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Jeep-Short Wheelbase All discussion of short wheelbase Jeeps: CJ, TJ, YJ and JK

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post #1 of (permalink) Old 09-09-2003, 10:28 PM Thread Starter
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to lock the front or the rear?

I was just about to buy a locker for my rear when I read this off of one of the locker mfg's FAQ's.

"A front installation will usually yield the greatest improvement in off-road capability. This is due to the general requirement of increased in traction under hill climbing or rock crawling. Under full climbing conditions, due to the angle of the vehicle, the rear wheels carry a much greater weight (weight transfer) and therefore, the front carries less weight and tends to break traction very easily. Once one front wheel starts to spin the other wheel stops turning and the whole front diff ceases to provide traction. At this point the load is transferred to the rear diff as if the vehicle was a 2WD and due to the increased load the rear wheels tend to spin and the vehicle stops. If you can stop the front wheel from spinning you have solved the traction problem. In addition to the traction performance a front installation does not introduce any changes in handling characteristics."

This seems interesting. Since my CJ is a DD, it would be nice to keep the diff open in the rear and have the benefits of a locker offroad. I just always assumed I'd lock the rear first. Anyone agree or disagree with this? Any input would be appreciated.
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 09-09-2003, 10:51 PM
 
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Re: to lock the front or the rear?

I vote for a locker in the front and a tight limited slip in the rear. Which kinda kills the trac-loc for your AMC20. Wife has a Powr-Lok in the Scout D44 rear. It is very tight and it really does make a difference when on the trail but doesnt do anything goofy on the road. Which is what I wanted for her! Just put a lockright in both! You will just have to be a little more careful on ice and snow.
ust my $.02
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 09-09-2003, 11:20 PM
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Re: to lock the front or the rear?

Disagree for 2 reasons.

1- The front axle is the weaker axle, usually. Locking it adds more stress to the axle shafts, breakage is more likely.

2- The wheel carryin the majority of the load is doing the majority of the work. If 75% of the weight is on the rear axle in a climb, it is doing 75% of the pushing, that is where the traction aid needs to be.

Whose FAQ was that on, because that doesn't match up with what I have seen on the trail?

The locker in front and a Powr-Lok in back would work pretty well. I had a Powr-Lok in an old Jeep and it was pretty darn good.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 09-09-2003, 11:35 PM
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Re: to lock the front or the rear?

I may do what wade said. I really don't want a locker in the rear because my Jeep sees alot of street miles. I know, they aren't that bad to live with, but my theory on something poping and locking on asphalt just puts too much stress on stuff. I'd vote for a limited slip (Eaton Posi's have different springs you can put in to 'adjust' the agressiveness) in the rear and a locker in front. Remember though, You are dealing with a 20 something year old Dana 30, not known for it's immense strength when new. I'd vote for tougher axle shafts (Warn or Superior) with the big U-joints and a locker for the D-30.
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 09-09-2003, 11:45 PM
 
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Re: to lock the front or the rear?

Lock the rear first - a friend of mine put in a lock rite in his front D30 when I put in a spool in my rear D44. Same trails we travelled and I could make it up sections he couldn't. Why? Going up hill the fronts have very little weight to pull you up, but the rear carries the burden. His fronts would spin along with his peg leg rear and go nowhere, while I idled up the same obstacle. If you are worried about on road/street driving, go ARB or Ox - selectable when you need it.

Also, a front locker messes with steering off road, especially if you don't have PS, but even then can be a prob.

Good luck with what ever you decide to do.
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 09-10-2003, 12:06 AM
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Re: to lock the front or the rear?

I'll chime in. A rear locker improves your traction so much, that there are many times you won't even need 4WD to negotiate obstacles. A locker in the front really increase your turning effort and radius. A twin stick setup is a must on a fully locked front. I would bet that in most climbing situations more than 75% of the vehicle weight is transferred to the rear axle. So that is where you need your traction. I have seen many short wheelbase jeeps get up on a ledge and spin their front tires. A guy can sit on the front bumper or use a strap and they come right up. You need a rear locker to push you up in those situations.

Later,
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 09-10-2003, 12:47 AM
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Re: to lock the front or the rear?

All of this being said, what are the advantages of a front locker?
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 09-10-2003, 09:47 AM
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Re: to lock the front or the rear?

I just took care of both ends and put in two lockrights. With the lockable diff in the transfer case, turning off road isn't any worse than stock. [img]images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img]
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 09-10-2003, 10:36 AM Thread Starter
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Re: to lock the front or the rear?

Hey Kent,
I got the info off of the Aussie locker site.
Aussie
I was about to get a Detroit in the rear. But the introductory price of this Aussie locker is pretty tempting and the initial feedback on the Pirate board has been good. Anyone use this locker yet?
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 09-10-2003, 10:45 AM
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Re: to lock the front or the rear?

The literature that came w/ my Lockrite says "The Lock-Right in the rear axle produces about 70% of the total differenve in traction between two Lock-Rites and no Lock-Rites."
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