Seized stainless bolts - Off-Road Forums & Discussion Groups
Jeep-Short Wheelbase All discussion of short wheelbase Jeeps: CJ, TJ, YJ and JK

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of (permalink) Old 08-28-2002, 07:10 PM Thread Starter
Official Curmudgeon
 
CJ7Taz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Kansas
Posts: 4,705
Thanks: 2
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
 
Seized stainless bolts

I just put the rollbar back in after modifying it to work with the halftop. I used stainless steel 3/8" bolts and nuts. I went out a couple of hours later to put some rubber pads I had cut under the feet. Two out of the twelve seized when I tried to remove them. They loosened about two turns and wouldn't move, not with a 1/2" drive ratchet, not with a 1/2" drive impact wrench.

I didn't really tighten them down hard, just used a standard 3/8" drive ratchet and box end socket. I noticed that one that almost seized, but eventually came loose with some persuasion, had sharp thread edges in two spots. At first, I thought poor grade stainless, but I can't break them off. What gives? I've used stainless for all fasteners I can and have never run into this problem before.
CJ7Taz is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of (permalink) Old 08-28-2002, 07:25 PM
Keyboard Implanted
 
pontiac58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: southern new jersey
Posts: 2,818
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
 
Re: Seized stainless bolts

Stainless bolts like to do that from time to time. I always antisieze stainless stuff before i install them.
pontiac58 is offline  
post #3 of (permalink) Old 08-28-2002, 07:26 PM
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Posts: 2,137
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
 
Re: Seized stainless bolts

According to the catalog from Totally Stainless, ALL stainless bolt threads should be coated with anti-seize.
I like the silvery Permatex Anit-Seize in the grey jar.
Jaffer is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of (permalink) Old 08-28-2002, 08:03 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 232
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
 
Re: Seized stainless bolts

Stainless steel is not a good choice for structural stuff. Most of that stainless is grade 1 at best -- unless you buy the super-zoot expensive stainless super-fasteners. The standard 304 SS fasteners are usually too soft to make good structural or load-bearing fasteners. They also gall like crazy, and won't ever want to come apart.

If you want good corrosion resistance, get some chrome or gold cad plated gr.5 or gr.8 nuts and bolts. Save the stainless for bolt-on diamond plate corners and shiny stuff that is not structural or load bearing -- especially for things that your life depends on like roll bars and suspension.

Best regards

John
truckjohn is offline  
post #5 of (permalink) Old 08-29-2002, 12:06 AM
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 1,628
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
 
Re: Seized stainless bolts

Stainless is bad about that. Make sure you use lots of anti-seize [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img] It also helps to tap the holes to get the rust out of the threads.
I just had that problem a few days ago when I took my hood off. I heated the bolts until they were glowing, then let them cool, and they all came right out. Now my shiny bolts are all blue, so I'm just gonna leave the hood off like Jaffer [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img][img]images/icons/crazy.gif[/img][img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img]

BTW, you really shouldn't use stainless for the roll-bar, use grade 8 instead. Stainless isn't nearly as strong and really shouldn't be used for structural applications.
dschwab9 is offline  
post #6 of (permalink) Old 08-29-2002, 01:42 AM Thread Starter
Official Curmudgeon
 
CJ7Taz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Kansas
Posts: 4,705
Thanks: 2
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
 
Re: Seized stainless bolts

I had heard about the anti-sieze on stainless but it was with reference to engine bolts into cast. I didn't know it was a problem using a stainless bolt with a stainless nut. I'll use some.

On the strength, I guess I need to see some documentation. Grade 1 is balderdash. The documentation I have seen indicated that even the cheap stainless was nearly equal to grade 8. Since I couldn't break the bolt even with a 24" breaker bar, or the impact gun, I tend to believe they're pretty strong. I couldn't even round off the corners.

I usually use stainless anyway, but in this case I am bolting through fiberglass and when I took the old bolts out, they were eaten away by rust to less than half of their original cross sectional area in the middle. How many times does a guy pull the roll bar bolts to check for rust through?

Chrome is no good for corrosion prevention. A little scratch through the chrome will let the bolt rust away leaving only the chrome shell. Chrome is defiantly no good for fasteners. The process makes the outer shell brittle, that's why front end parts should never be chromed except on show only cars.
CJ7Taz is offline  
post #7 of (permalink) Old 08-29-2002, 07:22 AM
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Posts: 5,140
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
 
Re: Seized stainless bolts

depending on what you paid for those stainless bolts they will be really weak or incredibly strong.

if they are common off the shelf "stainless hardware" from Lowes or somewhere like that, they arent rated, meaning grade 2 or less.

304SS is really soft, But it makes a fair bolt in large diameters like 3/4 16, where I used to work we used 8 of them to attatch a 100 HP electric motor to a floating platform with a 4 foot long x 2 foot dia impellor on it, and they held fine, I as suprised they didnt use grade 8, but the engineers had never seen a failure based only on bolt fatige.

and I learned the hard way on those, you HAVE to have a liberal coating of antisize on stainless to stainless or you wont be able to remove it, even a 1/4 stainless bolt will sieze when you try and back it out if its dry.

ozarkjeep is offline  
post #8 of (permalink) Old 08-29-2002, 07:29 AM
Mud in my Veins
 
Caver Dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Winston-Salem, NC
Posts: 5,512
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
 
Re: Seized stainless bolts

I'm with everyone else on this. Slobber the anti-sieze liberally and wipe of the excess. (always figuring I'll need to remove it in the woods with a Kmart socketset at 3AM in a downpour @ 33*F, I coat EVERYTHING with it! [img]images/icons/blush.gif[/img])
There's also a issue with mixing stainless fastners in carbon steel inserts (nut-serts) called "dis-similar electrolysis"(?). It happens when to different metals contact each other, causing corrosion to form (try this an AL bolt and a brass nut [img]images/icons/shocked.gif[/img]). While it can happen quickly, I doubt that was the case with yours.
Caver Dave is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Off-Road Forums & Discussion Groups forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome