched, but GM uses an 'Idiot' light, and the resistance from the bulb keeps the excite from backfeeding the ignition.

When you 'Hot Wire' the SI regulator shown above, you can control the feed to the rotor through the 'Excite' terminal, but that's a poor way to do things with the SI...
Usually, they don't live long when some knuckle head jacks the voltage up,
The alternator just cooks it's self since it's rectifier can only handle about 70 to 100 amps at best, and only for short periods at that.

The cooling heat sinks on the SI are just too small, and the factory made it difficult to add more to an SI.

--------------------------

Now, with a Delco CS series alternator, you need between 75 and 150 Ohms in that 'L' (Lamp) or 'Excite' circuit to keep the regulator alive.
The reason for the 'Adapter' with the resistor or putting in a larger resistor if you switch to a CS in a Jeep.

The CS charges at much lower speeds, and that 'Excite' circuit is tapped for an extra low voltage comparison for the regulator,
So it has to be resisted more, or it serves up the same signal as the 'Sense' wire and you don't get that low end charging anymore,
(and over time, you don't get ANY charging since the regulator can't live with a full voltage 'Excite' feed for long)

Extra heat sinks and diodes (Rectifier) will bolt on the back of a CS without too much trouble, but if you touch them in operation, you WILL get lit up!
So fabricated a shield that air will pass through if you go that way...

So Many Cats, So Few Recipes...
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 02-26-2012, 09:38 AM
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On the 3 phase A/C taps, would that be 12 volts nominal? Seems that it would be easy enough (at least in theory) to run through a transformer to get 120 volts A/C. Maybe by removing the regulator it isn't a predictable voltage?
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 02-26-2012, 03:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stump runner View Post
On the 3 phase A/C taps, would that be 12 volts nominal? Seems that it would be easy enough (at least in theory) to run through a transformer to get 120 volts A/C. Maybe by removing the regulator it isn't a predictable voltage?
No, Alternating Generators produce in AC. (Hence the term 'Alternator' instead of 'Generator' which 'Generates' in Direct Current or DC)

The AC production when you take control of the rotor is 'Un-Regulated', so voltage can be WAY up there, in excess of 250 volts if need be.
Since there is no 'Regulator' in the circuit, there is no 'Voltage' regulation unless you manually speed up the engine, slow down the engine, or use a 'Variable Resistor' to control DC (battery) voltage to the rotor.

If you don't understand how an alternator produces current, then this might be hard to grasp...

-----------

This lets you access that AC production from the three different sets of windings without modifying the case or trying to get room for wiring to get it out of the case since they come directly out the back already.

The voltage will be variable, depending on the amperage you pull off the taps,
But 120 volts AC isn't hard to do at all with about 1,000 crankshaft RPM.

Use one tap (usually far right) for your 'neutral' and the other two taps for single phase AC 'Hot' legs.
One leg 'Hot' leg per outlet usually.

Or you can combine for up to 3 phase AC at high frequency
(polarity reversal times in seconds is 'Frequency', or how frequently they reverse polarity in one second),

Since this is HIGH FREQUENCY AC, common AC transformers will NOT work with them, you will overheat the transformer and supply WAY too much current to what you have attached to the transformer.

Same deal with induction motors set up for AC.

But brush driven AC motors work OK with high frequency most times, like drills and saws.
Extended hard use will overheat even a brush motor, but they 'Will Work' even though not 'Ideal'.

-------------------------------------

Since I'm been accused of TOO MUCH 'TECH' on a tech forum... (Oxymoron?)

Would you care to know how an alternator produces AC current, then rectifies it into DC current for your vehicle?

So Many Cats, So Few Recipes...

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post #6 of (permalink) Old 02-26-2012, 07:43 PM
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I think I have at least a remedial understanding of what goes on. let's see if I am close and you can fill in the gaps and correct me where I'm wrong. The A/C generator will make two cycles, or one sin wave, of potential power per revolution of the alternator. I hadn't considered the frequency before though. It would reason that if (big if) you could generate the desired voltage at 30 revolutions per second, or 1800 rpm of the alternator, you would get 60 hertz A/C. Just seat of the pants, I would guess that at idle it already rotates faster than that because of the pulley sizes.

I don't know how the regulator functions.

As far as rectifying, a 4 diode rectifier is the only method that I'm aware of. I suppose they could be stacked in parallel to reduce individual component loading.

I remember from "window shopping", the Premier Power Welders use D/C for welding and the 110v output is also D/C. At that time the sales person was telling that incandescent bulbs, resistance heaters and brush style motors don't care about the direct current but, most other things do. Guessing that very high frequency A/C might be worse than the D/C for anything you could plug in. How does high frequency welding work out?

It would be cool to build, instead of buy, a welding and power system for "field work"
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 02-27-2012, 12:36 AM
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Risking another fight with 'Taz',
It's pretty simple magnetic induction at work...

The rotor is an electromagnet.
When you apply a DIRECT current to the slip rings at the rotor, you produce a POLAR magnetic field, that's a STABLE polar field, with a 'North' and a 'South' and it doesn't alternate like an AC field does.

Now, you have a 'North', and a 'South' but it's linear with the shaft in the alternator,
So alternators use end plates with Pedals on each end that alternate 'North' and 'South' poles thorough the stator windings...

This shows the slip rings, rotor winding to produce the electromagnetic field,
And one end of the pole leaves...




This is a diagram showing the same thing...



Now, the process of INDUCTION,
To INDUCE an electrical current in a piece of wire takes a MOVING magnetic field,
Or a moving piece of wire THROUGH a magnetic field.

This arrangement moves the magnetic field poles through the wire windings at a VERY high rate of speed, which produces (INDUCES) an electrical potential in the stator windings inside the case.

Since the magnetic field is switching poles, the output is in AC or Alternating Current from the stator windings.

THE FREQUENCY depends on how many times the magnetic field flips poles in the windings,
So the number of pedals on the rotor, and the shaft speed determine 'FREQUENCY' of that magnetic pole shift in the windings.

For any given number of windings and poles, the shaft speed determine the frequency.
You would have to figure that by knowing exactly how many coils there were in the stator, and how many pole pedals there are on the rotor,
The multiply that by shaft speed.
(or do it the way I do and use a frequency counter!)

---------------------------------------------

You need to MOVE those north and south poles through the windings to produce a ALTERNATING current,
The faster you switch from north to south through the windings, the more current you produce.

I'm sorry, this is the best picture I could scrounge up of the stator windings,



To increase output from the case size limitations,
The coils of wire are stacked slightly off set to each other,
And there are three 'Legs' of coils used,
If you look at the right side (where the mud dobber's nest isn't blocking the wiring)
You will see the stator windings are stacked in three band sets...

-----------------

SO,
If you have followed along this far,
Then you have a DC coil making an electromagnetic field,
The electromagnetic field is being shaped into poles leaves by the IRON end plates on the rotor,
The rotor spins the leaves to MOVE the magnetic field though the three coils of wire,
And the three coils of wire produce in 3 separate AC 'Phases' since the magnetic field can't pass evenly through all of them at exactly the same time....

-------------------------------

NOW, from here on out, everything is 'Solid State', nothing you can see moving, and that makes it more difficult for some, easier for others...

You have three coils being INDUCED into current production,
And you have to do something with that current.

This is a small Delco SI series rectifier overlaid with a diagram to make the diagrams easier to understand...



If you look close at the picture above of the stator windings, you can see the rectifier in the back of the case....

The rectifier is a POSITIVE and a NEGATIVE set of DIODES for each coil in the stator. (positive or negative depends on how they are installed in the circuit)

DIODES ARE ONE WAY GATE VALVES FOR ELECTRICITY.
Diodes are solid state (no moving parts)

By positioning the diodes as shown in the diagram/picture above, you RECTIFY AC current and have a DC production output.

Normal sien wave form looks like this on a Oscilloscope,



And when you look at the AC production, since there are three sets of stator windings, it looks like this,



---------------------------------------------

Now, if you run it through a DIODE RECTIFIER, it looks like this,



Not exactly steady DC, but if you look at the tops of the current being produce, it's getting MUCH closer to what we are looking for,



Throw in a LINE CAPACITOR, which you can see in the back of the case picture up close to the top of this post,
And you get this for an output. Capacitors smooth out the 'RIPPLE' between peaks...



--------------------------------------

So Many Cats, So Few Recipes...

Last edited by TeamRush; 02-27-2012 at 12:39 AM.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 02-27-2012, 12:51 AM
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NOW!
To answer some questions...

The reason the guys at the little alternator-welder places use a DC output is they run EVERYTHING though the RECTIFIER.
The alternator is built to do things that way, and it's too difficult to access the AC taps in those small case alternators.

You have to tap the AC feeds, you have to provide wiring outside the case, and things are tight in there already!

You don't have to mess with that on a Leece-Neville, the AC taps are supplied to you outside the case, so wiring for AC is easy.

I DO suggest you use a volt meter for the AC lines, you can get up to 250 volts without breaking a sweat and that will just cook most 110 volt stuff in a hurry!

Here is a diagram that shows the three windings in the STATOR,
The RECTIFIER with it's AC taps,
And how to wire up those AC taps for plug in tools...



Now, I also use a DC AMP gauge on the DC side of things, you can get some serious amperage with a Leece-Neville, so knowing what you are running for amperage is a good idea!

----------------------------------------

Just for the record, your '4 diode' rectifier (in a 'Diamond' shape) is for rectification of AC to Pulsing DC out put.
If you have large enough diodes and a capacitor in that same configuration, you can produce DC welding current from an AC welder.
I do that (with some pretty large diodes) myself when I need to do some DC specific welding with the old 'Buzz Box' AC welders.
Easier to take the rectifier to the job than to lug around a DC welder when you know where you are going has an AC welder...

The low hydrogen/high nickel rods I use to weld cast iron to steel come to mind, like welding the tubes to a AMC 20 center section or welding a truss on an AMC 20 diff housing.
The rods that work the best for me are DC only, and when I travel to help someone, they don't always have a DC welder available...

--------------------------------

One thing the little DC welders CAN NOT do is TIG weld aluminum.

It takes HIGH FREQUENCY AC to tig weld aluminum, and you will pay through the nose for that capability in a welder of any kind,
And you sure won't build one out of a little case alternator!

My Leese-Neville has TIG welded up to 3/8" aluminum, and trust me, that comes in handy now and again...

You WILL need the TIG rig, shielding gas, regulator, and a gas flow solenoid to do that or you will waste a lot of gas.

I've had welders stand an call me a liar to my face when I say that, but it's ENTIRELY possible, and we've done it several times.
You will have to spin that alternator!
You need high amperage to build heat, and you need high frequency AC or you can't produce a weld puddle correctly.

This thing also produces the power for my home made EDM (Electronic Metal Denigration/Electric Discharge Machining) that I use to make holes in really hard metal, remove broken bolts and taps, and the home made plasma cutter.
Being able to burn out a broken tap without damaging the work piece is a huge help at times,
And the plasma cutter eats 'Consumables' like crazy, but it sure beats trying to cut carnage out with a hack saw!
Makes fabrication of parts much faster also...

One of these days I'm going to sit down and figure out why I eat consumables up so quickly, but since I only use this thing in the 'Field', I just haven't taken the time to figure it out...
Probably not enough air pressure, I always push the air pressure limit, and that lets the torch heat way up, but I don't know for sure.

So Many Cats, So Few Recipes...

Last edited by TeamRush; 02-27-2012 at 01:22 AM.
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 02-27-2012, 12:25 PM
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The next thing you have to consider about the small case welders is,
They are all NEGATIVE ground.

If you attach a welding lead to their cases, and welding OFF the vehicle, you are fine.
If you try to weld on your OWN vehicle,
The entire vehicle is 'Ground', So you have to use a POSITIVE electrode to do any welding on your own vehicle.

When you crank up that DC output case to ground welder,
You are risking every electrical device in the vehicle.

Batteries HATE pulsing DC and won't tolerate AC at all,
And fuel injection computers/digital ignition boxes/digital radios don't stand a chance unless you unhook them before you weld on your own vehicle.

You can minimize the damage by having a dedicated ground clamp very close to your welding spot,
But stuff like a CDI ignition module is going to let the Magic Smoke out somewhere between 16 and 18 volts,
And you CAN NOT disconnect the ignition on a vehicle with an engine driven welder, no ignition, no engine, no welder.

This little tid bit came to me when I watched a guy burn up an ignition module, replace it with his trail spare, and do it again in the space of about 30 minutes.

----------------------

Amperage is dependent on the heat you are trying to generate at the welding electrode, the small the electrode (Large stick vs, small wire) uses less amperage,
But you still need between 18 & 24 volts DC to sustain that arc.

You can use a large line diode to keep polarity reversals in the 'Ground' that services everything on the vehicle from happening (AC WELDING, DC IS ALREADY RECTIFIED)
But the voltage pulsing as the arc strikes and breaks,
And the large amperage is still a problem.
One bad 'Ground' between where you are welding and the alternator case, and you get a crappy weld, if it welds at all, and/or you get metal overheating at the bad ground point,

Throw in some rust, some undercoating or a hand full of leaves around the 'Bad Ground' site, and you have a fire when that bad "Ground" point heats up from 50 to 150 Amps DC, and you have a fire instead of just blistering paint or burning the body out around a bolt that wasn't tight.

So a dedicated 'Ground' wire from the case to the weld site is ALWAYS mandatory in my book.

-------------------------------

I don't do 'Sheet Metal' work on the trail.
Body damage can wait until I get home.
I can 'Spot Weld' tin by putting the ground clamp behind what I'm working on and applying the other polarity to the metal on the other side,
Crude, but effective. And if I'm doing that in the field, it's good enough until I get home to a MIG welder and I don't have to pack the spool gun and all that goes with it around all the time.

I still build these things for the farm service trucks for the family farm,
Which is were the pictures of the one above came from.
We've tried the small case, several makers, several different conversions,
But nothing lives like the Leece-Neville and is as useful as the Leece-Neville.

The truck has seen some pretty damaged farm equipment in the field before,
But it has the under hood room for the big case Leece-Neville,
And it's got storage for the MIG and all it's crap, TIG and all the crap that goes with it,
And of course, stick welding stuff.
Tractors, plows, cultivators, planters, wind mills, water pumps, you name it, if it's on a farm, we've had to fix it at one time or another...
And the Leece-Neville has held up to all that welding without complaints.

The reason this one showed back up here is the brushes on the slip rings FINALLY wore out after about 8 or 10 years.

I didn't bother to rebuild it, at $100 for a reman and about $5 for the conversion, I just started with a fresh Reman with a warranty.

The best part about these Leece-Neville alternators is, with a little wiring and a couple of switches, the go from charging the vehicle to welder with the flip of a switch,
You will have that regulator laying there doing nothing,
So it's pretty easy to install it in the control box for the welder,
Hook the welding leads to the battery if the primary alternator goes out, and use the Leece-Neville for it's primary task, charging the batteries...

Once you hot wire the rotor in those small case alternators, good luck with getting them back without buying a manufactured unit that someone has figured out how to hot wire the regulator so it can be switched back and forth,
Then you still have to deal with the welding leads switching back and forth...

Like I posted in the beginning of this thread, you can take the 'Insulator Sleeve' off the Delco Screw, but from that point on, it's a WELDER,
If you do what I did, use an 'Eye' ring terminal on both sides,
Control that ground, you can switch back and forth until the regulator gives up from abuse...

IF YOU BUILD THIS WELDING GENERATOR FOR ANYONE ELSE...
You will have to watch out,
They WILL put an electric motor or gas engine on it and use it as a shop welder!

I kept catching my cousin using a big old 220 volt compressor motor to power up the Leece-Neville!
And that's just not it's intended purpose,

First, he was driving it WAY TOO FAST, kept having bearing failures and rectifier failures...

Second, the large AC 220 volt motor was consuming more energy than an actual shop welder would,

Third, they would leave it cranking and cranked up when they weren't welding... WAY TOO MUCH HIGH OUTPUT RUN TIME!
Hard on everything... This isn't an Industrial unit with 'Standby' capabilities...

--------------------------

When I'm out in the Jeep,
In day to day operations, I find two batteries have more uses than two alternators, so I go with dual batteries and weld off them.

I've gone back to welding off the batteries because they are there, I weld so infrequently on the trail, and I don't run into anything out there a 'Rod' won't handle...

Two batteries will give you about 10 minutes of burn time with smaller diameter rods before they need a rest and recharge,
Larger batteries would do more.

I don't carry dedicated welding leads anymore, I've gone to using 4 Ga. welding cable as my 'Jumper' cables, and those double as my welding leads.

Since the engine IS NOT running, and the batteries are NOT plugged into the Jeep when I'm welding,
No issues with toasting anything important (Usually just the hair on my knuckles! ),

With high amperage 'Quick Connects' I can have the batteries unhooked and plugged back in for welding in about 30 seconds,
And I can be geared up for welding in under 2 minutes without rushing.
Raise hood, unplug the batteries, plug in the welding yoke/jumper cables,
Throw a welding rod in the stinger, gloves, eye protection, and I'm off to the races.

If you need more than 10 minutes of actual burn time on the rods,
Then recharge the batteries for about 20 minutes and go after it again...

So Many Cats, So Few Recipes...
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 02-27-2012, 05:05 PM
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Quote:
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Risking another fight with 'Taz',
Not bad but not A material either. You don’t fully understand so you’ve glossed over some things. C+

Quote:
Originally Posted by TeamRush View Post
The rotor is an electromagnet.
When you apply a DIRECT current to the slip rings at the rotor, you produce a POLAR magnetic field, that's a STABLE polar field, with a 'North' and a 'South' and it doesn't alternate like an AC field does.



Now, the process of INDUCTION,
To INDUCE an electrical current in a piece of wire takes a MOVING magnetic field,
Or a moving piece of wire THROUGH a magnetic field.

This arrangement moves the magnetic field poles through the wire windings at a VERY high rate of speed, which produces (INDUCES) an electrical potential in the stator windings inside the case.
.
So, where did you get the magnetic field? What is connected to those slip rings?

It uses an INDUCTOR, a coil of wire. Current in the inductor produces a magnetic field.

To increase the INDUCTANCE, an iron (or iron alloy) core was added in the center of the INDUCTOR. This also allowed creating the vanes on the side.

Current in an INDUCTOR created a magnetic field. The magnetic field was pushed across a coil producing a current in the coil by INDUCTION.

Current in the coil produces a magnetic field. The magnetic field passed across a coil produces current.

_______________________


This is a bit misleading. It looks as thought one end of each winding connects to one diode pair.



In reality, both ends of each winding connect to a diode pair as shown here.



Quote:
Originally Posted by TeamRush View Post
Just for the record, your '4 diode' rectifier (in a 'Diamond' shape) is for rectification of AC to Pulsing DC out put.
That is called a bridge rectifier. As you say, it takes 4 diodes to get full wave rectification. It would take 12 diodes to rectify 3-phase AC but each winding end shares a pair of diodes with another winding end so 6 can be deleted.

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So, why the AC, do you want a big screen TV at the campsite?

If it’s for hand tools, generally they will run on DC. If they have brushes, they are combination motors and will run on AC or DC.

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This shows 6 phases 60 degrees apart. Note each phase has another one 180 out of phase with it.



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Rectifying does not triple the “peaks”, it doesn't even double the “peaks”. The negative HALF CYCLE is inverted to become positive.



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At least we cleared up what AC is and what DC is. Maybe you can explain to Jim.

Any other waveform is a combination of the two.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TeamRush View Post
Since I'm been accused of TOO MUCH 'TECH' on a tech forum... (Oxymoron?)
I can relate to that. Seems some people just seem to want to know THAT it works, like the valley girl’s understanding of her car.
If you know the HOW and the WHY, you’ll have it forever.

There are 10 kinds of people in the world.
Those who understand binary and those who don't.

Last edited by CJ7Taz; 02-28-2012 at 07:14 PM.
CJ7Taz is offline  
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