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post #1 of (permalink) Old 03-02-2002, 07:32 PM Thread Starter
 
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OT - Which 115V welder?

I am looking at the Lincoln WeldPak 100, and the Campbell/Hausfield 105 model and the Craftsman.

The Campbell and Craftsman both have the regulator kit. Campbell has 5 year warranty, Craftsman has 1yr, and Lincoln has 3 yr.

Prices I have seen: Lincoln - $339, Campbell - $297, and Craftsman - $297.

Does anyone have any suggestions to help my search?
Thanks, OS

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post #2 of (permalink) Old 03-02-2002, 08:13 PM
 
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Re: OT - Which 115V welder?

There's lots of thoughts on it. Glad you are getting one. First you need to determine if the power of them are going to be enough and then search on "welder" or '115v' or '110v' or '220v' and I am sure you will find the exact answer you are looking for.
btw I have a hobart handler 135 with a regulator and I love it.

it's only good to burn bridges if you're being chased.[img]/wwwthreads_images/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

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post #3 of (permalink) Old 03-02-2002, 08:22 PM
sas87yj
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Re: OT - Which 115V welder?

get 220 wired in your garage for around $100-$150 and get the lincoln 225 stick welder. i did and am real happy with it. got it used for $140. new around $250 at home depot. with the 220V welder, you don't have to worry about the steel being too thick or having to run more passes. hey- you don't want to use wimpy steel on your jeep mods right?

i know you said 115V but you should reconsider in my opinion

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post #4 of (permalink) Old 03-02-2002, 09:32 PM
 
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Re: OT - Which 115V welder?

I am also looking for a welder, and have a few questions.

I am only looking to do light welding ( bumpers, trail rack, shock mounts..) no exteme fabricating, probably only use the welder a 10 times a year, if that.
Do I need Mig or will flux core wire work for me.

I have no welding expierience, and dont want to take a class, I am taking plenty as it is, I am the type to jump in a try it, sink or swim.

I have heard wire feed is eaiser to learn then stick, is this true, what are the advatages of stick or wire feed, what would you recomend for me?

any thing else is appreciated
thanks,
tony

79 CJ 5, 258, dana 30, model 20, T18, dana 20, 2.5" rancho lift, 1" shackles
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post #5 of (permalink) Old 03-02-2002, 09:55 PM Thread Starter
 
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Re: OT - Which 115V welder?

I've already got access to a 220V stick welder, but I was looking for a portable 115V wirefeed for smaller jobs such as body and exhaust work (among other things). You are right, the stick welder is good when you really have some heavy welding, and need deep penetration.

-OS

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post #6 of (permalink) Old 03-02-2002, 10:07 PM
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Re: OT - Which 115V welder?

I wouldn't consider bumpers and shock mounts to be "light welding", but it is doable with a 115V wirefeed machine - you just have to make more passes. A wirefeeder with the CAPABILITY for MIG is what you want, as you may decide that you really like welding and want to do some autobody repair or the like. Fluxcored is fine for the heavier stuff, as it will penetrate a bit more then solid wire using 115V input. You'll kick yourself though if your machine can't handle MIG welding.

MIG/FCAW welding is generally easier for novices then stick welding, but to be a good MIG/FCAW welder requires a fair amount of skill. Most people can pick up a wirefeed gun, start welding on some scrap, and produce "acceptable" beads within an hour or so. However, before welding on some relatively structural stuff like bumpers, shock towers, cages, trailers, etc., it is best to have a few smaller welding projects under your belt. As well, check the strength of your welds by placing a butt joint (two pieces of metal joined together edge-to-edge (in ASCII art, ][ )) in a vice and hammering the crap out of the plate until it is bent at a 90* angle. If the weld didn't break or tear, you should be strong enough.

Stick is a little more challenging for some beginners, but once you have mastered the art of stick welding, most other welding process are simple to learn. The real advantage to stick is its ability to easily use the correct electrode for the job - just place the rod in the holder and off you go! With a wirefeed system, you'd have to swap the entire spool of wire, possibly change tips and/or liner, adjust wire tension, etc. Stick welding is also fairly easy on the wallet, as you can pick up a used basic buzzbox for under $100. All you need is to supply the electrodes and helmet and you're set. [img]/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

My advice is to see if any friends have a welder and play on their machine for a while to get the feel of the process.

Time, heat and pressure.
The same things that make a diamond also make a waffle.

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post #7 of (permalink) Old 03-02-2002, 10:14 PM
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Re: OT - Which 115V welder?

I'd go with one of the small Lincolns, Millers, or Hobarts. They're all great little machines. I've got a Lincoln WeldPak 100 with MIG conversion kit (paid ~$500 CAN), and it's a pretty good, portable welder. It's perfect for autobody or light gauge jobs.

For those who want something different [img]/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif[/img] , you can try one of the small inverters by Lincoln and Miller (such as the Miller Maxstar 140, Miller STR 200). These are a bit more pricey (~$900 for the Maxstar 140, higher for the STR 200), but they can use 115V AND 220V input power. The Maxstar STR 200 can also use single phase or three phase input power, 115V to 460V. Pretty neat stuff. The Maxstar 140 weighs in at a paltry 10 lbs while the STR 200 is 32 lbs. Both machines are HIGHLY portable.

Time, heat and pressure.
The same things that make a diamond also make a waffle.

~Scott Meyer
post #8 of (permalink) Old 03-02-2002, 10:25 PM
 
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Re: OT - Which 115V welder?

Will a mig weld be stronger then a flux core weld?
Or is just easier to produce better/stronger/nice looking welds?
tony

79 CJ 5, 258, dana 30, model 20, T18, dana 20, 2.5" rancho lift, 1" shackles
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post #9 of (permalink) Old 03-02-2002, 10:30 PM
RPerry
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Re: OT - Which 115V welder?

A MIG weld is not any stronger then a FCAW weld. The only problem may be that the welder didn't remove the slag from the FCAW weld bead and welded over top of it, leaving slag inclusions behind which will weaken the weld. On the other hand, if a gust of wind blows your shielding gas away while MIG welding, you're left with a "sponge" of metal as a weld. Both situations are not good for weld strength.

MIG does have a nicer bead appearance though.

Time, heat and pressure.
The same things that make a diamond also make a waffle.

~Scott Meyer
post #10 of (permalink) Old 03-04-2002, 09:10 AM Thread Starter
 
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Re: OT - Which 115V welder?

It sounds like you are suggesting I spend $340 for a regulatable Lincoln WeldPak100 vs. a $297 already regulated Campbell/Hausfeld.

But... Does anyone have any experience with the Campbell/Hausfeld 105 wire feed (with a 5 yr warranty...)

Thanks, OS

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