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post #1 of (permalink) Old 11-18-2002, 01:50 AM Thread Starter
 
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Dummy Countershaft tool?? - Tranny rebuild

I'm getting ready to rebuild my T-176 in the CJ. All the manuals say to use a "dummy countershaft" to remove the countershaft/cluster gear. I assume it keeps the 9000 needle bearings from flying everywhere.
Problem is I can seem to find one. Does anyone know where to get one or what size stock I need to make one?
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 11-18-2002, 06:31 AM
 
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Re: Dummy Countershaft tool?? - Tranny rebuild

I seem to remember this question coming up before, and the solution was a wooden dowel of the proper diameter. Don't hold me to it though.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 11-18-2002, 07:32 AM
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Re: Dummy Countershaft tool?? - Tranny rebuild

Having a tool is more important for assembly. If nobody has a better answer, just be careful to not lose any needles when you take the shaft out. Then measure it and look for an assembly tool.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 11-18-2002, 09:33 AM
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Re: Dummy Countershaft tool?? - Tranny rebuild

If it is anything like my T-150, they said to use a wooden dowel or broom stick handle, I ditched all those ideas for a good smear of Whit grease. Who cares when you're tearing it down, not only are you replacing those bearings ina proper rebuild, but all they do is fall to the bottom of the case when tearing it down. when you put it together just smear white grease or Vasaline all over them as you assymble it and that will hold them in place. the grease will break down when it gets going and it won't harm a thing.I using it through out the rebuild to hold needle bearings and shims in place. worked like a charm.

brent
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 11-18-2002, 09:54 AM
 
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Re: Dummy Countershaft tool?? - Tranny rebuild

I used a section of stainless tube, it was slightly smaller than the specs for my T18, but worked, although I did mushroom the end of the pipe while beating the counter shaft out, so if yours is in there like mine was you wont be able to get it out with a wooden dowel!

Ive since made another from some solid stailess for a T18, ive heard of folks using black pipe, copper pipe, bascally whatever is the closest size you can find to the actual shaft.

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