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Old 10-06-2006, 08:44 PM
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Default Streight six vs V-6

Just a general question.

Is there a mechanical advantage to a streight six configuration over a "V" 6? Is it just a manufacturing advantage (cheaper) that Jeep made so many streight six's?

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  #2  
Old 10-06-2006, 08:50 PM
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Default Re: Streight six vs V-6

IIRC, the inline design lends itself to torque while the V config is faster revving and a broader powerband...
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Old 10-06-2006, 10:18 PM
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Default Re: Streight six vs V-6

the inline 6 is a naturally balancing design......so they typically run real smooth-like without need for some of the fancier balancing stuff you find on other engines.

i have a strong hunch that this is the reason that Cat (whom i do work for) and other large displacement diesel mfgrs makes most of thier machinery and on-highway engines as inline 6 diesels. they dont run very high revs compared to a gasoline engine, so they keep the vibrations lower in the low(er) RPM range.



i read online that inlines are actually more expensive to manufacture than a V-6.....not sure why....maybe something with casting the block... [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img]
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Old 10-06-2006, 10:40 PM
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Default Re: Streight six vs V-6

I for one am very disappointed that the I6 has been terminated by DC. It really was/is the best CJ/Wrangler motor ever offered for the average wheeler. (Torque!!!)

Kriss
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Old 10-06-2006, 11:08 PM
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Default Re: Streight six vs V-6

I-6 is a much better off-road motor for crawling and trails. Great torque, and very tractable. v-6 is generally better for mud and sand, where hp and rpm's help. Personally, I like the good old 258. I've outwheeled both 4.0's and v-6/8's a lot of times, just because of the traction factor. They spin too much, and I just tractor to the top. On any places that aren't tight and slow, they leave me in the dust, but I seem to catch up eventually.
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Old 10-06-2006, 11:37 PM
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Default Re: Streight six vs V-6

231 buick baby,,, best 6 clynder ever made if you can get it to run without eating the botom end.....

Go ahead flame on.... I like them cause I can rework them in my sleep and have on a few occasions.

I agree with greg on the ve 6 being naturaly ballanced, but the 258's are a fine motor as well.
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Old 10-07-2006, 01:13 AM
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Default Re: Streight six vs V-6

The I6 also has 7 main bearings to carry crankshaft stress, as opposed to 4 bearings in the v-6.
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Old 10-07-2006, 12:47 PM
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Default Re: Streight six vs V-6

[ QUOTE ]
I agree with greg on the ve 6 being naturaly ballanced, but the 258's are a fine motor as well.

[/ QUOTE ]

[ QUOTE ]
the inline 6 is a naturally balancing design......so they typically run real smooth-like without need for some of the fancier balancing stuff you find on other engines.
:

[/ QUOTE ]

???
Is that what he said?

In my opinon the Chevy 4.3 Vortec is the best v6 ever made and the Ford 300 is the best 6 cyliner ever made.
the jeep six is prett good also. I've had al three engines and put well over 200K on all of them.

The worst 6 cylinder I ever had was the OHC Pontiac but it wasn't realy the engine bu the intake manifold warping that caused me grief.
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Old 10-07-2006, 03:35 PM
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Default Re: Streight six vs V-6

When you cram 6 cylinders onto a short crankshaft you have design problems with spacing the crank throws to create even firing. You weaken the V6 crank too much by having the throws separated really far. You can do it more easily with an inline 6. Thats why V6's typically have bad balance but some use an internal balancer that is spun inside the engine to make it smoother.

V6 advantages are compact, ideal for small front wheel drives and short hoods, also more equal length of intake runners. A bigger concern when carburetors were used.

I6 advantage is longer crank allows for individual crank throws. Allows total freedom of design in firing angles and as mentioned, side benefit of having more main bearings.

Both have similar horsepower potential, although I6 are seldom designed with that goal in mind.
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Old 10-07-2006, 07:41 PM
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Default Re: Streight six vs V-6

A V6 based on a V8 is a balance nightmare because, besides the reciprocating masses being oriented in a strange way, the igintion events aren't evenly spaced. That's why they will often have an auxiliary balance shaft to make up for some of that.

A V6 built to be a V6 will usually have 60 degrees between banks, although some (Ferrari, for one) have had 120 degrees between banks. They will produce equally spaced ignition events and aren't too bad to balance mechanically.

An in-line six is naturally balanced, and so is quite smooth, even with huge pistons thrashing back and forth like in a Caterpillar engine.

There is nothing inherent in any engine design that lends itself to higher torque, higher horse power or higher operating ranges, except:

Long intake and exhaust runners tend to 'tune' at lower frequency, hence in a lower RPM range. But that can be designed around by putting bends into the manifolds.

The longer the crankshaft is, the more trouble there will be controlling harmonic vibrations.

Because of those factors engine designers usually want to work with a shorter, more compact engine when they want high RPM and high horsepower. So all of the factors that truly affect the power output and RPM range where it occurs are customarily found in V engines for high power and in-line engines for high torque and lower operating range.

Those factors are bore and stroke ratio, primarily for average piston speed reasons, intake and exhaust manifold design, valve size, combustion chamber design and cam and ignition timing.

There's no reason that a V engine couldn't be designed to produce as much grunt as an in-line, and no reason that an in-line couldn't produce high RPM horsepower close to a V engine. The Jaguar in-line six was a great sports car engine, and the old GMC V6 and it's cousin, the V12, were torque monsters.

It's all in what the engine designer wants and what parameters he has to work with.
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