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post #1 of (permalink) Old 12-13-2002, 10:34 PM Thread Starter
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OT - Its official, I start Grad school in January

Well, I have succeeded in enrolling in Grad School. I have not been admitted to the Public History Masters program yet as I was too late for the Spring semester, but I have sent in almost all of my required materials. I just have to track down a writing sample from undergrad, which is hard given the nearly three years since I had to care!

Its amazing how much I'm looking forward to going back. My first class is in Cultural Resource Managment and Historic Preservation. In other words, if the state wants a highway, we would look into what historic or other cultural resource would be placed at risk and how it can be saved. The class is also involved in historical significance assessment. In other words, I would go out to a site, learn everything I can about it including doing a structure report, surveying, digging (in dirt and books) and using the information to report on how "important" the site is.

I'm excited as this class will help me decide which track to follow for my MA. I like historic education, which I do now, but I don't want to do it for much longer and besides, there isn't much further I can go in this field, whereas the other fields open up government jobs, contract work, or NPS work!


Just thought I'd share. For those guys (and gals [img]images/graemlins/wink.gif[/img]) thinking of going back...do so!!!

Fritz
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 12-14-2002, 06:39 AM
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Re: OT - Its official, I start Grad school in January

That's terrific! Congratulations! Keep us updated as you progress. Are you going to turn into one of "them" now? You know, "You can't drive there - three Native Americans pitched camp overnight only a hundred fifty yards east of there in the the winter of 1712."

That sounds like a very interesting field. A bunch of years ago I came across a book, written about 1900, that described the physical nature of the St. Louis area. It described the Cahokia Mounds, railroad rights of way, geographic features, even the layers of soil, rocks, sand coal and limestone underneath the area. It was so interesting that I loaned it so someone who never brought it back [img]images/graemlins/mad.gif[/img]

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post #3 of (permalink) Old 12-14-2002, 08:08 PM
 
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Re: OT - Its official, I start Grad school in January

Congratulations. So your studying archaeology or is it something else. I took an archaeology class this fall in undergrad, was a pretty cool class to my suprise. I got another year and half or 2 years until its time for my graduate studies to start. Anybody know of a graduate school with ancient Roman study in the history department? I haven't had luck searching as of yet. Congratulations to ya.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 12-16-2002, 01:05 PM
 
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Re: OT - Its official, I start Grad school in January

congatulations!
History has always been one of my favorite subjects..
I'm just starting out and have 4 1/2 more years [img]images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img] probably at the rate I'm going.
Good luck!
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 12-16-2002, 04:54 PM Thread Starter
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Re: OT - Its official, I start Grad school in Janu

</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
Are you going to turn into one of "them" now?

[/ QUOTE ]

Yup! [img]images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] Actually, I haven't decided in which area I am interested. I doubt that three Native Americans or anybody for that matter would be enough by itself to stop development.

I don't want to do that sort of thing anyway. I want to be involved in the hands-on discovery and analysis of the history. I love rediscovering what some genious of the past figured out. I particularly like studying old farm implements because of the creativity of the farmers.

That book sounds like a real gem. One area I am looking into is computer compiled maps that give more information than a standard map can. This requires survey ability, computer knowledge and historical ability. I am great with maps and spacial understanding, I already build computers and webpages, etc..., and well, I'm an historian.

We'll see. My first clas will give me a good taste for what is to come.

Imagine! Excited about going back to school!

Fritz
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 12-17-2002, 04:46 AM
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Re: OT - Its official, I start Grad school in Janu

[img]images/graemlins/crazy.gif[/img] I love the smell of diesel smoke as the dozer tears through an ancient Indian burial ground; and there's very few things that can better enhance a historic village site than an overpass and a darn good 7-11 convenience store. I've always had a fondness for Hydraulic Mining, and I wish we had never given up the practice of dumping old tires in the river. [img]images/graemlins/laugh.gif[/img] The biggest laff I've had lately was from the local tribe in the Sonora CA area. As the state hiway dept built a big by-pass, the indians were checking every spoonful of dirt to see how much delay and expense they could cause. Just a few miles away their own contractor was building an Indian Casino, and when a dozer uncoverd some artifacts, well, THAT didn't matter because well, those artifacts could be MOVED no problem! [img]images/graemlins/laugh.gif[/img] [img]images/graemlins/laugh.gif[/img] I LOVE the smell of diesel smoke in the morning.......it smells like....."progress"?????? [img]images/graemlins/laugh.gif[/img] [img]images/graemlins/laugh.gif[/img] Hey.....how about registering my 1952 John Deere tractor as a "historic farm implement" and getting me a fat grant to work with. I could buy two new tires for the front end. [img]images/graemlins/crazy.gif[/img] The front tires that are on the tractor are kind of "iffy". [img]images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img]
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post #7 of (permalink) Old 12-17-2002, 05:31 PM Thread Starter
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Re: OT - Its official, I start Grad school in Janu

CJDave,

Cynical as always!

Actually, you can register your tractor as historical. If you do, and somebody destroys it, you could collect a larger return, assuming that your state allows that and you are willing to drive it seldom! [img]images/graemlins/smirk.gif[/img]

Double standards are annoying, but I believe that history has an important place. Sure progress should continue, but how would we feel if the governement suddenly paved over all of our favorite trails and put shopping malls in our parks?

One of the reasons I got into Jeeps was the ability to enjoy the history (which is what all parks really are about - the way America was, natural or otherwise) of our land. Heck, even Jeeps have history, look how often we quiz ourselves here about this or that dealing with older Jeeps.

If the Indians have valid reason, then yes, I support suspending development in favor of history. If its irrelevant or common enough (ie, camp site) then a shovel survey should at least be conducted just in case something is hiding.

Me, I want to go back east and focus on industrial history. I want to work on saving historically significant buildings, machines, and processes for future engineers.

An example: Did you know that there isn't a man alive that is trained to cast the frame for a steam engine? Nor are there machines around still for that. We could make new ones provided the plans can be found, but wouldn't that be reinventing the machine? Lost knowledge is always a pity.

No offense to the Western folkd here, but I'd rather be back east were I was born and were industry got its start in America.

Later
Fritz
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 12-18-2002, 03:09 AM
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Re: OT - Its official, I start Grad school in Janu

[img]images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img] Since I'm a multi-multi-multi-generation native Californian, I have no firsthand acquaintanship with the traditional industrial areas of "Smokestack America". Now that we are in the Midwest, I just love to drive around and see the remnants of what was once a great industrial heartland, now-mostly-gone-to-the-Chinese-who-hate-us-and-who-have-always-had-"the bomb",-but-now-have-a-nice-new-compooter-to guide-it-thanks-to-Scumbag Klintun.....but that's yet another story. We recently went to East Moline Illinois and saw some of the gritty industrial areas from bygone days. [img]images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img] I've heard that the New England textile factories had floors which were made from posts set ON END, and that lanolin from all the wool had soaked down several inches into the timbers. [img]images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img] U.S. foundries have been driven out by OSHA, and by foreign foundries that have no inspections, low overhead, and no pollution standards. [img]images/graemlins/mad.gif[/img] Today's foundry techniques are SO DIFFERENT, that if you WERE to set up and cast the base of a steam engine it would be an entirely different setup. [img]images/graemlins/crazy.gif[/img] Caterpillar used to make some terrific castings for the tractors, now they are using mostly robot flame-cut pieces which are robot welded to make the majority of the bigger housings. [img]images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img] The "scrap rate".....how many parts you toss because of "core shift" or other casting defects... is often what determines if a casting design will survive in industry. Some of the best stuff is no longer made because of the high scrap rate; case in point....the early Chrysler Hemi Heads..... [img]images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img] The more complex a casting is, and the more machining operations that it requires, the more opportunity there is for something to go wrong and scrap the part. In the old days, machinists could take their time and pay more attention to what they were doing without the distractions of high production, football game banter, drug useage, and generally thinking about the weekend instead of about work. [img]images/graemlins/crazy.gif[/img] Interestingly enough, Henry Ford's foundries were some of the best around, and the airplane engines made there during WWII were so precise that they WEIGHED LESS than engines cast by other foundaries. [img]images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img] If you look at early machinery, you'll notice that a lot was invested in the base casting. ONE PIECE did it all, so to speak. There were fewer large pieces, rather than many small pieces. The tractors I grew up on were largely made on that principle. Even my '52 John Deere has several more pieces than the '41 of the same model I drove as a kid. Your work is SOOOOOOOO interesting! [img]images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 12-18-2002, 08:25 AM Thread Starter
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Re: OT - Its official, I start Grad school in Janu

Yeah, I'm excited about this career.

Setting the timbers on end was also done very commonly in Railroad engine houses to soak up the spilled oils and grease.

I enjoy studying old machines. My uncle-in-law, the blacksmith, just got a massive metal shear that can cut through 8 inch solid in one hit. It is over 12 feet high and makes the concrete pad it is mounted to shake. To power it, he has had to purchase an old railroad generator set that can supply 3 phase power. Amazing stuff.

Later,
Fritz
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post #10 of (permalink) Old 12-18-2002, 11:11 AM
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Re: OT - Its official, I start Grad school in Janu

I've seen timbers on end in old machine shops. I had always assumed that it was done that way because wood is much stronger in compression parallel with the grain. Also, wood changes size with humidity changes, but very little in the direction of the grain.
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