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-   -   Flat towing a CJ7 (https://forums.off-road.com/jeep-short-wheelbase/140847-flat-towing-cj7.html)

NHCJ7 10-23-2002 05:53 PM

Flat towing a CJ7
 
Okay, first off I know this has been discussed before, but I did a search and couldn't find what I'm looking for.

I've got an 86 CJ-7 with a Dana 300 TC and Dana 44 rear axle that I plan to flat tow with a tow bar. I've heard of problems with the drive train unless you disconnect the drive shafts. Is this necissary, and why? If I have the transfer case in neutral, wouldn't that do it?

Tippy 10-23-2002 06:18 PM

Re: Flat towing a CJ7
 
The problem with flat towing the D-300 is that, when in neutral, it doesn't sling oil up to properly lube the bearings. My owners manual ('80 CJ-7) says that you can flat tow for up to 200 miles, then run the motor with the t-case in gear, relube the bearings, and then continue on with the tow. Or you could just disconect the rear drive saft, wire it up out of the way, which isn't all that hard.

JEEPN 10-23-2002 09:30 PM

Re: Flat towing a CJ7
 
Yeah, but the manual also says not to tow over 30 mph and 15 miles without the front end locked in. I can tell you from personal experience it takes less than 10 miles to bake the seals and bearings at 30 mph.

If you flat tow you will either have to remove the rear driveshaft or lock in the front axle, as the front driveshaft will sling oil around the transfer case, the rear output shaft does not touch the oil.

WILL 10-23-2002 11:46 PM

Re: Flat towing a CJ7
 
And even then, the front ouput doesn't sling much oil.

ryankopecki 10-24-2002 02:00 AM

Re: Flat towing a CJ7
 
My origional (81 year model) factory manual says to tow it with the d300 in 2 hi and the manual transmission in neutral. And it says to run the motor every 200 miles. I think it's supposed to be run with the t-case in neutral and the tranny in gear. Running the motor with the tranny in neutral won't do you any good. I don't see why you even need to run the motor at all if you keep the t-case in 2-high. That's exactly the same thing as driving it. I've towed mine over 2000 miles and have had no problems. If you have an auto, you get to disconnect the drive shaft.

tippy, how do you run the motor with the t-case in gear? Do you unhook from the tow vehicle?

WILL 10-24-2002 08:06 AM

Re: Flat towing a CJ7
 
ryankopecki, that makes sense to me but I don't know if I would risk damaging the tranny.

The logic there is with the transfer case in 2hi, the gears are turning and throwing oil around just like driving down the road. But now the tranny output bearing is spinning without being lubed or cooled. By running the engine with the tranny in neutral, the input gears and countershaft are spinning to get oil up to the tranny output bearing.

I still think with a dana 300 it would be easier to just remove the rear shaft.

NHCJ7 10-24-2002 09:37 AM

Re: Flat towing a CJ7
 
Thanks for the info, sounds like the general consensus is to just disconnect the rear shaft.

ryankopecki 10-24-2002 12:09 PM

Re: Flat towing a CJ7
 
That makes sense. The t-case is oiling itself just like regular driving and you start the engine up every 200 miles to oil the tranny. Good, I like my dana 300 but I wouldn't mind if the T-4 died.


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