Front wheel bearings torque spec - Off-Road Forums & Discussion Groups
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post #1 of (permalink) Old 08-31-2003, 12:13 PM
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Front wheel bearings torque spec

Tackled the front wheel bearings replacement job yesterday and ended up putting everything back together since the 96 Bronco needed a special hub socket that I didn't have (bought the regular 3 prong hub socket.) Anyway, everything is done now and it drives like a champ.

One thing that I should have done was replace the half-rounded lock washer. It doesn't look too good. Probably will wait until after the holiday to buy and replace.

One question: I torque the bearing nut tight to seat the bearings and backed out until it's 20ft-lb. The wheel is still hard to turn. I had to loosen it A LOT in order to rotate the disk brake by hand. Is this normal? I don't want to burn the hub by torquing it down to spec. But then I don't want the wheel to fall off on my on the road. Suggestions? Thanks.

Have a good weekend. Heading out to Long Boat Key for a day...

John
96 XLT Bronco - 4" lift & 35s
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post #2 of (permalink) Old 08-31-2003, 09:26 PM
 
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Re: Front wheel bearings torque spec

torque inner to 90lbs while spinning the rotor, make shure the bearing fully seats, then back off the inner nut 1/4 turn.
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post #3 of (permalink) Old 09-01-2003, 03:02 PM
 
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Re: Front wheel bearings torque spec

There seems to be a number of different torque specs floatin around for these hubs. What I have always used is:
inner bearing adjusting nut, torque to 70lbs/ft while rotating the hub back and forth to seat the bearings. Back the nut off 90 degrees (1/4 turn), retighten the nut to 15-20 lb ft, subject to one of the lockring (which goes on next) holes aligning with the dowel pin on the inner bearing adjusting nut. Outer locknut goes on next, and is cranked down to 150-180lb/ft. My torque wrench only goes to 150, so that's where I torque it to. The wheel should turn with only little hand effort and there should really be no noticeable end to end play.
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post #4 of (permalink) Old 09-01-2003, 10:29 PM
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Re: Front wheel bearings torque spec

Thanks, guys. I did just that today and it's running like a champ. I also replaced the half-rounded lock rings mentioned above and filled the hub up with synthetic grease. I don't think there's any place in there left for water even if it were to seep in!

Another note, eventhough I replaced the inner and outer bearings/race & seals, I did not replace the little 3rd bearing & it's seal because of more work involved. How important is that little bearing?

Regards,

John
96 XLT Bronco - 4" lift & 35s
post #5 of (permalink) Old 09-02-2003, 01:04 PM
 
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Re: Front wheel bearings torque spec

I assume you are talking about the small spindle bearing? It is not "as important" as the hub bearings as those are spinning everytime you drive. the spindle bearing gets its workout once you are in 4WD and the front axleshafts are turning. Did you get a chance to at least eyeball it to make sure it's in decent shape? It's ok to just clean these and regrease if they are in good shape.

We have a lot of prior posts talking about whether or not the hubs should be packed full of grease. I guess you will be our test bed....Timken does not recommend doing this, but some here have also expressed what you mentioned concerning water having nowhere to go inside if they are packed full. I use synthetic grease as well, but only use enough grease to pack the bearings, and leave a little grease around the bearings and coating the inside of the hub to prevent rust.
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post #6 of (permalink) Old 09-02-2003, 03:18 PM
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Re: Front wheel bearings torque spec

I am in agreement with packing the hub full of grease. For years, this was what I did with the Toyota FJ40's closed knuckles (Toyota actuallt recommended packing their closed knuckes 3/4 full of grease.) I constantly subjected the FJ40 to mud & water and that kept the liquid stuff out good. The truck also ran fine. I also believe in full synthetic grease. Even if water got in there, the mixture would never destroy the grease keeping the bearings happy.



By the way, I am reading Ford's service instructions for the 96 BRONCO "Wheel Bearing Retainer Service: F6TZ-3N105-AA". It goes like this for the torque spec: "Torque the wheel bearing retainer nut to 50 ft/lb while rotating the wheel assembly. Back the nut off 1/4 turn and re-tighten and torque to 20 in/lb" (note the in/lb and not ft/lb.)

John
post #7 of (permalink) Old 09-02-2003, 10:30 PM
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Re: Front wheel bearings torque spec

Who makes a good synthetic wheel bearing grease? It's probably worth the extra $ given how long a tube will last.
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post #8 of (permalink) Old 09-03-2003, 09:03 AM
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Re: Front wheel bearings torque spec

Mobil-1 full synthetic (the red grease) is expensive but worth it. Protection from -35F to +450F and excellent protection to water and rust.

Mobil1 Synthetic Grease info

John
96XLT
post #9 of (permalink) Old 09-03-2003, 06:08 PM
 
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Re: Front wheel bearings torque spec

Valvoline does as well. Probably about the same temp rating, not red, just boring gray. About $4-5, which is why I like it so much. Screw all the synthetic stuff everywhere else, just too much $$ to be sinking into engine/trans/tcase/axles when I replace those fluids so regularly. But the grease, as you say Muddy, goes a long way for front steering and hubs, definitely worth it.

John, I also just noticed this comment:

"One thing that I should have done was replace the half-rounded lock washer. It doesn't look too good"

My lock "washer" which goes between the two lock "nuts", has holes in it, of course, that align with the inner lock nut dowel pin. now, my washer also has a little ear to align with the slot in the spindle, and appears to be made "rounded" on the edge on one side only all the way around the washer. Is that what you are referring to? Or maybe the owner before you did not have these pieces adjusted right?
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