Stall Converter - Off-Road Forums & Discussion Groups
GM Standard IFS Trucks & SUV's All discussion of full sized IFS Trucks, SUV's to include Suburban

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of (permalink) Old 07-28-2000, 12:30 AM
**DONOTDELETE**
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Stall Converter

Just what exactly is a stall converter? [img]/wwwthreads_images/icons/blush.gif[/img] I know its a stupid question, just never really thought about it before, I know I have alot of questions, but Im new to the scene (about a year), not just off-roading, but everything dealing with cars, please bear with me! Thanks.

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of (permalink) Old 07-28-2000, 12:57 AM
**DONOTDELETE**
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Stall Converter

I will try to explain tis simplely. Stall speed is the RPM tha your engine flashes to when you stomp the throttle from a standing start, if you don't spin your tires. It will vary with the amount of power an engine puts out. Stall speed is not the RPM you can bring your engine upto aganst your brakes, but if you have a tranny brake , you can find out what your stall speed ids easally. Just engage the trans brake, stomp the throttle and read the highest RPM your engine goes to. I hope that was simple.

Thanks, Ray

post #3 of (permalink) Old 07-28-2000, 01:24 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Posts: 1,623
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
 
Re: Stall Converter

WHAT???[img]/wwwthreads_images/icons/shocked.gif[/img] Damn, now I bet he is really confused! Fyrball Is correct, but this may help you out a little more.
In the simplest terms, the "Torque Converter" is also sometimes referred to as a "Stall Converter" The two terms are interchangeable.
Now what it does is basically delivers the torque, or power, from the engine to the transmission (Automatic trannys ONLY) "Stall" refers to, at what RPMS the engine will reach before the tranny is fully engaged (remember I am trying to keep this as simple as possible)
I could explain this in great detail and it would go on FOREVER [img]/wwwthreads_images/icons/frown.gif[/img] but instead just go to http://www.hughesperformance.com They make EXCELLENT stuff and they have very good descriptions of all the tranny terms and applications[img]/wwwthreads_images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

Scoobydoo is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of (permalink) Old 07-28-2000, 03:27 PM
**DONOTDELETE**
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Stall Converter

I think I understand sort of...the only question I have is what do you mean the when the tranny is fully engaged? So if I were to get a new engine, and its peak torque was at say...2500 RPM to maximize the performance I would get a 2500 RPM stall converter? Thanks!

post #5 of (permalink) Old 07-28-2000, 04:10 PM
TEX
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Stall Converter

<font color=purple>That sounds logical, but it's not the case. Actually, a truck that has peak torque around 2,500 would be best with a stock converter that might stall just above 1,000. "High-stall" converters (meaning converters that stall at higher RPM's) can cause numerous problems in daily drivers or trail trucks. First off, they're typically smaller, meaning they carry less fluid. And if you drive around at low RPM, the tranny won't ever be fully engaged. Both of these things cause heat - your tranny's worst enemy. Even competition mud boggers don't use nearly as much stall as mud draggers & drag racers 'cause they get too much slippage & heat in deep mud.</font color=purple>

TEX

http://sites.netscape.net/gumboracing


post #6 of (permalink) Old 07-28-2000, 04:26 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Posts: 1,623
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
 
Re: Stall Converter

This is in response to 89, not to TEX (we must have been typing at the same time)
No, that's not really it. Really, for a truck your stock stall which is probably around 1200-1400? is right.
A high stall torque converter only comes into play, when you drag race! you know how you hold your foot on the brake and run your RPMs up before you launch? have you ever done that and had your RPMs up high and when you let your foot off you launch but then your rpms drop and you have to build them back up? This is what a high stall torque converter prevents! it will help you keep your rpms up! and it will allow you to rev up higher before your brake system can no longer hold you still. This is also where trans brakes come in, for even higher rpms then a high stall can handle by itself, a transbrake basically holds a tranny in first and reverse at the same time, so NO drive power is going to the rear end until it is released, then "BANG" launch!
For you and your truck a good heavy duty torque converter is best, look at the TowMaster from Hughes it is what I have myself but I am not sure if it is for small blocks? Anyway a Heavy duty torque converter has welded fins and uses 6 bolts to the flywheel, and I think it may hold a little more fluid?. Your stock they just bend over the end of the fins(they will eventually pull out) and has 3 bolts to the flywheel. Does that clear it up more?

Scoobydoo is offline  
post #7 of (permalink) Old 07-28-2000, 04:55 PM
RolngThun
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Stall Converter

OK, here is my shot at it.
A converter works like two fans facing each other, one has power(engine side) the other one is driven from the first one(trans side) through fluid power, in this case air.
When both fans are turning at the same speed, this is what the other guys referred to as fully engaged.
You can change the stall speed by changing the number, the pitch,and the size of the fan blades.
A torque converter also has a stator, this redirects the fluid back through the driven side when the converter is stalling to double the torque output.
Stall speed is determined by two things, torque applied, and load against it.
A converter behind a 4 cylinder engine may stall 2000 rpm, put that same converter behind a 454 and it now stalls like 5 or 6 thousand. And that is how high stall converters are made. My 5000 stall converter for my big block is a modified quad-4 (I think that is what they call them little 4 banger engines) converter. They reinforce the fins, change the hub to fit a turbo trans,weld in balloon plates,and weld on reinforced drive lugs to fit V-8 flex plate.
The idea is not to get a high or low stall converter, but to get one that matches your combination. And alot of stuff comes into play, cam profile, tire size, gear ratio, truck weight,carb size,and more. My suggestion to anyone wishing to buy a converter, is to talk to a good company for there recommendation. They have computer programs and lots of experience to get you the correct one.Be prepared to answer a bunch of questions like above. If they don't ask them, then call someone else.
Did anyone really read all that? And I don't even type.

post #8 of (permalink) Old 07-28-2000, 05:41 PM
RolngThun
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Stall Converter

And something else. When buying a converter, get all the correct info,and don't lie to the guy.
Pay the 5 bucks to get your truck weighed at the local truck scale, scrap yard, or gravel pit. If you tell him your truck weighs 5000 pounds and it really weighs 6500 you just bought the wrong converter.
If you tell him you have one bad ass 350 making 400 horse and it only makes 250, you just wasted your money on the wrong converter.

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Off-Road Forums & Discussion Groups forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome